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Full text of "Men of mark in Connecticut; ideals of American life told in biographies and autobiographies of eminent living Americans"

CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 




FROM 



The original of this book is in 
the Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://archive.org/details/cu31924092206618 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



924 092 206 618 



MEN OF MARK IN CONNECTICUT 



Men of Mark in Connecticut 



IDEALS OF AMERICAN LIFE TOLD IN BIOG- 
RAPHIES AND AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF 
EMINENT LIVING AMERICANS 



EDITED BY 

COLONEL N. G. OSBORN 

EDITOK "NEW HAVEN JOURNAL AND COURIER ' 



VOLUME V 



WILLIAM R. GOODSPEED 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 
1910 



Copyright 1910 by W. R. Goodspeed 



A? 



The Case, Lockwood t Brainard Company, Printers, Hartford, Conn. 



MEN OF MARK IN CONNECTICUT 

Col. N. G. Osborn, Editor-in-Chief 



ADVISORY BOARD 



HON. WILLIAM S. CASE 



JUDGE SUPERIOR COURT 



Hartford 



HON. GEORGE S. GODARD . 

STATE LIBRARIAN 



Hartford 



HON. FREDERICK J. KINGSBURY, LL.D. . . Waterbubt 

MEMBER CORPORATION TALE UNIVERSITY 



CAPTAIN EDWARD W. MARSH . 

TREASURER PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BANK 



Bridgeport 



COL. N. G. OSBORN ...... New Haven 

EDITOR NEW HAVEN JOURNAL AND COURIER 



HON. HENRY ROBERTS 



Hartford 



ex-governor 



HON. JONATHAN TRUMBULL 

LIBRARIAN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Norwich 







\U« 




FRANK B. WEEKS. 

TRIED by a test that rarely comes to men — and never came to 
but one other man in Connecticut — Frank Bentley Weeks of 
Middletown has proved true to his lineage and his name. 
Called from business affairs to a high public station, that of lieutenant- 
governor, he was performing his duties quietly and was winning new 
meed of respect from his fellowmen when the stern decree of fate 
placed him in the chief office of the State — in the chair of the 
executive himself. The people turned to him in their grief over the 
death of Governor Lilley and, though the standard established was 
of the highest, they were not to be disappointed. 

We know that rarely does the life of such a man begin with his 
own. For its true inception we look back to his ancestry. And it 
is to the records we must turn, since Mr. Weeks is one of those 
unboastful men who wish to let their name rest on what they have 
done or not done themselves. Such men in their hearts may have an 
ancestry to be proud of but they never are known to rely upon it. 

We find, then, that a Thomas Weeks came from England in 
1637, and that a John Archer left the home country for the new 
world ten years later. From both of them, and from Jasper Griffing 
on the maternal side, who came from Wales in 1670, we trace the 
governor's descent. Archer was of that Warwickshire family which 
was founded in England by Fulbert Li Archer, who came into 
England with William the Conqueror. To John Archer was given 
a grant of 1250 acres of land in America, and he was made by 
Charles II "Lord of the Manor of Fordham" (New York). 

Of the best Anglo-Saxon and Welsh blood, Mr. Weeks was born 
in Brooklyn, New York, on January 20th, 1854. His father was 
Daniel L. Weeks, and his mother Frances M. Edwards. His father 
was a prosperous merchant. When the son was only thirteen years 
old the family removed to Middletown and the boy continued his 
studies in the high school there. In Brooklyn he had attended a 
military school and, youthful as he was when he left it, he had 

9 



10 FRANK B. WEEKS. 

acquired a precision, promptness and alert bearing that were to 
remain with him through life. 

The boy early having shown a predilection for the finer side 
of business affairs, his father decided to give him the benefit of a 
training at one of the foremost institutions in the country at that 
time — the Eastman Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. 
While availing himself fully of this opportunity to obtain the best 
scientific knowledge, the youth also was storing his mind with those 
readings and researches which go to make up broad culture, indulging 
his natural taste for the best in literature and the arts. Thus, when 
he was graduated in 1872, at the age of eighteen, he was equipped 
for meeting life's chances as well as for assisting in the conduct of 
the most exacting business affairs. 

Having taken another two years to round out the period of his 
adolescence and still further strengthen his mentality, he returned to 
his home in Middletown, there to become its most eminent citizen. 
Each step he has taken has been, however, only with the one desire 
to make that step satisfactory to his conscience and to his associates. 
Thus his first appointment and task was in connection with the 
Connecticut Hospital for the Insane to which the State had just 
begun to give special attention. He began in 1874, as an assistant 
to the superintendent in the business management of the institution 
— an institution in which his services as trustee through many 
subsequent years have proved invaluable to the State. 

But his duties directly in the office of the hospital covered 
only a period of sis years. In 1880, he associated himself with 
George A. Coles of Middletown, and they took over the large grain 
and milling business of the corporation known as Union Mills, which 
they conducted under the firm name of Coles and Weeks. Eor fifteen 
years, Mr. Weeks' ability, integrity and always courteous manner 
did much toward winning for the concern the high reputation it 
enjoyed far beyond its immediate confines. 

On November 4th, 1875, Mr. Weeks was married to Miss Helen 
Louise Hubbard, daughter of J. Warren Hubbard of Middletown. 
Their home was one of the most attractive and delightful in the 
city, and in it, then as now, Mr. Weeks found his chief enjoyment. 
In 1895, his personal affairs and other duties coming to claim so 



FRANK B. WEEKS. 11 

much of his attention, he decided to give all his time to them and 
to retire from the milling business. He is a director of the 
Middletown Savings Bank and in the Middletown Mutual Assurance 
Company in addition to being trustee in the Connecticut Hospital 
for the Insane. He has constantly taken a deep interest in the 
welfare of his community, and when the Middletown Board of Trade 
was established, he was its first president. Also he served two years 
in the Court of Common Council of the city. 

While he always is glad to work for the public good, his recrea- 
tion he prefers to find in the circle of his own home and immediate 
companions. He is a member of the University Club and of the 
Colonial Club of Middletown, also of the Hartford Club, and is a 
charter member of the Middlesex County Historical Society, where 
he indulges his love for the study of ancient times. For pastime 
he likes nothing better than driving a good horse, and one only has 
to see him with his horse or his dog to appreciate how deep is his 
feeling for all dumb animals. He is a member of the Congregational 
Church. 

It was in 1895 that he first came conspicuously into the public 
eye of the whole State. Governor Coffin had appointed him to 
represent Connecticut at the Cotton States and International 
Exposition at Atlanta, Georgia, and in the discharge of that function 
he brought great credit to the commonwealth. He was president 
of the commission. In 1904, his name was upon the Bepublican 
list of presidential electors for the State, and acting in that capacity 
he cast his vote in the electoral college for Roosevelt and Fairbanks. 

In the Eepublican state convention, September 8th, 1908, he was 
the unanimous choice for second place on the state ticket, and this 
though he never had held a state office other than as already indicated 
and had had no legislative experience. But he had established a 
name as a wise man and a good man, and such a man the party was 
seeking. He was elected by a plurality of 40,487. From the moment 
he delivered his address as presiding officer of the Senate, it was 
seen that no mistake had been made in selecting him. He was the 
friend of no clique, the backer of no scheme; he stood only for 
square dealing, in the interests of the people. In 1909, he received 
the degree of LL. D. from Wesleyan University of Middletown. 



12 FRANK B. WEEKS. 

Early in the session, Governor George L. Lilley was stricken 
with a severe malady. Special duties of the chief executive were 
thrust upon the junior even before it was considered necessary to 
formally transfer the routine work. They were days of embarass- 
ment as well as of anxiety — anxiety both for the State and for his 
greatly loved friend, the Governor. The transfer made by the 
Legislature preceded by but a few days the full and complete transfer, 
following the Governor's demise, April 21st, 1909. It was in the full 
tide of a brilliant and energetic administration, ordained by the 
people in a year of general arousing. There was no inclination on 
Governor Weeks' part, when he was sworn in, either to shirk the 
severe task or to be presumptuous. In every act since that day, 
and oTten despite heavy pressure, in his public utterances, his ap- 
pointments, his much applauded vetoes, his one purpose has been, as 
through all his previous life, to do well that which his hands find 
to do without fear or favor. Although the circumstances of his 
governorship are fortuitous — and by the same token his position 
more difficult — his administration already has received the com- 
mendation which is given only upon the most faithful discharge of 
such trust directly imposed by the people. 



HEMAN OTIS AVERILL. 

AVEEILL, HEMAN OTIS, State Commissioner on Domestic 
Animals, and one of Connecticut's most honored and active 
Eepublicans, has held many important state and local offices, 
has been a leader in industrial and agricultural affairs, and is now 
Judge of Probate for the District of Washington, Litchfield County, 
Connecticut, his birthplace and the home of his family for genera- 
tions. He was born on August 20th, 1856, and represents the sixth 
generation of Averills who have lived on and owned "The Averill 
Homestead," which is situated on land once a part of the great 
Wauramaug Reserve, owned and ruled by a former Indian chief of 
that name. The land was deeded to Samuel Averill in 1746 and the 
conveyance reads " County of Hartford," Litchfield County being 
unknown at that time. 

Mr. Averill is descended from William and Abigail Averill, who 
came from Broadway, Worcestershire, England, to Ipswich, Massa- 
chusetts, about 1630. The line of descent is through William (1), 
William (2), Isaac (3), Samuel (4), Perry (5), a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, Samuel (6), and Samuel Johnson (7). Samuel 
(4) was the first proprietor of "The Averill Homestead" and farm. 
Mr. Averill's parents were Samuel Johnson and Laura Phinette 
(Piatt) Averill. His father was a farmer who held several town 
offices and was state representative and a deacon in the Congrega- 
tional Church. He was characterized by integrity, honesty and firm- 
ness of purpose and was widely respected. By example and precept 
both these worthy parents taught their son lasting lessons of frugality, 
honesty and perseverance. It was their wish that their only son 
remain at home and keep the ancestral farm in the family and his 
great love for his parents, combining with his family pride to meet 
their wishes, determined his choice of a career. 

After suitable schooling in the public schools and at the Wara- 
maug Academy, Heman Averill entered Oberlin College, where he 
took a special course. His time outside of school was given to farm 

15 



16 HEMAN OTIS AVEKILL. 

work, which afforded few real holidays to a boy who loved play far 
better than work. Soon after he became of age he became proprietor 
of the family farm. He engaged actively in dairy farming from that 
time until 1903, when his son was ready to assume the management 
and thus allow his father to give his whole time to his official duties. 
The Averill farm is one of the most fertile and productive in Litch- 
field County and is also one of the most fully equipped and ably 
managed. Seventy-five head of finely bred cattle graze on the splendid 
pasturage of this historic and beautiful farm land. 

In 1893 Mr. Averill was one of the organizers of the Washington 
Feed and Supply Company, of which he became first secretary and 
afterwards president. In April, 1909, the company was reorganized 
as The Washington Supply Company, Incorporated, with Mr. Averill 
as president. 

It has been said of Heman 0. Averill that he has had all the 
public offices he would accept for as long a time as he would hold 
them. He represented Washington in the famous " deadlock " session 
of 1891, and in 1895 he was state senator from the twentieth district. 
He was paymaster-general on the staff of Governor George E. Louns- 
bury, resigning July 1st, 1899, to accept the appointment of Commis- 
sioner on Domestic Animals tendered by that governor. He has been 
reappointed by all the subsequent governors. 

Since 1898 he has been Judge of Probate for the District of 
Washington, each election since the first being unanimous. From 
1900 to 1908 he was County Director of the Connecticut Dairymen's 
Association, being succeeded by his son, Ralph J. Averill. 

General Averill is past master of Washington and Excelsior 
Pomona Granges, P. of H., and Rising Sun Lodge, No. 27, F. and 
A. M. He is fond of social life and of all sports and games. His 
generous, outspoken but charitable nature has won him a wide circle 
of friends throughout the state, and he is well known and prominent 
at all public gatherings and conventions. He is loyal to his party, 
his friends and his principles, and in return commands a general 
loyalty from admirers and supporters. 

On October 20th, 1881, Mr. Averill married Bertha Wheaton 
Buckingham, daughter of Ralph and Elvira Buckingham, at St 
Andrew's Church, Marbledale, Connecticut. Seven children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Averill ; six are living : Laura Buckingham, 



HEMAN OTIS AVERILL. 17 

Ralph Johnson, Clara Wheaton, Dorothy, Heman Perry, and Grace 
Julia. The older son, Ralph Johnson, is now at the head of the family 
dairy-farm, having assumed that position after his graduation from 
the Connecticut Agricultural College in 1903. Commissioner Averill 
makes his home the year around at " The Averill Homestead," situ- 
ated a thousand feet ahove sea level and one of the sitely estates of 
the county, famed for its antique mahogany, pewter and china, for its 
historic interest and beautiful environment, but still more for its 
six generations of stalwart, progressive farmers who have tilled its 
soil and served state and country with honor. 



ANDREW NELSON SHEPARD. 

SHEPARD, ANDREW NELSON, state senator, business man, 
and leading citizen of Portland, Connecticut, was born there 
May 5th, 1862, upon the extensive farm which forms the family 
homestead. His father was Nelson Shepard, one of the ablest farmers 
in all that country, and his mother was Elizabeth Tryon Shepard, 
daughter of Noah Tryon of Glastonbury, and related to the Welles 
and Hollisters of Glastonbury. Colonel Shepard's family have been 
well known in the Connecticut River valley for more than two hun- 
dred years, his earliest American ancestor having been Edward 
Shepard, who came from England and settled at Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and was made a freeman there in 1643. Andrew Nelson 
Shepard is the tenth generation of descent from Edward Shepard. 

Andrew N. Shepard attended the district school and later the 
academy at South Glastonbury, following this with a two years' course 
at Cheshire Military Academy. His vacations were spent with his 
father on the farm, and as his father had made great success of raising 
tobacco he naturally devoted himself to that staple. He began buying 
tobacco in 1887 and this business has steadily grown until he has 
large dealings with important tobacco growers in all parts of the state. 
In 1888 he entered into partnership with Mr. J. P. Convey, at Gilder- 
sleeve, Connecticut, for the manufacture of cigars, and in this enter- 
prise he continued until 1901 when he sold his interest in the cigar 
manufactory to his partner. This enterprise was entirely independent 
of his principal business, the buying and packing of tobacco, which 
he still continues. 

Colonel Shepard's sound judgment and business ability led to his 
election as director of the Freestone Savings Bank, and the First 
National Bank of Portland. Naturally political honors followed busi- 
ness success and he served his town as auditor for the long term of 
ten years. For a decade he was a member of the board of relief. 
Then he was sent for several terms to represent his community in 
the General Assembly. In the Legislature Colonel Shepard made and 

18 



ANDREW NELSON SHEPARD. 21 

carried a great fight for the railroad indebted towns, securing a bill 
by which the 6tate assumed a part of the indebtedness and thus eased 
the burden on many of the country towns. In 1906 Colonel Shepard 
was elected to the State Senate, where he proved a very capable and 
efficient member, aiding especially in the passage of the free bridge 
bill to free the bridges across the Connecticut Eiver. In 1909 he was 
appointed by Governor Prank B. Weeks one of the commission to 
construct a bridge over the Connecticut Eiver between the towns of 
Old Lyme and Saybrook. 

Colonel Shepard is a vestryman in Trinity Church of Portland. 
He is a member of Warren Lodge, No. 53, A. F. and A. M. ; of Wash- 
ington Commandery, No. 50, of Middletown; of Sphinx Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, Hartford; of Middlesex Lodge, No. 33, of the A. 0. 
U. W.; of Middletown Lodge, No. 771, B. P. 0. E.; and a charter 
member of the Portland Lodge of Odd Fellows; a member of the 
Social Club of Portland, of the Hartford Club of Hartford, and of 
the Union League Club of New Haven. 

On May 1st, 1889, Colonel Shepard was married in Windsor 
Locks, Connecticut, to Miss Harriet Stockwell, daughter of Mr. A. 
B. Stockwell, a leading business man of that place. They have two 
children, Dorothea and Nelson A. Shepard. 

Colonel Shepard was a delegate to the Eepublican National Con- 
vention, June 19th, 1908, at Chicago, and was an aide on General 
Bell's staff when President Taft was inaugurated, being the only 
military man from Connecticut. Colonel Shepard was appointed 
commissary-general by Governor Lilley and reappointed by Governor 
Weeks. 



ANDREW NELSON SHEPABD. 21 

carried a great fight for the railroad indebted towns, securing a bill 
by which the 6tate assumed a part of the indebtedness and thus eased 
the burden on many of the country towns. In 1906 Colonel Shepard 
was elected to the State Senate, where he proved a very capable and 
efficient member, aiding especially in the passage of the free bridge 
bill to free the bridges across the Connecticut Kiver. In 1909 he was 
appointed by Governor Frank B. Weeks one of the commission to 
construct a bridge over the Connecticut River between the towns of 
Old Lyme and Saybrook. 

Colonel Shepard is a vestryman in Trinity Church of Portland. 
He is a member of Warren Lodge, No. 53, A. F. and A. M. ; of Wash* 
ington Commandery, No. 50, of Middletown; of Sphinx Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, Hartford; of Middlesex Lodge, No. 33, of the A. 0. 
U. W.; of Middletown Lodge, No. 771, B. P. 0. E.; and a charter 
member of the Portland Lodge of Odd Fellows; a member of the 
Social Club of Portland, of the Hartford Club of Hartford, and of 
the Union League Club of New Haven. 

On May 1st, 1889, Colonel Shepard was married in Windsor 
Locks, Connecticut, to Miss Harriet Stockwell, daughter of Mr. A. 
B. Stockwell, a leading business man of that place. They have two 
children, Dorothea and Nelson A. Shepard. 

Colonel Shepard was a delegate to the Republican National Con- 
vention, June 19th, 1908, at Chicago, and was an aide on General 
Bell's staff when President Taft was inaugurated, being the only 
military man from Connecticut. Colonel Shepard was appointed 
commissary-general by Governor Lilley and reappointed by Governor 
Weeks. 



DENNIS ALBERT BLAKESLEE. 

BLAKESLEE, DENNIS ALBEKT, general contractor, ex-State 
Senator, military man and a leading Kepublican of New 
Haven, was born in that city on March 11th, 1856. His 
maternal ancestors were Scotch and his paternal ancestors came from 
England, both in early times. His father is Charles Wells Blakeslee, 
a contractor, and his mother is Martha Jane Blakeslee, a woman of 
excellent character and influence. 

From the time he was " old enough to do anything " Dennis 
Blakeslee had plenty of farm work to do, such as delivering milk on 
foot around the neighborhood and later milking the cows and caring 
for the horses. These industrious habits founded so early in life have 
been of such value to him that he believes all boys should have regular 
work to do. He read the current news with systematic intelligence 
but found little time or opportunity for reading many books. His 
education was confined to the public graded schools of his native city. 

When he was sixteen years old Dennis Blakeslee started upon his 
life work as a time keeper for his father on a contract in Bridgeport. 
He quickly learned the contractor's business in all its details and 
has spent his whole life as a general contractor. He has had many 
large and important contracts and has been most successful in his 
work which has been largely in connection with railroad enterprises. 
He is in partnership with his father and brother Clarence in the 
well-known firm of C. W. Blakeslee and Sons, Contractors, of 
New Haven. 

In 1880 and 1881 Mr. Blakeslee was a member of the New Haven 
Common Council. Prom 1884 to 1890 he was fire commissioner. In 
1906-1907 he was State Senator and re-elected in 1908-1909. He has 
always been a loyal and influential Bepublican. For twenty-five 
years he was a member of the Second Company, Governor's Horse 
Guard, eight years of that time being major commanding. 

Mr. Blakeslee is a member of the Congregational Church. He 
is not affiliated with any Masonic or fraternal orders. For an in-door 

22 




••'•• 



•: : |^^ ^-;'\^#x>:fv^S ; ^N V ; - 



DENNIS ALBERT BIAKESLEE. 25 

recreation he enjoys card playing and for out-of-doors, baseball. 
His home is at 501 George Street, New Haven, and his family con- 
sists of a wife and six children. Mrs. Blakeslee's maiden name was 
Lizzie P. Law and the date of tlieir marriage was December 4th, 1878. 
His children are Hattie F., Martha, Albert D., Harold L., Miles 
Grant and Dorothy. 

A young man, seeking true success in life, should, according to 
Mr. Blakeslee's ideas, "be truthful, industrious and careful of the 
company he goes in. He should be saving and should leave intoxi- 
cants alone. He should always be careful in making promises, but 
after once giving his word should be sure and keep it." He also be- 
lieves that as tobacco is no help to a young man and a constant expense 
it is better left alone. 

This practical and sage advice should make a strong appeal to 
others, coming, as it does, from a man who has worked hard from 
childhood, who did a man's work in youth, who had a limited educa- 
tion, and who yet won success in both business and public life through 
his own ability and efforts. 



ARTHUR F. EGGLESTON. 

EGGLESTON, AETHUK F., retired state's attorney and a 
leading lawyer of Hartford, Connecticut, for many years, who 
is popularly known as " a terror to all law breakers," was 
born in Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, October 23d, 1844. 
His parents were Jere D. and Louise Carew Eggleston. Through his 
father the Judge is a lineal descendant of Begat Eggleston, who 
emigrated from England to Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630, and 
who settled in Windsor, Connecticut, five years later. 

The life of a typical New England village was Arthur Eggleston's 
experience in early boyhood. He prepared for college at Monson 
Academy in Monson, Massachusetts, but interrupted his education 
by enlisting in the Union army at the outbreak of trie Civil War. 
In 1864 he entered Williams College, where he was graduated in 
1868. He had decided upon the legal profession in early boyhood 
and evinced increasingly that keen judgment, common sense, grasp 
of facts and thoroughness of detail that have made him widely known 
as a " natural born lawyer." After leaving college he studied law 
in the office of Strong and Buck in Hartford. 

In 1872 Arthur Eggleston was admitted to the Hartford County 
Bar and began a career of unusual distinction and success. He won 
his way speedily to the highest rank among lawyers through his own 
energies, keen insight and relentless pursuit of evil and has earned 
not only the esteem but the great gratitude of the many for his enor- 
mous part in preserving high moral standards and abolishing and 
punishing crime and vice. For thirty years he has been a member 
of the distinguished law firm of Buck and Eggleston, the senior 
member being ex-Congressman John B. Buck. For six years Arthur 
Eggleston was judge of the Hartford Police Court. From 1888 to 
1908, he was state's attorney and his work in that capacity was as 
effective and successful as his civil practice has been. In the office 
of state's attorney he was the public protector against fraud and 
evil of all kinds for a period of twenty years and his record as a terror 

26 




-Ovi^xZ^L y^2"l^ iuL^S^Z^r 




ARTHUR F. EGGLESTON. 



29 



to criminals and the defender of right and justice is one of the most 
notable and honorable ones in Connecticut's history. He has success- 
fully conducted some of the most famous, important and difficult 
cases in the legal and criminal history of our state, both as a civil 
lawyer and as state's attorney. Noteworthy among these were the 
Taylor-Tracy murder case, the Souder-Talvin murder case, and the 
prosecution of Dr. M. A. Griswold for burning the Woodbridge build- 
ing on Main Street, Hartford. His great success has been insured 
by his wonderful keenness in anticipating his opponent, sifting out 
details, seeing through deceit and weighing evidences. In his pleas 
he is sure to come quickly and forcibly to the point, to make every 
possible showing of the hard, sure facts with which he is always 
thoroughly prepared to bring home the truth with relentless precision 
and incisive straightforwardness rather than by elaborate rhetoric 
and fascinating eloquence. He knows human nature thoroughly and 
keenly and makes sharp, telling tests and shrewd cross-examinations 
that penetrate subterfuge and reveal truth and justice in the clear 
white light of actuality. 

Judge Eggleston retired from the office of state's attorney on 
June 30th, 1908, and from the active practice of law soon afterwards. 
He felt impelled to give up his practice because of ill health, and the 
finality of the step is proved by the gift of his valuable and extensive 
law library to his nephew, Eobert Eggleston. Though his retirement 
is a matter of keen regret to his associates of the bar and to the general 
public, his decline in health makes regret for his retirement give place 
to a sense of what is due to himself after so many years of public 
service and to gratitude for the great good that he has done. 

A Eepublican in politics, the judge has held some political offices, 
but he has on the whole clung to his profession with a singleminded- 
ness that made political honors and duties impossible. He was treas- 
urer of Hartford County for ten years and police commissioner of 
Hartford for three years. 

In all matters of civic betterment Judge Eggleston takes a keen 
and generous interest. He is a loyal supporter of many public philan- 
thropies. In creed he is an Episcopalian and he is a member of 
Christ Church, Hartford. 

The Judge has been twice married, first in 1870 to Mary Isabel 
Abbe, of Windsor Locks, who died in 1905. She was beloved for 



30 ARTHUR F. EGGLESTON. 

her great and substantial interest in charitable work throughout the 
city and for her unselfish efforts in behalf of the poor and suffering, as 
well as for her prominence in church work. In 1907 Judge Eggleston 
married Mrs. Ella Kendell Canfield. No children have been born to 
Mr. Eggleston by either marriage. His home is on Windsor Avenue, 
Hartford. 

Since the above went to print Judge Eggleston has passed away, 
the date of his death being November 30th, 1909. 



FREDERICK F. FUESSENICH 

FUESSENICH, FREDERICK FERDINAND, president and 
treasurer of the Hendey Machine Company of Torrington, 
Litchfield County, Connecticut, has been prominent in the 
public life of that town since his early manhood and is well known 
not only for his leadership in industrial affairs, but for his important 
part in public affairs, in legislative, banking, civic progress and 
church life in his community. He is a native of Duren, Prussia, 
where he was born May 7th, 1848. His father, Leonard Fuessenich, 
was a veterinary surgeon in Prussia and a soldier in the German 
army. He brought his family to the United States when his son 
Frederick was but four years old, and on the voyage over the wife 
and mother, Elizabeth Kolkuchen Fuessenich, died and was buried at 
sea. Upon arriving in this country the family located in Brooklyn, 
New York. In 1854 they removed to Goshen, Connecticut, and 
Frederick received his first schooling in the district schools of that 
village. In 1857, when Frederick F. Fuessenich was nine years of 
age, the family moved to Torrington (then called Wolcottville) , 
which place has been their home ever since that time. 

He attended the Torrington common schools after locating in 
that place and when he was twelve years old he went to work on a 
farm near Wolcottville, attending school during the winter term only. 
This work, though begun so early in life, was not the first manual 
labor that fell to his lot, for at ten years of age he performed duties 
at home and took care of a physician's horse outside of school 
hours. After two years of farm work he returned to Torrington 
and worked in a woolen mill for three years. During that time he 
worked twelve hours a day for wages that were paid but quarterly and 
were by no means large. He next spent sixteen years in the employ 
of Charles McNeil, druggist, whose business also embraced the tele- 
graph office, news office and post-office. 

In 1879 Mr. Fuessenich secured employment in the Hendey 
Machine Company and worked in the factory of that concern for a 

33 



34 



FREDERICK FERDINAND FUESSENICH. 



year and a half. He was one of the original stockholders of the com- 
pany and in 1883 he was elected its secretary. He soon after became 
treasurer as well as secretary, and since Mr. Hendey's death in 1906 
he has been president and treasurer of that large and progressive 
manufacturing industry. 

An alert interest in public affairs, which, in Mr. Fuessenich's 
boyhood, was evinced by a close study of current events in the news- 
papers, has borne fruit in his mature life in many public services and 
official relations. They have been both political and civic. In politics 
he is a steadfast Democrat. He was twice elected town clerk of Tor- 
rington and was a burgess of that borough from 1899 to 1905. He 
was elected state senator in November, 1902, overcoming strong ad- 
verse majorities in his town and in the district. He was interested 
in securing the charter of the electric railway from Torrington to 
Winsted in 1896 and was one of the directors of the company. He was 
identified with the organization of the Torrington Electric Light 
Company in 1886 and is still a director and secretary of the company. 
He was one of the original organizers of the Torrington National Bank 
in 1899 and a director of that bank. 

Mr. Fuessenich is junior warden of Trinity (Protestant Epis- 
copal) Church, Torrington, and is greatly interested in the spiritual 
and material prosperity of that church. He is a director of the local 
Young Men's Christian Association. He is a member of Seneca Lodge 
No. 55, F. and A. M., and was treasurer of the lodge for twenty-one 
years. He is also a Knight Templar, being affiliated with Clark Com- 
mandery. He is a member of the Church Club of Connecticut, and 
vice-president of the Torrington Club. He is fond of outdoor sports 
but has led too busy a life to admit of the cultivation of any " hobby." 
He believes that men should be willing to perform the tasks set before 
them, take a deep interest in local affairs, and to view them from the 
standpoint of a good citizen, rather than a narrow partisan. His own 
life exemplifies not only this principle but the true worth of an in- 
dustrious, upright and unselfish life and of the value to this country 
of those men who leave their fatherland and by native vigor, brains 
and perseverance, become loyal and influential American citizens. 

In 1876 Mr. Fuessenich married Elizabeth C. Blake of Essex, 
Connecticut. Six children, all now living, have been born of this 
union. They are Mabel Blake, Leonard Cleveland, Hervey Blake, 
Frederick William, Henry Hendey, and Elizabeth Celia. 





'cUj^u£cL 



GEORGE A FAIRFIELD. 

FAIBFIELD, 6E0EGE ALBEBT, late secretary of the Hartford 
Board of Trade, was for half a century one of the leading busi- 
ness men, financiers, manufacturers and civic workers of that 
city as well as one of its most honored and useful citizens in many other 
capacities. He was born in Lansingburg, New York, on March 20, 
1834, and died in Hartford, November 9th, 1908. 

Ephraim W. and Eva Anna Burns Fairfield, Mr. Fairfield's par- 
ents, were natives of New York State but his father was of old New 
England ancestry and his mother was of Dutch-Scotch descent. The 
family moved to western Massachusetts when George was but four 
years old. There he was brought up a typical New England farmer 
and, as soon as he was old enough, had his share of farm work to do. 
He attended the local public schools until he was seventeen years old 
when his mother's death broke up the family, and he began his real 
life work as apprentice in the silk machine shop of Lucius and Ira 
Dimock in Northampton, Massachusetts. After two years of this 
work the firm sold out and young Mr. Fairfield went to work for the 
Holyoke Machine Shop, and, though only just out of his teens, he 
received the highest wages paid to any machinist in that shop. He 
also worked as a mechanic for similar concerns in Ohio and Virginia. 
While working for Wilcox and Gwyne of Urbana, Ohio, he con- 
structed the first power metal planer ever built west of the Alleghanies. 
In 1854 he became foreman of the tool department of Entwisle and 
Moore, engine builders of Alexandria, Virginia. 

During the period of the Crimean War he worked for the Eobins 
and Lawrence Company, of Windsor, Vermont, who made guns for the 
English government and after that he became special designer of labor 
saving machinery for the government armory in Springfield, Mass- 
achusetts, being identified with the American Machine works of that 
city. It was then that he became an expert draughtsman as well as a 
skilled mechanic. His drawings of labor saving machinery at the 
United States Armory were used in the construction of machines which 

37 



38 GEORGE A. FAIBFIELD 

were shipped south and were subsequently destroyed in the Civil 
War. 

In 1857 Mr. Fairfield came to Hartford and entered the Colt 
Patent Fire-arms Manufacturing Company to work on a contract to 
furnish the Eussian government with the most advanced machinery 
for the manufacture of firearms. He soon became the largest con- 
tractor at Colt's. He had been in Hartford but a year before he 
opened the first school devoted to mechanical drawing ever established 
in that city. In this school many of Connecticut's best engineers have 
been trained to excellence in mechanical achievement. 

At the close of the Civil War, Mr. Fairfield took a needed vacation 
from business and built his fine home on the avenue which bears his 
name. He did much to permanently beautify a long neglected resi- 
dence section of Hartford. In 1865 he resumed active business life by 
entering the Weed Sewing Machine Company and accomplished so 
much for the development of that industry that he was made its sec- 
retary. By constructing improved machines under numerous patents 
taken out by himself and assigned to the Company, he made the Weed 
machine so popular that the company's output soon amounted to twelve 
hundred thousand dollars a year. In August, 1876, he was elected 
president of the company and held this office until he resigned in 
1881 having been mechanical engineer, secretary, superintendent and 
chief executive of the concern. Meanwhile he had founded the Hart- 
ford Machine Screw Company of which he afterwards became the 
executive head, and the chief promoter. He was president of this 
company for many years. He was also instrumental in the inception 
and development of the Pope bicycle industry, this important step 
being the result of a meeting with Colonel Albert A. Pope of Boston 
when the two distinguished manufacturers decided to bring to Hart- 
ford that, its most important, industry. 

After resigning from the presidency of the Weed Company in 1881 
Mr. Fairfield assumed the active management of the Hartford Machine 
Screw Company, a large concern which grew out of the department in 
the Weed Company. A branch concern, known as the Western Auto- 
matic Machine Screw Company was established at Blyria, Ohio, with 
Mr. Fairfield as director and president. 

After many years devoted to manufacturing Mr. Fairfield retired 
from active connection with manufacturing industries several years ago 



GEORGE A. FAIRFIELD 



39 



and devoted the last years of his life to civic duties and honors, to 
financial interests, and to the directorship of the many banking, rail- 
road and business institutions in which he was prominent. In 1870 
he became a trustee of the Mechanics Savings Bank and in 1899 he 
was elected its vice-president. He was a director of the Hartford 
National Bank from 1892 until the time of his death. In that capa- 
city he was concerned in the leading financial interests of Hartford, 
and his honest policy, his conservative financiering, prudence and keen 
ability made him a frequent representative of important financial 
interests. Not long before his death he went to Chicago to act for the 
stockholders of the Illinois Central Eailroad in which he was the larg- 
est stockholder in this vicinity. He was a director in the Hartford 
Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company, the Hartford County 
Fire Insurance Company, the two banks above mentioned and the 
Western Automatic Machine Screw Company. He was a leading 
stockholder in the New York, New Haven and Hartford railroad, the 
Pennsylvania Eailroad and many other prosperous corporations. He 
was a director and vice-president of the Cedar Hill Cemetery Associa- 
tion of Hartford. 

Mr. Fairfield was a director of the Hartford Board of Trade from 
the time of its organization, and was secretary of that board from June 
7, 1907, until the time of his death. He was always a zealous worker 
in the municipal development of his city and was long identified with 
the city government. He was an energetic member of the city park 
board for twelve years, and president of that board in 1901. He was a 
prominent Bepublican and recently declined nomination for represen- 
tative owing to the already great demands upon his limited strength. 
In his younger days he served his city three times as councilman. 

A thorough and enthusiastic traveler, Mr. Fairfield enjoyed an ex- 
tended European trip during which he was received by many men of 
distinction, and took part in court life abroad. At the time of the 
Vienna Exposition in 1873 he represented American manufacturing 
interests and made a six months' sojourn in Vienna. 

In appreciation of his many inventions for the improvement of 
sewing machines, Mr. Fairfield was chosen to write up and illustrate 
the industry at Vienna. His research covered all countries and was 
published by the State Department at Washington in 1875. One of 
the results of this important work was the medal awarded to Mr. 
Fairfield by Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria. 



40 GEORGE A. FAIEFIEIJ) 

In spite of his great success and prosperity, George A. Fairfield re- 
tained his modest, straightforward, candid manner and his simple 
tastes. He was a man of gTeat strength of character, even disposition 
and delightful geniality. He took a great interest in the schools and 
Sunday-school, and did as much for the moral and educational as for 
the industrial and civic welfare of his city. A courteous acquaintance, 
a warm-hearted friend, a wise counsellor, a public spirited civic ser- 
vant, and an able and progressive manufacturer and business man, 
George A Fairfield was a valuable and exemplary citizen whose place 
no one can ever quite fill. A man of virility of mind and body, he 
loved life and lived it wisely and fruitfully and successfully, meeting 
its close bravely and serenely. 

A wife, a son, and a daughter survive Mr. Fairfield. His wife 
was Frances C. Moore when he married her in 1855, daughter of 
Charlotte and Kelson Moore. His daughter is now the wife of 
William Stanton Andrews, assistant cashier of the Hartford National 
Bank. The son is George E. Fairfield. 




_--. ...-.-. tSr 




2£^H 




WILLIAM WALDO HYDE. 

HYDE, WILLIAM WALDO, lawyer, ex-mayor, public man 
and a leading Democrat of Hartford, was born in Tolland, 
Connecticut, on March 25th, 1854, the son of Alvan Pinney 
and Francis Elizabeth Waldo Hyde. His father is well remembered 
as one of the most successful and distinguished members of the 
Connecticut bar of the last generation as well as a man well loved for 
his optimistic, sociable and frank personality and admired for his 
keen, logical intellect and honorable dealings with his fellow men. 
On his side William Waldo Hyde is descended from eminent New 
England families, including William Hyde of Norwich and the old 
Hyde family of Stafford. On his mother's side Mr. Hyde traces his 
ancestral line to Elder William Brewster and to the Averys and 
Eldredges of Groton, who bore important parts in the Kevolution. 
His mother's father was Judge Loren P. Waldo of the Superior Court 
of Connecticut and the incumbent of many other political offices of 
influence and importance. 

Until he reached the age of ten years William Waldo Hyde lived 
in the village of Tolland and attended the district schools of that 
town. His family then moved to Hartford and he attended the 
grammar schools there and prepared for college at the Hartford 
Public High School, completing the course in 1872. He chose Yale 
University for his alma mater and received his B.A. degree from that 
institution in 1876, in the same class as Arthur T. Hadley and many 
other notable men. 

After leaving college Mr. Hyde spent two years in the study of 
law, one in his father's office at Hartford and one at Boston Univer- 
sity Law School, and was admitted to the bar at Hartford in 1878. 
Immediately after his admission to the bar he entered the well-known 
law office of Waldo, Hubbard and Hyde in Hartford, of which firm 
his grandfather and father were members. 

This firm has undergone many changes due to deaths of its 
members, and is now styled Gross, Hyde and Shipman. The almost 

43 



44 WILLIAM WALDO HYDE. 

unrivalled prestige enjoyed by this old and successful law firm is in 
no small degree due to the efforts, ability and character of Alvan P. 
Hyde and his worthy 6on, William Waldo Hyde, now a strong factor 
in the firm's success and high reputation. 

Always keenly and unselfishly interested in public affairs, Mr. 
Hyde has taken especial interest in public education. He was for 
some years a member of the school board and was acting school visitor 
for six years. This position involved untiring labor and careful 
judgment and was filled by Mr. Hyde with rare thoroughness and 
success. For many years also Mr. Hyde was president of the local 
board of street commissioners. From 1892 to 1894 he was mayor of 
Hartford and in that capacity acquitted himself with great tact and 
credit, having always at heart the best interests of the people. He 
is an ardent and consistent Democrat but has held few offices of a 
strictly political nature. 

William Waldo Hyde is a member of the Mayflower Descendants, 
the Society of Colonial Wars, the Sons of the American Eevolution, 
the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained to the thirty-second 
degree, the Improved Order of Eed Men, Washington Commandery, 
Knights Templar, the Hartford Club, the Hartford Golf Club, the 
Farmington Country Club, the University Club of New York, the 
Yale Club of New York, the Graduates Club of New Haven, and the 
Nayassett Club of Springfield, Mass. He is a member of the South 
Congregational Church. 

In 1877 Mr. Hyde married his high school classmate, Helen 
Eliza Watson, daughter of the late George W. Watson of Hartford. 
Two children have been born of this union, Elizabeth, born 1878, 
and Alvan Waldo, born 1880; also two grandchildren, Helen Waldo 
and Elizabeth Howard, twin daughters of Alvan Waldo Hyde, born 
October 22d, 1906. 




,/ 




FRANK KIRKWOOD HALLOCK. 

HALLOCK, PKANK KIKKWOOD, M.D., A.M., medical direc- 
tor and proprietor of Cromwell Hall, the health school for 
nervous invalids at Cromwell, Middlesex County, Connecticut, 
one of New England's most successful nerve specialists and one of the 
leading physicians in his state, was born at Oyster Bay, Long Island, 
on August 18th, 1860. His father was the late Dr. Winthrop B. Hal- 
lock, whom he succeeded as head of Cromwell Hall and whose career 
is sketched elsewhere in this book. On his father's side Dr. Prank 
K. Hallock traces his ancestry to Peter Hallock, who emigrated from 
England in 1640 and landed at Halloek's Neck, Long Island, while 
on the maternal side he is descended from John Kent, who was born 
in England and came to Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1645. 

The Kent family has been a noted one in the annals of New 
England. Dr. Halloek's great-grandfather, William Austin Kent, 
was one of the foremost citizens of New Hampshire, and his brother, 
Edward Kent, was governor of Maine. General Lafayette made his 
headquarters at the home of the former in Concord during his visit 
to New Hampshire in 1824 and his son, Colonel William Kent, com- 
manded the militia which escorted him through the state. 

His mother was Mary Kirkwood Kent Hallock and her influence 
on his moral and spiritual life was as strong and lasting as his father's 
was on his intellectual life and on the choice of his profession. Other 
important factors in shaping his mental tendencies in youth were 
exerted by the reading in which he took such an intelligent and con- 
stant interest, the influence of the works of Emerson and Wordsworth 
being particularly strong. 

As his father was a physician and army surgeon, Dr. Halloek's 
youth was spent almost entirely in hospitals and institutions and in 
a variety of localities. He prepared for college at the Middletown 
High School, as his father was then assistant physician at the Con- 
necticut Hospital for the Insane. He graduated from high school in 
1877, the year in which his father founded Cromwell Hall. He then 

47 



48 



FRANK KIRKWOOD HALLOCK. 



entered Wesleyan University in Middletown, where he received his 
A.B. degree in 1882 and his A.M. degree in 1885. During the same 
period, from 1882 to 1885, he took the medical course at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, where he received his M.D. 
degree in 1885. 

The next four years after he obtained his medical degree, Dr. 
Hallock spent in still more advanced professional study, consisting 
of two years of hospital service as interne of the New York Hospital, 
and two years of study abroad under the leading specialists of Europe. 
Thus he spent eleven years in study and preliminary experience before 
actually settling down to the practice of his profession. 

In 1889, on his return from Europe, Dr. Hallock located in 
Cromwell Hall as his father's assistant, being at that time in his 
twenty-ninth year. In 1896 he persuaded his father to change the 
policy of the institution by eliminating the insane and thus limiting 
the admission of patients to nervous and general invalids. The new 
plan proved most satisfactory and for a number of years Cromwell 
Hall was the only institution of its kind in the state not receiving 
insane cases. This radical change was the first step in the develop- 
ment of a unique institution, probably the first of its kind in this 
country. In addition to the hygienic treatment afforded by the ordi- 
nary sanatorium, Cromwell Hall gives a system of outdoor living 
guided by " plain-talk " psychotherapy which is virtually an educa- 
tion along both mental and physical lines. It is truly a health school. 
Since his father's death in the autumn of 1898, Dr. Hallock has been 
medical director and proprietor of this successful institution for the 
treatment of nervous invalidism. 

Dr. Frank K. Hallock was one of the founders of the Middlesex 
Hospital of Middletown. He was secretary of that hospital from 
1895 to 1907 and is still a director of the institution. Under Gov. 
Coffin he served as examiner in lunacy and under Gov. Eoberts he 
served as a member of the commission to establish an epileptic colony 
under state control. He is a member of the State Medical Society, 
the American Medical Association, the American Neurological Asso- 
ciation, the Alumni Association of the New York Hospital, the New 
York Neurological Society, the New York Academy of Medicine, the ; 
Boston Society of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science. 



FRANK KIRKWOOD HALLOCK. 



49 



For many years Dr. Hallock has been a director of the Cromwell 
Dime Savings Bank. He was elected president of that bank in 1903 
but resigned in 1907 to respond more fully to the pressure of profes- 
sional duties. He is a director of the Cromwell Cemetery Association 
and president of the Belden Library Association of Cromwell. For 
seventeen years he served on the Cromwell School Board, first as 
secretary and then as chairman. He is a member of the Middletown 
Club, the University Club, Yacht Club, Arawana Golf Club, and 
Middlesex County Historical Society, all of Middletown, and of the 
Psi Upsilon Club of New York and the Graduates' Club of New 
Haven. He is a member of Washington Lodge, No. 81, A. F. and 
A. M. Since 1894 he has been an honorary member of the Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternity of Wesleyan University. In politics he is a Eepub- 
lican. He is an enthusiastic advocate of outdoor recreation and 
especially enjoys yachting and camping. 

On May 7th, 1890, Dr. Hallock married Kate Camp Avery of 
Boston, Massachusetts. Five children have been born of this union: 
Winthrop Avery, Abraham Avery, Mary, Leonard Avery and Elizabeth. 



WINTHROP BAILEY HALLOCK. 

HALLOCK, WINTHKOP BAILEY, M.D., late physician and 
surgeon, founder and first proprietor of Cromwell Hall, 
Connecticut's famous health school for nervous invalids, was 
born in Utica, New York, on February 2d, 1838, and died on 
September 24th, 1898. He was a direct descendant of Peter Hallock, 
who came from England and settled at Hallock's Neck, Long Island, 
in 1640. Another early ancestor, the one for whom Dr. Hallock was 
named, was the Kev. Winthrop Bailey of Deerfield, Massachusetts. 
The parents of Dr. Winthrop Bailey Hallock were Samuel Titus and 
Sarah Bailey Hallock. His father was a lawyer who was circuit 
judge at Meadville, Pennsylvania. 

Parm chores and other duties and pleasures of country life filled 
Winthrop B. Hallock's time in boyhood. After a suitable preparatory 
education he entered medical college and received his M.D. degree 
in 1864. Prom 1862 to 1865 he was a medical cadet and surgeon in 
the United States Army, being stationed at various hospitals, in- 
cluding the Long Island Hospital. He also served in the professional 
capacity in Central Park, at David's Island and at Fortress Monroe. 

In 1867 Dr. Hallock became first assistant physician at the 
Connecticut Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. After ten years 
in that hospital he resigned in 1877 and established Cromwell Hall, 
at Cromwell, Connecticut. This famous institution was first intended 
for the treatment of nervous and mild mental disorders and was the 
second private sanatorium in the state. The policy of the institution 
was changed in 1896, after which only nervous and general invalids 
were admitted and for a number of years Cromwell Hall was the 
only institution of its kind in Connecticut which did not treat mental 
cases. Dr. W. B. Hallock remained at the head of the Hall until 
his death, in September, 1898, after which his son, Frank K., assumed 
the management, as is related in his sketch in this book. 

Dr. W. B. Hallock married Mary Kirkwood Kent in 1859 and by 
this marriage had a son, his successor, Frank K. Hallock, and a 
daughter, Mrs. William P. Couch, who survive him. 

50 



PHINEAS HENRY INGALLS. 

INGALLS, PHINEAS HENRY, M.D., M.A., physician and sur- 
geon and one of Connecticut's foremost gynecologists, is a resi- 
dent of Hartford, where his large and successful practice of 
medicine and surgery centers, and where he is well known in social 
and church circles as well as in professional organizations. He is the 
son of Dr. Phineas Ingalls, a physician, and Ruth Elder Ingalls. 
His grandfather, the first Phineas Ingalls, was an early settler of 
Maine and a soldier in the Revolutionary War. A still earlier paternal 
ancestor was Edmund Ingalls, who emigrated from England and 
settled in Massachusetts, where the city of Lynn now is, about 1621. 
Through his mother Dr. Ingalls is descended from the Elder and 
Mosher families, who settled in Maine about 1730 and were direct 
descendants of Josias Cook, who came over in the May-flower. They 
were the original settlers of the little town of Gorham, Cumberland 
County, Maine, where the doctor was born on April 18th, 1856, and 
where his early boyhood was spent. 

After completing the rudimentary education of the village school 
of Gorham, Phineas H. Ingalls entered the High School in Portland, 
Maine, where he prepared for college. He next entered Bowdoin 
College, where he was graduated with the degree of A.B. in 1877. 
The following three years he spent in the study of medicine, both in 
the offices of prominent Portland physicians and in courses at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New 
York, where he was graduated with the degree of M.D. in 1880. 

Immediately after receiving his medical degree, that is, in March, 
1880, Dr. Ingalls began the active practice of his profession as house 
surgeon of the Woman's Hospital in New York. In March, 1882, he 
settled in Hartford, which has been his home and the center of his 
eminent practice ever since that time. Since 1884 he has been visiting 
gynecologist to the Hartford Hospital. In 1885 his alma mater, 
Bowdoin College, bestowed upon him the well-merited honorary degree 
of A. M. It was in 1885 also, on May 13th, that Dr. Ingalls married 
8 53 



54 



PHINEAS HENEY INGALLS. 



Mary Helen Beach, daughter of J. Watson Beach of Hartford. In 
June, 1886, a son, Phineas, was born, who died in infancy. 

Since locating in Hartford Dr. Ingalls has been very active and 
prominent in matters connected with his profession and in more gen- 
eral affairs. In 1883 he was appointed assistant surgeon of the 
Connecticut National Guard and was promoted to adjutant in De- 
cember, 1884, and to brigade inspector in 1890. He resigned in 1892. 
From 1895 to 1899 he was on the city board of police commissioners. 
Dr. Ingalls is a member of many organizations — professional, 
fraternal, social and patriotic. These include the city, county and 
state medical societies, the American Gynecological Association, and 
Alumni Association of the Woman's Hospital of New York, the Delta 
Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, the Bowdoin Alumni Association, the 
Sons of the Eevolution, the Society of Colonial Wars, the Hartford 
Club, the Country Club, and the Hartford Yacht Club. He is a 
Eepublican in political allegiance. In creed he is an Episcopalian 
and is a member and supporter of Christ Church, Hartford, and 
greatly interested in the development of the church. Golf and travel 
are his favorite recreations. He has made several trips abroad and 
counts them as the best possible relaxation from a strenuous practice. 
Early in his professional career as a gynecologist, Dr. Ingalls 
began to contribute to the literature of his special branch of medicine 
and surgery and his reputation as a writer is as great and as fruitful 
in the advancement of his line of work as are his successful practice 
and surgical achievements. Chief among his medical papers are the 
following: "Non-Surgical Treatment of Anteflexion" (published 
in the New York Medical Journal in 1886) ; "Damages of Parturi- 
tion and their Eepairs " ; " Uterine Cancer " ; " Sloughing Fibroids 
of the Uterus " — Proceedings of the American Gynecological Society 
in 1891 ; " Successful Cases of Caesarian Section," American Journal 
of Obstetrics, 1892. His surgical operations have been numerous 
and signally successful, many of them being of great importance to 
the development of surgical gynecology. Nearly twenty-five years of 
hospital and private practice, together with rare surgical skill, facility 
in diagnosis and thoroughness in all his work, have made Dr. Phineas 
H. Ingalls highly successful and widely honored as a physician and 
surgeon and he is justly regarded as the leading gynecologist of his 
community. 




■■■■ -■ _-" Bra 




^£^?^ 



GEORGE HENRY KNIGHT. 

KNIGHT, GEORGE HENRY, M.D., M.A., physician, state 
representative, and superintendent of the Connecticut School 
for Imbeciles at Lakeville, Litchfield County, is a native 
and lifelong resident of that village. He was born there on November 
24th, 1855. His father, Dr. Henry Martin Knight, was a most skillful 
and competent physician, who held for many years the position now 
occupied by his son. He was member of the State Legislature in 1856. 
His wife, the present Dr. Knight's mother, was Mary Fitch Phelps 
Knight. To her George H. Knight still attributes the strongest and 
best influences upon his life. The Knight family is a very old and 
honorable one and dates back to the sturdiest English stock and the 
staunchest New England settlers. 

The two absorbing interests of George H. Knight's boyhood were 
farm work and school work. He attended the local schools until he 
was ready for college. He then entered Yale University with the 
class of 1877 and took two years of the course. He afterward studied 
medicine at the University Medical College in New York and received 
his doctor's degree in 1880. (His degree of M.A. is an honorary one 
conferred upon him by Yale University in 1902.) 

As soon as he had completed his medical course, Dr. Knight 
accepted the superintendency of the State Institute for Feeble Minded 
Children at Faribault, Minnesota. After his father's death he was 
urged to assume control of the School for Imbeciles at Lakeville, 
which he did in 1885. He has acted in this capacity ever since with 
the utmost devotion and success. He is widely honored not only for 
being an able physician, but still more for the untiring devotion 
which he gives to a work as difficult and self-sacrificing as it is noble 
and necessary. He gives himself solely to the work and has few 
outside ties. He is a Republican in politics and represented Salis- 
bury in the Legislature in 1907 and 1909. He attends the Congre- 
gational Church. For outdoor recreation he enjoys tennis and golf. 
On September 16th, 1879, Dr. Knight married Kate M. Brannon 
of New York City. They have one child, Gertrude M. Knight. 

57 



GEORGE ALBERT LEWIS. 

LEWIS, GEORGE ALBERT, president of the Beacon Falls 
Rubber Shoe Company and of the Naugatuck National Bank 
and one of Naugatuek's most successful and prominent busi- 
ness men, was born in Sharon, Litchfield County, Connecticut, Feb- 
ruary 11th, 1843. His parents were Samuel J. and Mary E. Lewis. 
His father, a leading citizen of Naugatuck, was the organizer of 
the Goodyear Metallic Rubber Shoe Company of that place and its 
president until his death in 1858. He was a man of unusual ability, 
perseverance and energy and his character exerted a strong influence 
on his son's life, perhaps all the stronger because the boy's mother 
died when he was but seven years old. On the paternal side Mr. 
Lewis is descended from Jean Louis, a French Huguenot, who was 
knighted for bravery on the battlefield by Henry of Navarre. He 
left his native country for Sandwich, England, and later came to 
America on the ship " Hercules " in 1635. He then adopted the 
English spelling and became John Lewis. Mr. Lewis' maternal pro- 
genitor in this country was William Lewis, who came from England 
to Boston on the ship " Planter " in 1632 and afterwards settled in 
Farmington, Connecticut. 

Delicate health and a tendency to pulmonary trouble debarred 
the boy George Lewis from many youthful pleasures and activities. 
His physician ordered an out-of-door life and he spent all of his 
vacations from the ages of twelve to fifteen on a farm, doing regular 
work as well as enjoying much play and sport as he began to grow 
stronger. He learned the advantages of routine work and was ready 
to do whatever came to hand and to do it well. From the time he 
was seven until he was ten he attended a boarding school in New 
Haven and the following six years he studied in the schools of Nauga- 
tuck, including the High School. He then entered the Colton School 
in Middletown, intending to prepare for Yale, but delicate health 
obliged him to abandon the idea of a college course. 

His start in business came early in 1860 soon after he left school 

58 




\ Hi 

'- -.' --■: .-T --' Wt/fama S- Srr /V>" 



h 



<^o ■ Of 




<Z^t^Kj-r^S 



GEORGE ALBERT LEWIS. 61 

and in a most interesting and indicative way. After his father's 
death young Lewis was put under the guardianship of his uncle, 
Thomas Lewis, a large woolen manufacturer and president of the 
Tuttle Manufacturing Company. It happened that Mr. Moses Camp, 
one of the proprietors of the largest store in Winsted, had a business 
appointment with Mr. Thomas Lewis at the Tuttle Manufacturing 
Company's office at Union City, and when Mr. Lewis arrived he was 
accompanied by his young ward, George A. Lewis. During the inter- 
view the office fire needed attention and the lad replenished it so deftly 
and quietly that Mr. Camp was greatly attracted to him and as a 
result, upon his return to Winsted, spoke of the incident to his brother, 
Mr. Caleb Camp, then managing partner of the firm of M. & C. J. 
Camp and Company. He sent for young Lewis and at the interview 
arrangements were made for him to enter the employ of the firm, 
thus giving him precedence over a long list of applicants. He served 
a three years' apprenticeship with the Camps, at the end of which he 
left to serve as clerk to Captain Bradley D. Lee, commissary of sub- 
sistence during the Civil War. In 1864 Mr. Lewis joined Captain 
Lee in Washington and went with him to Harrisburg, where they 
remained several months. 

Upon coming of age Mr. Lewis came into possession of a com- 
fortable fortune left by his father, but he was determined to prove 
himself independent of an inherited competence and sought employ- 
ment in the Goodyear Metallic Eubber Shoe Company organized by 
his father. He was enrolled as a bookkeeper in that company in 
December, 1864, and gave ten years of diligent and faithful service 
in that capacity. At the end of that decade its manager was failing 
in health, and in consequence the financial condition of the company 
began to decline. Mr. Lewis was then made treasurer and manager, 
and afterwards, upon the death of Gov. English, became president 
of the company. He held this office until 1898, when he became 
president of the Beacon Falls Eubber Company, his present responsible 
position. In 1883, when the Naugatuck National Bank was organized, 
Mr. Lewis' business ability and integrity received further recognition 
by his being offered the presidency of that bank and he has been 
annually re-elected to that office ever since. 

Mr. Lewis has never had time or desire for political honors, but 
is a loyal and consistent Bepublican. He is a Knight Templar though 



62 



GEORGE ALBERT LEWIS. 



no longer active in Masonic affairs. He has been a member of the 
Union League Club of New York since 1879. He is an active member 
and liberal supporter of the Congregational Church. His one fad is 
riding and driving and he understands and enjoys a good horse. He 
has been twice married, in 1867 to Emma Francis Lewis, a daughter 
of Thomas Lewis of Naugatuck, by whom he had one son, Tracy S. 
Lewis, now treasurer and general manager of the Beacon Falls Eubber 
Company, and in 1900 to Harriet Frances Eossiter, daughter of 
Stephen Farley Eossiter of Claremont, New Hampshire. By this 
second marriage he has one child, George Albert Lewis, Jr. 

It is to the excellent business training under Mr. Caleb Camp 
that Mr. Lewis attributes his first incentives to succeed in life. With 
that start and by attention to details, perseverance, application and 
strict honesty he has made his way to the top. In his own words, 
" Close application to business with straightforward methods is about 
the only way to win." 






SZX? 



WALTER S. LEWIS. 

LEWIS, WALTEE S., at the time of his death the oldest and 
most prominent merchant in Torrington, Conn., was born 
in New Haven, February 21st, 1833, son of Charles and Eliza- 
beth (Bradley) Lewis, respectively natives of New Haven and East 
Haven. The Lewis family is of Welsh origin. The grandfather, 
Charles Lewis, who was a farmer in Southington, Connecticut, where 
other members of the family settled at an early date, spent most of 
his active life in that town, passing his last years practically retired 
in New Haven, where he died at the age of 97 in 1868. 

Charles Lewis, the father of Walter S., followed the sea for a 
livelihood, as captain of a coasting vessel. He also retired to New 
Haven in his old age and died there in his seventy-third year. He 
was three times married. His first wife, who was a member of the 
large family of William Bradley of East Haven, died in New Haven 
at the age of 34. She was the mother of four children, one of whom 
is living, namely, Henry, a bit manufacturer. 

Walter S. Lewis, left motherless when he was four years old, 
was taken care of by his grandfather and aunts. He received a good 
education, attending the city schools and studying at the Lancastrian 
School of John E. Lowell. In December, 1849, when he was sixteen 
years of age, he went to work as a clerk for A. G. Bradford of Tor- 
rington, who kept a country store, where he remained for five years. 
In 1855, with a partner, he started a general store in the Granite 
Block. At that time Torrington was a small village with few stores 
and little competition. After spending ten years conducting this estab- 
lishment, he purchased his partner's interest and removed to the Allen 
House, later returning to the granite building, where he remained five 
years. He then moved into the building which he occupied during the 
remainder of his life, a two-story structure 125 feet deep and 45 feet 
wide, specially erected by him to meet the demand of his business. 
When he first opened here he had a fine stock of groceries, dry goods, 
clothing, h**ots and shoes and notions; but in 1891 he disposed of all 

65 



"? WALTER S. LEWIS. 

but the dry goods and carpet lines, buying direct from the New York 
and Boston markets. Mr. Lewis had been in business 40 years, and 
was consequently at the time of his death the oldest merchant in that 
town, as well as one of the oldest in the country. He had seen Tor- 
rington grow from a small village to a flourishing manufacturing 
place. His business kept pace with Torrington, holding its own 
through many changes and entitling him to be ranked with the leading 
merchants of the place, though the number of his competitors was 
yearly increasing. His store was the finest in the town and one of 
the largest and finest in that part of the state. Mr. Lewis was also 
a stockholder and director of the Excelsior Needle Company and the 
Torrington Electric Light Company, a stockholder in the Torrington 
Water Company, the Union Hardware Company, and the Eagle 
Bicycle Company* 

On November 29th, 1855, Mr. Lewis was united in marriage 
with Mary J. Wooding of Torrington. Her father, who was a farmer 
in Torrington, died at the age of 74. His wife, who was a native 
of New Hartford, died at the home of her daughter, aged 74 years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis had two children, both of whom received a liberal 
education. They were Lizzie W. and Charles W. The former attended 
the seminaries at Bye and Pittsfield. She is the wife of Wm. Mertz, 
who is now the proprietor of the store previously conducted by her 
father. Charles Lewis attended the Cheshire Military Academy and 
a commercial school at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He was engaged in his 
father's establishment but has now retired. 

In politics Mr. Lewis was a Democrat. He was always actively 
interested in the growth of the town, and filled many offices, serving 
for some time as a warden of the borough. He was a Congregation- 
alist in religion. He was a man who commanded the respect of all 
who knew him. His death occurred on April 16th, 1897. 




±-.? !-<.££ &F/&*™ <$£f* JW 




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CHARLES DELOS RICE. 

RICE, CHAELES DeLOS, superintendent of the Underwood 
Typewriter Company and mechanical inventor, is one of 
Connecticut's foremost manufacturers as well as a leader in 
municipal, social and business life in Hartford. He was born in 
Auburn, Cayuga County, New York, on April 15th, 1859, the son of 
Benjamin and Harriet Malvina Bridges Eice. 

As his father was a school teacher and his mother a woman of 
keen intellect and high ideals, Charles Eice had every incentive to 
self-culture and naturally formed studious habits in youth. Although 
the family circumstances necessitated his leaving school at the early 
age of twelve, he continued studies of personal choice for many years 
thereafter. Even earlier than that, at the age of eight, in fact, he 
had regular tasks to perform, which stimulated ambitions toward 
substantial accomplishments that have been of lasting benefit to 
him. 

Following the bent of his early preference for scientific study 
and experiment, his first work in life was of a mechanical nature and 
began in 1871 when as a twelve year old boy he did routine or repeti- 
tion work in an Auburn factory. He subequently went through with 
every stage of factory work, becoming trained mechanic, foreman, 
mechanical engineer and superintendent. After engaging in the 
various classes of mechanical pursuits for sixteen years he went to 
Bridgeport, Connecticut, to act as foreman in the factory of the Yost 
Writing Machine Company. Three years later, in 1890, he became 
chief engineer for the Pope Manufacturing Company. In 1901 he 
went to Bayonne, New Jersey, to be general superintendent of the 
Underwood Typewriter Company. Upon his farsighted suggestion the 
plant of the Underwood Company was moved to Hartford that same 
year, the step being engineered to completion through Mr. Eice's 
capable personal management. The standing and the products of the 
Underwood Typewriter Company are too well known to be restated 
here and proclaim for themselves the business ability, mechanical 

69 



70 



CHARLES DELOS RICE. 



knowledge and industrial prominence of its successful superintendent. 

Since 1888 Mr. Eice has taken out many valuable patents per- 
taining to machinery and devices for the manufacture of metal parts 
included in bicycles and typewriters. These comprise forging 
machinery, gear cutting machines, drilling machines and many other 
mechanical contrivances of great use and importance. Mr. Eice's 
interest in mechanical progress and industrial growth is by no means 
confined to his own industry, for he is an active member of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation of Hartford County, and the Hartford Business Men's Asso- 
ciation. He has been second and first vice-president of the last named 
and vice-president and president of the Manufacturers' Association of 
Hartford County. He has also been a member of the Hartford Board 
of Trade. 

In 1906 Mr. Eice served his city as common councilman. At 
present he is a member of the board of school visitors. He is a Eepub- 
lican in politics and a member of the Eepublican Club of Hartford. 

Socially Mr. Eice is a member of the Hartford Club, the Auto- 
mobile Club of Hartford, and the Society of the Cayugas of New 
York City. He is a Mason. In cTeed he is a Congregationalist and 
is a member of the Farmington Avenue Congregational Church. He 
is a devotee of outdoor life and finds automobiling his most pleasur- 
able recreation at the present time, though formerly he enjoyed base- 
ball, bicycling and driving. His family consists of a wife and one 
child, though two have been born to him. Mrs. Eice was Anna C. 
Hoagland when he married her on Christmas Day, 1882, and their 
daughter is Harriet Edna Eice. 

Although, in his singleness of interest, Mr. Eice gives advice 
particularly to young men who are carving their way in factories, it 
is sagacious enough and practical enough to appeal to all who earnestly 
seek the way to success from one who has used it to open the doors 
wide. In his own words: "A young man, when entering factory 
life with ambitions to rise, should, in order to excite interest on 
the part of those who may have to do with his future advancement, 
maintain good habits and abstain from profanity or the doing of 
things which are distasteful in the sight of right thinking men and 
he should also show an eagerness to do and to learn. This, coupled 
with the practice of observing closely the methods of others who are 



CHARLES DELOS RICE. 71 

expert in whatsoever kind of work it is, will afford plenty of substance 
for reflection and mental training and will quite naturally serve to 
engage him in practices both mentally and otherwise, which will 
attract the notice of those above him and which will surely result in 
his advancement from time to time (provided, of course, he possesses 
fair natural ability and tact to start with) . After maturity and when, 
through proper training and accomplishments, a substantial reputa- 
tion is established, such service as might be rendered by such a person 
is always in demand." 



ISAAC ALMARIN ALLEN, JR. 

ALLEN, ISAAC A., Jr., architect, of Hartford, Connecticut, 
was born in Enfield, Connecticut, May 22d, 1859. He is the 
only son of Isaac Almarin and Harriet Jane (Carrier) Allen. 
Of his four sisters, but one is now living, Elizabeth Ingraham (Allen) 
Burns, wife of Louis Burns of Pittsfield, Mass. His father is a well- 
to-do farmer of Enfield, and his grandfather, Chauncey Allen, was 
an extensive farmer and dealer in leaf tobacco, who died at the age 
of eighty-nine, leaving a large property. Isaac Allen, brother of 
Chauncey, moved from Enfield to Clarkson, Monroe County, New 
York, and became a prosperous farmer there; at the age of eighteen 
he was a colonel in the War of 1812. On his mother's side Mr. Allen 
is a descendant of John Hancock, the first signer of the Declaration 
of Independence. His great-great-grandmother was a sister of the 
three brothers Hancock, who brought a bushel of silver dollars from 
England, with a portion of which they bought from the Indians what 
is now the township of Wethersfield. His grandfather on his mother's 
side was Omri Gates Carrier, son of Omri and Bebeckah (Parsons) 
Carrier. His mother's mother, Harriet A. (Potter) Carrier, was a 
descendant of Captain Ephraim Pease, who entertained General 
George Washington at his home in Enfield. His father's mother, 
Mary (Pease) Allen was also a descendant of Captain Ephraim Pease. 
From the above we see he is a scion of good old New England stock, 
hence his industrious, enterprising, ambitious characteristics. 

He lived at home on his father's farm and attended the Enfield 
and Thompsonville High Schools, until the age of twenty, when he 
went to New Haven and learned the carpenter's trade with the con- 
tracting firm of Kinney & Phelps. He became an expert workman 
and was given charge of the work on many large buildings. He 
6pent many of his evenings until late at night drawing plans of build- 
ings with a view to entering an architect's office. From 1879 to 1886 
his business compelled him to change his place of residence, and he 
worked at New Haven, Glen Island, New York, Stony Creek, Ansonia, 

72 





6L-tZi^t^ 




ISAAC ALMARIN ALLEN, JR. 



75 



Bridgeport, and other towns. In January, 1884, he entered the archi- 
tectural office of David E. Brown of New Haven, Conn., and stayed 
about one year. There being but little work in the office at that time, 
he returned to work at his trade. In 1886 he returned to Enfield, at 
his father's request, and built several buildings, also at times working 
on his father's farm. In March, 1889, he re-entered the architectural 
office of David R. Brown of New Haven. One year later he secured 
a position with Frederick S. Newman, architect, at Springfield, Mass. 
So marked was his progress, that in 1891 his employer sent him to 
open a branch office in Philadelphia, which was later Mr. Newman's 
main office. In 1893 Mr. Newman sent him to Hartford, Connecticut, 
to superintend the construction of the Ballerstein Building, and at 
the same time to open a branch office. Three years later he bought 
out Mr. Newman's interest there and has since conducted the business 
himself. His success was assured from the start, for he had an advan- 
tage over others in his business, in that he was lavishly endowed with 
natural talent for the work in which he engaged. He has planned 
many of the city's stores, business buildings, factories, banks, apart- 
ment houses, engine houses, residences, etc., etc. Up to the present 
time he has furnished plans and specifications for nearly seven hun- 
dred different buildings in Hartford, neighboring towns and states. 

A few of the most prominent ones built or remodeled are Sage- 
Allen & Company's store and office buildings, and those of Jerome 
E. Sage, Brown, Thomson & Company, Wise, Smith & Company, 
G. Fox & Company, C. S. Hills & Company, Henry Kohn & Sons, Wm. 
G. Simmons Corporation, Chas. Dillon, Hills Block, Goodwin Drug 
Company, Phoenix National Bank, Hartford Fire Insurance Com- 
pany's addition, Connecticut Fire Insurance Company, Underwood 
Typewriter factories, Johns-Pratt Company's factories; Hartford 
Bubber Works, Hartford Courant office, Northeast School, Southwest 
School, B. Ballerstein residence, Mary R. Storrs residence, I. Wise 
residence, E. C. Linn residence, Connecticut Literary Institute, 
Suffield, Conn., Allyn House, Hartford Opera House entrance, Par- 
sons Theatre entrance, S. S. Sanford Building, Bridgeport, Conn., 
and hundreds of others. 

Mr. Allen was married September 9th, 1890, to Mary Elizabeth 
Willson of Thompsonville, Conn., daughter of Daniel Sumner and 
Nancy (Gaylord) Willson. They have three children : Willson, born 



76 



ISAAC ALMABIN ALLEN, JE. 



in Enfield, August 17th, 1891 ; Charles Almarin, born in Hartford, 
June 23d, 1894; Grace Elizabeth Allen, born in Hartford, June 25th, 
1898. 

He is a member of St. John's Lodge, No. 4, A. F. and A. M.; 
Pythagoras Chapter, No. 17; Wolcott Council, No. 1; Washington 
Commandery, No. 1, K. T. ; Connecticut Sovereign Consistory, S. P. 
E, S.; a noble of the Mystic Shrine in Sphinx Temple; Sphinx 
Temple Band; Oasis Club; Hartford Business Men's Association; 
Hartford Board of Trade, and Putnam Phalanx. 





^Z^€r^ 



WILLIAM DAVID JOHNSON. 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM DAVID, architect, of Hartford, was born 
in Staffordville, Tolland County, Connecticut, on November 
- 13th, 1863. His parents were David E. Johnson and Moranda 
Colburn Johnson. After acquiring an elementary education in the 
local district schools and two years at Woodstock Academy, he went 
to New Haven to prepare for college in the New Haven High School. 
He graduated from this school in 1884 and then entered Sheffield 
Scientific School of Yale University, where he was graduated from 
the department of mechanical engineering in 1886, receiving the prize 
for scholarship in that department. 

The first five years after he left Yale, Mr. Johnson spent as a 
civil engineer in the employ of the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Eailroad. At the end of that time, that is, about seventeen years 
ago, he gave up engineering and began the practice of architecture 
with Mr. T. Alden Curtis, under the firm name of Curtis and Johnson. 
In the profession of architecture he has had marked success and his 
talent is evinced in practical qualities as well as in artistic taste. 

Most of Mr. Johnson's work has centered in and around Hartford 
and his office is in that city. He is president of the corporation, formed 
in April, 1908, and known as W. D. Johnson, Incorporated, Archi- 
tects. In 1905 he was chosen to design a large number of buildings 
and apartments for the American Eeal Estate Company of New 
York and this extensive undertaking necessitated his opening a branch 
office in New York. He maintained this office for nearly three years, 
but since the completion of this co mm ission he has deemed it both 
wise and necessary to devote all of his time to his Hartford office. 

The buildings which Mr. Johnson has designed amount to over 
five hundred in number and include schools, theatres, residences, 
churches, missions and hospital. He has been special architect for the 
Connecticut Hospital for the Insane for about fifteen years, and has 
designed all of the newer buildings of that institution. Some of his 
important contracts have been the following : Congregate dining hall, 

79 



80 



WILLIAM DAVID JOHNSON. 



seating 1,600, and theatre, seating 1,400, for the Connecticut Insane 
Hospital; High School, and H. G. Hubbard School, Middletown; 
Holbrook Street and Gordon Street schools, Ansonia; First District 
School, Bristol; Northwest and Arsenal District schools, Hartford; 
Memorial Baptist Church, City Mission, and Open Hearth Mission; 
organ case of the Fourth Congregational Church, Hartford; chapel 
of the first Congregational Society in Connecticut, at Windsor ; chapel 
of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Middletown; Murray Department 
Store and City Hall, Ansonia; residences of Hon. Geo. P. McLean, 
Simsbury, T. McDonald Russell and Clarence Bacon, Middletown, 
Major C. B. Andrus, Hartford. 

His designs are always carefully adapted to the surroundings, 
practical in their detail of construction and capable of execution 
within the financial limits set by his patrons, a rare characteristic of 
truly artistic architects. He enjoys great advantage in being an 
engineer and an architect, as all of his buildings bear substantial 
witness. 

Mr. Johnson is a member of the Connecticut Society of Civil 
Engineers, of the Baptist Social Union of Connecticut, and the Hart- 
ford Baptist Union; of the Yale Alumni Association of Hartford, 
and of the National Geographical Society of Washington, D. C. He 
is a member of the First Baptist Church. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican and an advocate of conscientious voting and clean politics. 

On December 15th, 1887, Mr. Johnson married Miss Carrie L. 
Webster. One child, a son, Roy Webster Johnson, has been born of 
this union. Mr. Johnson makes his home in Hartford the year around 
but his work extends all over the state and through a still wider terri- 
tory, for some of his finest buildings are in New Jersey and New 
York states. His offices are at No. 26 State Street, Hartford, and 
his residence is at 174 Bond Street, Hartford. 



GEORGE WALDO CORBIN. 

CORBIN, GEORGE WALDO, deceased, was an ex-mayor of New 
Britain, president of the Union Manufacturing Company, of 
the Corbin Brothers Company, and of the People's Savings 
Bank, treasurer of the Corbin-Church Company and of the Dean 
Steel Die Company, and a prominent participant in public affairs. 
He was born in New Britain on March 4th, 1859, and died there 
November 30th, 1908. His father was Waldo Corbin, one of the 
brothers who were early associated in the organization of the Corbin 
manufacturing industry in New Britain, having been a partner in the 
firm of P. & F. Corbin from 1852 to 1872. His ancestry is traceable 
through many generations back to Robert Corbin of Normandy and 
embraces many distinguished Englishmen and early Americans. 
Among the latter were early colonists and town officials and one 
valiant soldier who served in King Philip's War. The first American 
ancestor was Clement Corbin, who emigrated from England in 1637, 
and settled in New England at Muddy River, which is now called 
Brookline, Massachusetts. Excellent educational advantages were 
open to George Corbin in his youth, and his was a mind that sought 
and profited by every advantage. He attended the local grammar 
and high schools and then took a course at Wesleyan Academy, 
Wilbraham, Massachusetts. 

In 1878, at the age of nineteen, he left school and entered the 
hardware industry of which his uncle, Philip Corbin, was the organ- 
izer and head. It was only natural that his mind should turn in 
the industrial direction, for New Britain is primarily a manufactur- 
ing city, and the P. & F. Corbin establishment is one of the greatest 
of its kind in the world. The young man, fresh from college, nephew 
of the famous manufacturer, could easily have taken some high posi- 
tion in the firm had he wished to begin life in a post secured only by 
influence. But George W. Corbin was not that kind of man. He was 
of the self-reliant type, creative, enterprising, powerful and conscious 
of his power; a man who would have won his own way in any part 

4 83 



84 



GEORGE WALDO CORBIN. 



of the world in any calling. He was thorough, and realized that 
to master the business he must begin at the bottom. So, instead of 
taking an easy chair in the office, he went to work in the factory, like 
any other new apprentice and toiled through the several years needed 
to learn the business, starting first as a time keeper. The men above 
him recognized his ability and, to further test his qualifications as 
well as reward his efforts, they gave him a place on the road when 
he felt that he was ready for it. He was endowed with a remarkably 
pleasing personality and that charm of a quick wit, which never 
stings. He had a well developed social side, was genial and had a 
fund of good stories which favorably installed him in the good graces 
of a customer. These qualities opened the road to success which he 
attained by his accurate knowledge of the business and his rare 
sagacity. He represented a large house in a large way, and, traveling 
as he did, all over the country, he soon established a reputation and 
following in all of the big trade centers of the United States, a repu- 
tation which could justly be called national. Naturally he concen- 
trated attention still more strongly upon the hardware business, in 
which his entire family was interested, and with his highly developed 
qualifications and unusual strength of character he became a very 
important factor in the upbuilding of the Corbin Cabinet Lock Corn- 
company, which was established as a separate company in 1882, of 
which George W. Corbin was manager, secretary in 1896, and then 
president until 1908. 

Having brought the company to such a prosperous and sure- 
footed state that it no longer depended upon his personal leadership, 
and being opposed to its pending consolidation with the American 
Hardware Company, he left the company. He reorganized the Union 
Manufacturing Company, of which he became president and which 
immediately and consequently entered upon a period of splendid 
growth and prosperity. Mr. Corbin built a new plant, installed new 
equipment, and infused into the organization a spirit of progress that 
tended to the rapid expansion of the business. His great success in 
this executive work encouraged Mr. Corbin to form other manufac- 
turing corporations. These were the Corbin Brothers Company, the 
Dean Steel Die Company, and the Corbin-Church Company, in all 
of which his official rank has already been stated. All have been 
successful because their inceptor was master of the industrial problems 



GEORGE WALDO CORBIN. 



85 



and had financial backing that few other men have been able to 
command. The rare loyalty of the men who were so fortunate as to 
be chosen by him as fellow officers in the new industries was due not 
only to their confidence in Mr. Corbin's splendid ability and sound 
sense, but equally to the strong ties of devotion to a man who was 
not only a strong leader but a genial comrade, a generous friend, and 
a noble man. 

Mr. Corbin's business ties outside of the Corbin industries were 
many and important. He was instrumental in establishing the Peo- 
ple's Savings Bank of New Britain, and was one of its officers. He 
was a director of the New Britain Savings and Loan Association, 
and in the New Britain Eealty Company. He was a trustee of the 
New Britain Trust Company. He was a member of the New Britain 
Business Men's Association. 

In municipal politics Mr. Corbin was a prominent figure. He 
first served his townsmen as a member of the common council and 
later as a fire commissioner. He was one of the leaders of the Ee- 
publican party in New Britain, but believed in the best man for any 
position rather than in extreme partisanship. In 1894 he was 
elected mayor of New Britain by 207 votes, after an exciting cam- 
paign against the Citizens' party, the " local Tammany." Mr. Corbin 
discharged the duties of mayor faithfully and capably, as well as 
independently. He refused renomination and all further political 
honors until 1906, when he was unanimously nominated for state 
senator, but was defeated by his Democratic opponent. He took an 
active part in the work done by the city school board up to the time 
of his death. 

Though his greatest pleasure was in home life, Mr. Corbin had 
many social ties and was a member of many clubs and societies. He 
was a thirty-second degree Mason and was a member of Harmony 
Lodge, F. and A. M. ; Washington Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Sphinx Temple, Mystic Shrine; Phoenix Lodge, I. 0. 0. P.; St. 
Elmo Lodge, Knights of Pythias; New Britain Council, 0. U. A. M.; 
Mattabassett Tribe, 0. B. M. ; Washington Camp, P. 0. S. of A., and 
Chamberlain Council, Jr. 0. H. A. M. He was a member of the 
New Britain Club, the Hartford Club, the Hardware Club of New 
York, Maple Hill Golf Club, the Kenilworth Club, and the Seneca 
Club. His eloquence, rare sense of humor and popularity made him 
a much sought after speaker on social occasions. 



86 GEORGE WALDO CORBIN. 

In spite of his multitudinous business and social interests Mr. 
Corbin was devoted to his home life, and his domestic associations 
were very happy and dear to him. On October 17th, 1883, he was 
married to Miss Lean Harriet Kelley, daughter of Henry E. and 
Sarah J. Kelley. They had four daughters, all of whom survive 
him: Florence May, Helen Emily, Euth Kelley and Constance 
G'eorgiana. He also leaves two brothers : William H. Corbin. state 
savings and loan commissioner; Albert F. Corbin, vice-president of 
the Union Manufacturing Company; and a sister, Miss Adele Corbin. 



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ANDREW NELS PIERSON. 

PIERSON, ANDREW NELS, floriculturist, proprietor and 
manager of the greenhouses at Cromwell, Middlesex County, 
Connecticut, is one of the successful citizens of the Nutmeg 
State who was born in a foreign land. His birthplace was the 
town of Stro, Skone County, Sweden, and the date of his birth was 
September 1st, 1850. His parents were Nels Pierson, a teacher, 
and Hannah Pierson, both noble minded, religious people who exerted 
a marked influence upon their son's intellectual and moral develop- 
ment. 

Andrew N. Pierson's early boyhood was spent in the country. 
He attended the local school until he reached the age of ten and after 
that time he was obliged to confine his school attendance to evening 
classes. Between the ages of ten and fourteen he earned his bread 
as a shepherd boy, and at fourteen he began his apprenticeship as a 
florist. He was fond of reading whenever the chance offered, and was 
a devoted student of the Bible, which is still his best loved and most 
used book. 

He came to America in 1869 and located first in the town of 
Southington, Connecticut, where he resided for about two years. In 
1872 Mr. Pierson engaged in a florist's partnership at Cromwell, his 
associate being B. B. Barber. After six years he began business for 
himself and was sole proprietor until 1908, when his well known 
floricultural business became incorporated. He has built up a business 
second to none both for the quantity and quality of the flowers handled. 
His success as a florist is due not only to his fine business methods, 
admirable management, and strict integrity, but also to his intense 
love and personal interest in flowers and their culture. Floriculture 
is not only his life work but his greatest pleasure in life. At the 
time his business was incorporated his establishment was the largest 
of its kind east of Chicago, and its growth continues with increasing 
rapidity. 

The qualities he deems most essential to success are temperance, 

89 



90 



ANDREW NELS PIEKSON. 



industry and frugality. Add to these singleness of purpose and loving 
concentration to one's life work and we have the secret of his success. 

On March 29th, 1876, Mr. Pierson was married to Margaret 
Stewart Allison, daughter of William P. Allison and Emily Miller 
Allison, of Middetown, Connecticut. Four chidren have been born of 
this union of whom two are now living: Wallace E. Pierson, who is 
associated with his father in the management of his extensive business; 
and Emily M. Pierson, who was graduated at Vassar College and 
afterwards took a postgraduate course in Columbia University. 

In religious convictions Mr. Pierson believes in " the atonement 
sacrifice of Jesus Christ; that death (extinction of being) is the pen- 
alty for sin; that Jesus was made a little lower than the angels (a 
perfect man) for the suffering of death, thus tasting death and meeting 
the claims of divine justice for every man. This secured for every 
human being an opportunity through enlightenment and a trial, to 
attain everlasting life on the human plane. The church is constituted 
of those who in this Gospel age become enlightened respecting God's 
plan and who, through faith in the atonement sacrifice pass from the 
divine sentence of death unto life; and by consecration give up the 
attainment of everlasting life on the human plane, to secure, through 
following in the footsteps of Christ unto death a divine nature and a 
heavenly inheritance with Christ their head. The judgment or trial 
day of the church is during the whole of the gospel age. This grand 
feature of the divine plan will be followed by a thousand-year day, 
when a full knowledge of God's purposes for man will be granted to 
every human being. At the beginning of this period, the Old Testa- 
ment overcomers will be resurrected to perfect human conditions; 
and before it is over, the residue of mankind will have been awakened 
from death, brought to an accurate knowledge of the truth, as con- 
tained in the Holy Scriptures, and be given an opportunity, through 
trial, to obtain everlasting life in the earth made like Edenic Paradise. 
This great judgment, or trial, day will be under the divine govern- 
ment centered in the divine Christ and the glorified church. All 
the wicked or incorrigible — those who refuse to come into harmony 
with the divine government — will be destroyed in the second death." 

He has had these views the last ten years, and accredits this 
belief to a work called " Studies in Scripture," issued at Brooklyn 
Tabernacle, Brooklyn, N". Y. 




r .-" " r '-'■■-■ " -" ' "" 




CHARLES TERRY TREAD WAY. 



TEEADWAY, CHAELES TEEEY, president of the Bristol 
National Bank, treasurer of the New Departure Manufactur- 
ing Company, treasurer of the Horton Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and a director in a number of Bristol's leading industries, is 
also a leader in political, social, educational and religious affairs of 
that town. He represents a family which has been prominent in 
the industrial life of Connecticut for many years and includes many 
distinguished names. His great-great-grandfather was Eli Terry, 
Senior, the pioneer of the clock industry in this state. Mr. Tread- 
way's father (whose biography appears in Volume 2 of this work) 
was Charles Seth Treadway, late banker, manufacturer, state repre- 
sentative and treasurer of the town of Bristol, in whose footsteps in 
the paths of business success and good citizenship he has closely fol- 
lowed, especially in his position as president of the Bristol National 
Bank. Mr. Treadway's mother was Margaret Terry Treadway, who 
died in his infancy. He was born September 8th, 1877. 

He was of a studious, thoughtful nature and desired and obtained 
a thorough and advanced education. He completed elementary 
courses at the Federal Hill School in Bristol in 1891 and then took 
the full course at the Bristol High School, graduating in 1895. He 
also did a year of college preparatory work at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, in 1895 and '6. He then entered Yale University, where 
he was graduated in 1900 with the degree of B.A. He then spent 
six months traveling abroad. 

In December, 1900, Mr. Treadway entered upon his business 
career as treasurer of the New Departure Manufacturing Company of 
Bristol, which office he still holds. After his father's death in 1905 
he was elected vice-president and director of the Bristol National 
Bank. After the death of Edward B. Dunbar in May, 1907, Mr. 
Treadway was elected president of the bank and had the distinction 
of being the youngest bank president in Connecticut, being then under 
thirty years of age. In executive ability and experience and sagacity 

93 



94 



CHARLES TEEBT TREADWAT. 



in matters of finance he was as mature as many far older men and 
had the advantage of an unusual training under his capable father. 
Mr. Treadway is interested in many other corporations of 
importance in the business life of Bristol, being treasurer of the 
Horton Manufacturing Company and a director in the following 
organizations: The Bristol Water Company, the Bristol and Plain- 
ville Tramway Company, the Bristol Brass Company, the American 
Silver Company, and the Bristol Manufacturing Company. He was 
one of the incorporators of the Bristol Savings Bank. 

For four years Mr. Treadway was secretary of the Bristol High 
School Committee. He is at present chairman of the Republican 
Town Committee and has done splendid work in strengthening that 
party. He is a member of Franklin Lodge, F. and A. M., of Pequa- 
buck Chapter, R. A. M., of Ionic Council, E. and S. M., of Washing- 
ton Commandery, K. T., No. 1, of the Sphinx Temple, Mystic Shrine, 
of the Yale Club of New York, the Graduates Club of New Haven, 
and the Farmington Country Club. He is a loyal and devoted mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church, being bred in the faith of that 
body. He is fond of outdoor life in many forms and is an enthusiastic 
devotee of golf, walking, horseback riding and automobiling. 

Mr. Treadway's family consists of a wife and two sons, named 
Charles Terry Treadway, Jr., and Graham Richards Treadway. His 
marriage took place on June 4th, 1902, and his wife's maiden name 
was Isabella Graham Richards. 

Few men make their mark in the world as early in life as Charles 
T. Treadway. The secret of his success lies in his guiding principle 
of life and is of particular interest to young men coming from one 
of their own age. Mr. Treadway says : " In my mind one principle 
ever stands preeminent as our guide to success as American citizens 
and more especially is this principle important with a young Ameri- 
can. He should stand unswerving in his loyalty to all those things 
which make for the betterment of social, ecclesiastical or material 
conditions. He should be at once loyal to employer and employee, 
to church, home and state and perhaps more than all to every truly 
American ideal." Mr. Treadway has found great help and benefit 
from private study and reading of economical treatises, financial and 
corporation histories and sociological literature, which have helped 
to fit him for leadership in the industrial and banking world and he 



CHABLES TEEEY TEEADWAT. 95 

has also derived much culture and profit from the study of English 
literature. All this goes to show that diligence, industry and judicious 
use of time and talent in accordance with high ideals and firm purpose 
may win the prize of success and of place and power, at an age when 
many men are still apprentices in their chosen work. 



CARLYLE FULLER BARNES. 

BARNES, CARLYLE PULLER, treasurer of the Wallace Barnes 
Company, president of the C. J. Root Company, and vice- 
president of the Bristol Savings Bank, is also burgess of the 
borough of Bristol, Hartford County, Connecticut. His lineage is 
ancient and distinguished on both sides of the family, for he is a 
descendant of Thomas Barnes, who emigrated from England to 
Farmington, Connecticut, about 1660, and of Edward Puller, who 
came to Massachusetts in the famous Mayflower. Mr. Barnes' parents 
were Wallace and Eliza Fuller Barnes. His father was a well-known 
manufacturer, founder of The Wallace Barnes Company, of Bristol, 
Connecticut, who held no public office except that of fire commis- 
sioner. 

Bristol was a village at the time of Carlyle P. Barnes' boyhood. 
He was born there on December 11th, 1852, and spent his early youth 
in that town. He was educated at Williston Seminary, being a 
member of the class of 1870. 

His first work in life was in the capacity of clerk in R. F. 
Blodgett's store in Hartford. Later he spent four years in office work 
in the employ of Cheney Brothers, at their Hartford office, Morgan 
Street, where he formed true business habits that have been lasting 
factors in shaping Ms success in industrial life. 

Since leaving Cheney Brothers, Mr. Barnes has been identified 
with the clock spring manufacturing business founded and managed 
by his father and known as the Wallace Barnes Company, of Bristol. 
He is now treasurer of that company and president of the C. J. Root 
Company, of Bristol, manufacturers of brass hinges. He is vice- 
president of the Bristol Savings Bank. Mr. Barnes is a Republican 
in politics and is at present burgess of the borough of Bristol, term 
of 1907-1909. He is a member of the Pirst Congregational Church, 
of the Society of Mayflower Descendants, and of Washington Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar. He enjoys outdoor life, his particular 
hobby being salmon fishing. 




- - •- ■"■■ -- a b 



CAKLYLE FULLER BAENES. 



On October 1st, 1885, Mr. Barnes married Miss Lena Forbes, 
daughter of Samuel W. Forbes of Bristol. 

Two children have been bom to them, both now living, Fuller 
Forbes and Harry Clarke Barnes. 



CHARLES STUART CANFIELD. 

CANFIELD, CHARLES STUART, senior member of the law 
firm of Canfield, Judson & P ullm an, was born in Bridgeport, 
and has always made his home in that city. He comes of 
good old English stock. His father, Charles Edwin Canfield, devoted 
himself for many years to mercantile pursuits in Bridgeport, and 
is now living in Nebraska, engaged in farming. His mother, Caroline 
Louise Osborne, who died November 6th, 1903, was a woman of 
superior mental attainments and beautiful Christian character. A 
strict adherence to the teachings of his mother has been the aim of 
Mr. Canfield's life. 

The early education of Mr. Canfield was acquired in the public 
schools of his native city and in private schools under the supervision 
of the Rev. Guy B. Day and Warren W. Selleck, two well-known 
instructors of their day. 

Mr. Canfield, when a boy, entered the office of the late William 
K. Seeley, one of the most eminent members of the Fairfield County 
bar, and under Mr. Seeley^ able guidance was in due season admitted 
to the practice of law. 

In 1890 a law partnership was formed by Mr. Canfield and Mr. 
Stiles Judson. This partnership continued for over seventeen years 
and was recently dissolved in order to form the new firm of Canfield, 
Judson & Pullman. 

Politically, Mr. Canfield allied himself with the Jeffersonian 
Democracy, and has many times been honored by his party. He held 
the offices of city and town treasurer in his earlier years, and at 
present is a member of the park board. 

Mr. Canfield's opinions on financial matters are much sought. 
He is a director in the People's Savings Bank. Pew men are better 
adapted to social life than he. His friends are to be found in every 
walk of life. He is a leading member and ex-president of the Seaside 
Club. He is also a member of the Brooklawn Country Club, the 
Seaside Outing Club, and the Contemporary Club. 

100 




C^^^auvK^|uJli 



OHAELES STUAE.T OANFIEUD. 103 

Mr. Canfield married Miss Alice Wooster, daughter of L. T. 
Wooster of Seymour, Connecticut, who died in 1907. Two children, 
Miss Julia Stuart Canfield and Wooster Canfield, the latter at present 
a student in the Yale Sheffield Scientific School, were born of this 
union. 

On October 6th, 1908, Mr. Canfield married Mrs. Margaret E. 
Mooney. 



CHARLES KERR. 

KEKR, CHARLES, treasurer and general manager of the 
Linonine Company, ex-mayor and president of the board of 
trade of Danbury, Fairfield County, Connecticut, was born 
in Kingston, New York, August 7th, 1849. On the paternal side Mr. 
Kerr is of Scotch-Irish ancestry and on the maternal side his an- 
cestors were Dutch. His grandfather, William Kerr, came from 
Belfast, Ireland, in 1812 and landed in New York, but afterwards 
settled in Kingston, Ulster County, New York, where he taught school, 
carried on a mercantile business and with his sons established, on a 
large scale, the first blue-stone industry in this country. Mr. Kerr's 
great-great-grandfather and great-grandfather on his mother's side 
were named Davis. They came to America from Amsterdam, Holland, 
before the Eevolution and served under Washington during the War. 
Mr. Kerr's parents were John W. and Eliza Davis Kerr. His father 
was a merchant and sheriff of Ulster County, New York. His mother 
was in every way fitted for training her son, mentally and morally, 
in accordance with lofty ideals, and was a constant source of happiness 
to him. 

All sorts of duties and experiences came to Charles Kerr in his 
boyhood, which was spent in the city of Kingston, New York. He did 
many odd bits of work in early youth. He was educated at the local 
common schools and the Kingston Academy. After leaving school 
he went to work in Kingston as a bookkeeper. He was under-sheriff 
of Ulster County, New York, from 1875 to 1878 and from 1878 to 
1883 he was engaged in manufacturing books, stationery and blank- 
books. 

In 1883 Mr. Kerr went West to act as general store keeper and 
purchasing agent for the Canadian Pacific Eailroad, then engaged on 
road construction from Medicine Hat, Northwestern Territory, to 
Revelstoke, British Columbia. He was occupied with this undertaking 
for three years, at the end of which time he returned East and 

104 



CHARLES KERR. 



107 



conducted the lime and stone business at Marlborough, New York, on 
the Hudson River. 

In the fall of 1888 Mr. Kerr located in Danbury, Connecticut, 
where he spent twelve years in the drug business. His interest and 
success in the chemical part of the drug business encouraged him to 
establish himself in the manufacture of that line of goods, which 
he did in 1900. He was elected treasurer and general manager of the 
Linonine Company of Danbury, his present office. For over ten years 
he has been president of the Danbury board of trade. In March, 
1897, he was elected mayor of Danbury and served until March, 1899, 
when he was reelected and served for another period of two years. 

Mr. Kerr is a Democrat in his political faith. In creed he is an 
Episcopalian. For recreation and relaxation he enjoys brisk walking 
and deems it the most sensible form of exercise. His home is at 135 
Deer Hill Avenue, Danbury, and his family consists of a wife and 
one daughter. Mrs. Kerr's maiden name was Elizabeth Preleigh, who 
also comes of old Holland stock on both paternal and maternal sides, 
one of her ancestors, Professor Preleigh, being one of the founders 
of Rutgers College, New Jersey, and the date of their marrirage wa& 
February 9th, 1881. 



ROBERT PARKER LEWIS. 

LEWIS, ROBEET PAEKEE, secretary and treasurer of the 
Blake and Johnson Company of Waterbury, manufacturers 
of piano and organ hardware, screws, rivets, etc., and builders 
of metal working machinery, is one of the leading Eepublicans of 
that city and the present president of the Waterbury Business Men's 
Association. His paternal ancestry embraces three generations of 
soldiers: Nathaniel Lewis in the colonial service; Capt. Nathaniel 
Lewis, who enlisted early in the Revolution and served throughout 
the war, and Major Horatio Gates Lewis, who commanded the battery 
at the Battle of Stonington, August 9th and 10th, 1814. All of these 
brave men were descendants of John Lewis, recorded in Westerly as 
early as 1661. On the maternal side Mr. Lewis is descended from 
John and Dorothy Bill, whose names are on the Boston record of 
1639. On this side of his ancestral tree his grandparents were Elijah 
Abel Bill and Angelina Margaret Hazard Bill, the latter of the well- 
known Ehode Island family of Hazard, dating in this country back 
to 1610, and embracing legislators, a governor (of Ehode Island), a 
mayor (of Newport), and many extensive property holders. Through 
his mother Mr. Lewis is also descended from the Coggeshalls and 
through his father from the Clarks, early colonial settlers. 

The father of Eobert Parker Lewis was James Stiles Lewis, a 
wholesale and retail grocer who was connected with Elijah A. Bill 
in this as well as in the occupation of contracting for government 
dredging and railroads. Mr. Lewis' mother was Elizabeth Dwight 
Bill, whose watchful care, moral and spiritual influences and prac- 
tical lessons in thrift and common sense were of greatest value. He 
was born in Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, Eebruary 
2d, 1870, and spent his entire boyhood in the town of his birth. His 
early education was obtained at the Broadway Grammar School in 
Norwich and his more advanced education consisted of a two years' 
course at the Norwich Free Academy. At the age of nine he began 
to earn his own living by delivering morning newspapers, to do which 

108 



ROBERT PARKER IxEWIS. 



Ill 



he arose at 4.30 a. m. Later he also delivered noon and evening 
papers. It was healthy, out-of-door work and greatly strengthened a 
naturally robust constitution. He continued at it until he reached 
the age of sixteen. 

As soon as he had completed his studies at the Norwich Free 
Academy, Eobert Lewis went to work as office boy and assistant 
bookkeeper in the Norwich Nickel and Brass Works. After a year 
at this work, he availed himself of the opportunity of learning civil 
engineering in the employ of Charles E. Chandler, with whom he 
worked for four years. From Mr. Chandler's thorough methods, 
careful instruction and excellent business principles, young Mr. Lewis 
gained invaluable help and inspiration for his life work. 

In 1890 Mr. Lewis came to Waterbury to be assistant to William 
A. Brackenridge (now consulting engineer for the New York State 
Canal Commission) in preparing plans for the union passenger 
station of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Bailroad and the 
New York & New England Bailroad. After the completion of this 
work Mr. Lewis spent several months as draftsman, electrician and 
mechanical engineer in the New England Engineering Company. 
From May, 1891, to November, 1898, he was draftsman, civil and 
mechanical engineer for the Scovill Manufacturing Company of 
Waterbury and acted as special assistant to Edward 0. Goss, then 
the chief mechanical engineer of the company. In November, 1898, 
he entered the Blake and Johnson Company and became at once 
superintendent of their machinery department. In October, 1899, 
he was elected secretary of the company and since January, 1906, he 
has been secretary and treasurer with the active management of the 
company in his hands. 

Mr. Lewis is a zealous Republican and was the first president of 
the Bepublican Club of Waterbury upon its organization in the spring 
of 1907, resigning at the year's expiration. Since January, 1908, 
he has been president of the Waterbury Business Men's Association. 
He is a member of Continental Lodge No. 76, F. and A. M. ; Eureka 
Chapter No. 22, B. A. M. ; Waterbury Council No. 21, B. and S. M. ; 
Clark Commandery No. 7, Knights Templar; Doric Lodge of Per- 
fection; Ionic Council, Princes of Jerusalem; and Corinthian Chap- 
ter, Eose Croix, all of Waterbury; Lafayette Consistory, thirty-second 
degree, S. P. R. S., of Bridgeport; and Sphinx Temple, A. A. 0. N. 
5 



112 



ROBERT PARKER LEWIS. 



M. S., of Hartford; also the Connecticut Society of Civil Engineers, 
the Waterbury Club, the Waterbury Country Club, the Home Club 
of Waterbury, the Mattatuck Eod and Gun Club of Waterbury, and 
the Potatuck Fishing Club of Bridgeport. He is fond of all water 
sports, particularly yachting and all sorts of boating. He is a strong 
member of Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church of Waterbury. 

On January 17th, 1898, Mr. Lewis married Grace Bryan Stan- 
nard. Two children, Kathleen Gilbert and Eobert Stannard, have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis. 




/ 




JAMES STAPLES. 

STAPLES, JAMES, late banker, real estate dealer and prominent 
business man of Bridgeport, Connecticut, was born in Swan- 
ville, Waldo County, Maine, on January 19th, 1824, and was 
descended from Peter Staples, who settled in Massachusetts, in that 
part which is now Kittery, Maine, about 1640. His father, Hezekiah 
Staples, was a sea captain and farmer. His ancestors had been sea 
captains, and, springing from such a race, those qualities of courage, 
determination and rectitude which that vocation requires and engen- 
ders, were strongly marked in him and were transmitted to his son 
James. His mother, Elizabeth Treat, was a typical New England 
mother of that day. Industrious, high minded and sympathetic, a 
good manager, as shown by her having the responsibility during her 
husband's absences at sea of conducting a large farm and bringing 
up a family of twelve children, she endowed her son with qualities 
which contributed largely to his success in life. 

Mr. Staples spent his youth in Swanville, working on his father's 
farm in summer and attending school in winter, until he was fourteen 
years old. He then went to the high school at Searsport, Maine, 
for three terms, for two terms to the academy in Belfast, Maine, and 
for one term to a school at Hyannis, Maine. Desirous of having a 
college education, he qualified himself in the required studies and at 
the age of seventeen was prepared to enter, but too close application 
to his studies had undermined his health and he was compelled to 
forego the realization of this ambition. After this great disappoint- 
ment he accepted a position as teacher and until he was twenty-five 
he taught school in winter and managed his father's farm in summer. 
After that time for four years he taught continuously in Belfast, 
Maine. In this line of work he was preeminently successful and 
throughout his life held the profession of the teacher in the highest 
esteem as one of the noblest and most useful of avocations. 

In 1851 he married Harriet H. Shirly, daughter of Hugh Shirly. 
In the following year his wife and their infant died, and during that 
year three of his brothers were lost at sea and another seafaring 

115 



116 



JAMES STAPLES. 



brother died in the West Indies. These repeated blows affected his 
health and led him to leave his native state, give up his chosen profes- 
sion and go to Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

In 1854 he embarked in the lumber business in Bridgeport, enter- 
ing into copartnership with S. C. Mckerson, under the name of Staples 
and Mckerson. The firm did a prosperous and growing business and 
the future looked bright and promising, when the terrible crash of 
1857 swept over the country and, with thousands of others, the firm 
was forced out of business. 

In 1859 Mr. Staples opened a real estate office in Bridgeport, 
the first one in the city. His great energy and ability soon put him 
on the road to success, and he became the leading agent and one of 
the best and most consulted authorities on real estate in Bridgeport. 
In his later years, after he had attained a full measure of success, 
he was wont to say of this trying period of his career, " My friends 
told me I could not earn enough to season my food. I told them I 
was brought up in Maine and never had it very highly seasoned and 
I would take my chances." 

In 1863 the business of fire insurance was added, Mr. Staples 
associating his brother George A. with him under the firm name of 
J. and G. A. Staples. In 1874 a banking department was opened 
under the name of Staples and Company, and placed in charge of 
Thos. B. Crutenden, one of the copartners. 

In 1884 the firm of James Staples and Company, bankers, insur- 
ance and real estate agents, was formed. The members of the firm 
were James Staples, Philip L. Holzer and Frank T. Staples, the last 
named being the only son of James Staples by his union with Sarah 
Elizabeth, the only daughter of Andrew and Sarah (Turney) Trubee 
of Bridgeport, Conn., whom he married in 1858. The business of 
the firm prospered to such a degree that larger offices were required 
and in 1892 a fine banking house, known as the Staples Bank Build- 
ing, was erected on the corner of State and Court Streets, where the 
firm, one of the principal business houses in the city, is now located. 

Mr. Staples was a man of strong character. Honest, fearless, 
sagacious, positive, industrious, faithful to his engagements, ready to 
take responsibility and endowed with a clear intellect, he mastered 
the problems of life and rose to the highest ranks of usefulness and 
distinction in his community. With him to decide was to act, and 
once started on a course of action he pursued it with a singleness of 



117 

JAMES STAPIiES. " ' 

purpose, an indefatigable energy and a tireless persistence that assured 
the certain accomplishment of his object. And yet withal he was a 
man of genial disposition, kindly nature, a human sympathy and 
generous responsiveness to the needs of suffering humanity that caused 
his presence to shed sunshine and won for him the respect and affec- 
tionate regard of his associates. 

He took an intense interest in the upbuilding of his city and the 
welfare of its people and was ever ready to devote himself to their 
service. He was one of the incorporators of the Board of Trade and 
as chairman of the executive committee of that organization he held 
the position that he most desired in that it enabled him to do the 
greatest possible amount of work in advancing the interests and growth 
of Bridgeport. Surrounded and aided on that committee by such men 
as P. T. Barnum, Nathaniel Wheeler, David M. Bead and Frank 
Armstrong, he gave a notable impetus to the city's development into 
one of the chief cities of the state. 

True to his early tendency, he was particularly interested in the 
schools of his town and became a member of the Board of Education 
on its formation and served on that board for many years. 

In politics he was a Eepublican and ardently supported the prin- 
ciples of that party, though he never desired office. In 1900, at the 
earnest solicitation of his friends who wished to do him honor, he 
consented to represent Bridgeport in the Legislature and he was elected 
by a handsome majority. As a member of the House he displayed that 
same interest and forceful activity on behalf of measures affecting 
his city that he did in private life, and never feared to express the 
approval or opposition his judgment dictated. He had the distinction 
of being the oldest member of the Legislature. 

He was a total abstainer from the use of intoxicating liquors, 
and tobacco. He lived simply and unostentatiously and was devoted 
to his family, yet he loved the society of his fellows and was a member 
of the Seaside Club from its organization. His humor and ability as 
a story teller made him a delightful companion. 

In religious belief a Universalist, he was a faithful member of 
that denomination. His faith was immovable in the doctrine of the 
fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man and this faith was a 
living force in his daily life. 

He died February 28th, 1903. The world is better because he 
lived. 



THOMAS DAVISON CROTHERS, M.D. 

CROTHERS, THOMAS DAVISON, M.D., president and medi- 
cal superintendent of Walnut Lodge Hospital, Hartford, 
former assistant superintendent and physician of the New 
York State Inebriate Asylum, and also former superintendent of 
Walnut Hill Asylum, Hartford, has given the greater part of his life 
to the study and treatment of inebriety, and has a world-wide reputa- 
tion for his successful work in this special branch of medical science. 
Dr. Crothers was born September 22d, 1842, in West Charlton, 
Saratoga County, New York, the son of Robert and Electra (Smith) 
Crothers. Paternally he is a direct descendant of a noted family 
of surgeons, who have been prominent teachers in the Edinburgh 
(Scotland) University for over a century. On his mother's side he 
comes from the Holmes family, of Stonington, Connecticut, and the 
Smiths of Westchester, New York, both of which families were honor- 
ably represented in the French and Revolutionary wars. 

In early boyhood Thomas Crothers worked on a farm. After 
earning money for his college course by teaching school in New York 
and New Jersey he entered Eort Edward Institute and in 1863 the 
Albany (New York) Medical College. Meanwhile in 1862 he entered 
the hospital department of the United States army, where he spent 
two years. In 1865 he was graduated from the Albany Medical Col- 
lege, thus gaining an M.D. degree to crown his experience as an army 
cadet and a medical student. During the same year he took a post- 
graduate course at the Long Island Hospital and at Bellevue College. 
He then located in Galway, N. Y., where he began to practice his 
profession in 1866. In 1870 he removed to Albany, and from 1873 
to 1875 he was clinical assistant and lecturer in the Albany Medical 
College, while from 1872 to 1874 he was on the editorial staff of 
the Medical and Surgical Reporter of Philadelphia. In 1875 he was 
appointed assistant superintendent and physician of the New York 
Inebriate Asylum, Binghamton, New York, and in 1878 was made 
superintendent of the Walnut Hill Asylum at Hartford, Connecticut. 

118 




T 




wyvCw 



THOMAS DAVISON CROTHERS, M.D. 121 

Since 1875 he has been secretary of the American Association for 
the Study and Cure of Inebriates, and since 1876 he has been editor 
of the Journal of Inebriety. On November 21st, 1900, Dr. Crothers 
was elected professor of diseases of the brain and nervous system in 
the New York School of Clinical Medicine. 

In 1880 Dr. Crothers organized the Walnut Lodge Hospital, a 
private corporation for the medical treatment of alcohol and opium 
inebriates, of which he has since been president. In 1890 he was 
elected secretary of the American Temperance Association and editor 
of the Bulletin, that society's chief organ. Dr. Crothers is a member 
of the British Medical Society, The French Society for Psychological 
Kesearch, the English Psychical Society, the Belgium Society of 
Mental Science, the American Association, and others. 

In 1887 Dr. Crothers was one of the American delegates to the 
international congress for the study of inebriety at London, England. 
The British Society honored him with a public dinner on that occa- 
sion and he received many other testimonials of appreciation for his 
achievements. For many years the doctor has been a prolific and 
authentic writer and a popular lecturer on different phases of 
inebriety, and his views have been the subject of much interest and 
controversy. In 1888 and 1889 he delivered a course of lectures before 
the students of the Albany Medical College and the Vermont Uni- 
versity, at Burlington, and in 1893 he edited the work on " Diseases 
of Inebriety," which was published by Treat and Company of New 
York. His editorship of the Journal of Inebriety has given it a 
national reputation among the scientific periodicals of the day, and 
his private hospital has attracted widespread attention and treats 
patients from all parts of the United States. In April, 1899, he was 
made vice-president of the international congress which was held 
at Paris for the purpose of preventing alcoholic abuses. On June 
16th, 1900, he delivered the historical address on the medical study of 
the alcoholic question before the World's Temperance Congress at 
London, England. In 1904 Dr. Crothers published the first medical 
text-book on morphomania, which has been followed by a second 
edition and is still a leading authority. 

In 1906 Dr. Crothers was appointed one of the three lay repre- 
sentatives of the United States to the Anti-alcoholic Congress at 
Stockholm, Sweden. He is now president of the American Editors' 



122 THOMAS DAVISON CROTHERS, M.D. 

Association, the national association of all the medical editors in the 
United States. 

In 1878 Dr. Crothers was married to Mrs. Sarah B. Kysedorph 
of Albany, New York. No children have been born to them. 

Dr. Crothers has few fraternal ties but is a thirty-second degree 
Mason. In creed he is a Congregationalist. In politics he is a 
Eepublican. 




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£4sC^cs/L*^lA >J^^t^6— 



NICHOLAS STAUB. 

STAUB, NICHOLAS, late public man and merchant of New 
Milford, Connecticut, one of the most extensive growers of 
fancy tobacco in the state and one of our most prominent and 
popular members of Legislature, was born in Lorraine, Germany, 
February 1st, 1841, and died in New Milford on January 5th, 1907. 
He will long be honored as one of Connecticut's leading Democrats, 
as a right minded, useful and noble citizen and as a genial, honest 
and capable man. 

As he was left an orphan when he was twelve years old, Nicholas 
Staub was thrown upon his own resources in early youth. He was 
filled with the ambition to seek his fortune in America and at fifteen 
he hired out to a grain dealer in Lorraine for a year, the remuneration 
for his hard and constant labor being $18.00, a pair of boots and 
the incentive hope of earning his passage to the United States. His 
duties began at one in the morning when he began loading up grain 
to send to market. The long hours and hard labor involved in his 
early bread winning made him in his mature life ever the friend of 
young men struggling to rise in the world. 

After a year or so young Nicholas was able to cross over to this 
country and he did so, arriving in New York on Christmas Eve, 1857. 
He remained in the city working at various employments until 1860, 
when he settled in Bridgewater, Connecticut, where he engaged in 
business for thirteen years. During that time he served as selectman 
of Bridgewater and was otherwise identified with business and public 
interests in that place. 

In 1873 Mr. Staub settled in New Milford, which was his home 
and the center of his business and political interests up to the time 
of his death. For many years he was engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness in the partnership known as Soule & Staub, which was subse- 
quently passed over to his son, Verton Staub, who recently sold out 
to his partner, M. H. Mallett. Much of Mr. Staub's time was given 
to growing fancy grades of tobacco in his immense fields on Fort Hill 

125 



126 



NICHOLAS STAUB. 



and his crop of broad leaf was one of the finest ever raised in New 
England. 

In the industrial growth of New Milford, Mr. Staub took a keen 
and effective interest. Foreseeing the rare possibilities in utilizing 
the water power to be afforded by the Housatonie Kiver, he had the 
persistence and courage to start an undertaking that made his own 
fortune and has been of untold benefit to the state. As a result of 
this foresight and able management the New Milford Power Company 
was organized. It received its charter in 1893 and proved a great 
success. It was managed by Mr. Staub until he sold out in 1901. 
He also was instrumental in developing water power industries in 
neighboring localities. 

In politics and all public activities Mr. Staub was as prominent 
and zealous as in industrial and business life. He was state repre- 
sentative in 1876, 1884, 1885, and 1903, and state senator in 1886 
and 1888. During these periods in the Legislature he served on the 
following committees: insurance, new counties, county seats, rail- 
roads, manual and roll, banks, and congressional and senatorial dis- 
tricts. Of several of these committees he was chairman. From 1891 
to 1895 he was state comptroller, being the only Democrat elected on 
the state ticket. His services to the state in six sessions of the Legis- 
lature were valuable and creditable to a high degree and one notable 
feature of his service was that he was never absent a single session 
day. His conduct during the memorable deadlock of that period was 
most intelligent and honorable. 

Mr. Staub's death occurred on January 5th, 1907, and was caused 
by Bright's disease. He is survived by a wife, Nancy Peck Staub, 
whom he married on November 29th, 1866, and three sons, Verton 
Peck Staub, Dr. George Edwards Staub of New Milford and Dr. John 
Howard Staub of Stamford. 

As an industrial leader, a clean and strong politician, a philan- 
thropist, a sociable and kindly citizen and an honorable, big-hearted 
and genial man, Mr. Staub is greatly missed in the town of New 
Milford and in far wider circles. His place is also hard to fill in the 
Congregational Church, of which he was a zealous member and a 
generous supporter. 



BENJAMIN FLETCHER. 

FLETCHER, THE HONORABLE BENJAMIN, Jb., was born 
at Westmore, Vermont, June 4th, 1837. He is a son of Ben- 
jamin and Lucinda (Davis) Fletcher and a descendant, in 
the ninth generation, of Robert Fletcher, who settled at Concord, 
Massachusetts, in 1630. On the maternal side he is a descendant 
of Samuel Davis of Acworth. 

Mr. Fletcher obtained a common school education and beyond 
that he is a self-made man. He is a man of wide and varied in- 
formation and thoroughly conversant with all the details of the 
business to which he devoted his energies from his youth. 

In 1842 Mr. Fletcher went to Nashua, New Hampshire, with 
his parents. He was employed at the works of the Nashua Iron and 
Steel Company for many years as forge-master, and in 1883 removed 
to Bridgeport, Connecticut, to take charge of the affairs of the Bridge- 
port Forge Company, of which he was treasurer and general manager 
until 1904. Since 1904 he has been engaged in the lumber business, 
being president of the Park City Lumber Company. He was elected 
president of the City Savings Bank in July, 1906. 

In his line of industrial pursuits there was probably no man in 
the state who stood higher than Mr. Fletcher when he was at the 
height of his business career. He knew all the technicalities of 
manufacturing, the demands of the markets, and the intricacies of 
business, as shown by his successful career. 

While a resident of Nashua he was much in public life and a 
progressive citizen who wielded a wide influence and performed all 
the public duties he assumed in a manner creditable to himself and 
to the welfare of the city. He was a member of the common council 
in 1868 and 1869, and president of the body in the year last men- 
tioned. In the year 1869 he was elected chief engineer of the fire 
department, and held that responsible position several years between 
that time and 1880, being one of the very best fire fighters Nashua 
ever had. 

128 



130 



BENJAMIN FLETCHER. 



He was elected mayor of the city for 1880 and again for 1881, 
and during his term of office he greatly improved the hydrant system 
for fire department purposes and inaugurated and completed other 
improvements that have proved of lasting benefit to the people. Be- 
sides this service he was an efficient member of the board of ducation 
and active in other affairs calculated to advance the interests of the 
city. 

Mr. Fletcher was made a Mason in Eising Sun Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., and was a charter member of Ancient York Lodge, in which 
he sat in the south while it was under a dispensation in 1870 and of 
which he was treasurer for several years commencing in 1873. He 
received his demit in 1885 and became a member of St. John's Lodge 
at Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he has since become a member of 
Jerusalem Koyal Arch Chapter, Jerusalem Council of Masters, and 
Hamilton Commandery, K. T. 

In Odd Fellowship he has received all the degrees and is a mem- 
ber of Pennichuck Lodge and Indian Head Encampment, withdraw- 
ing from Nashoonon Encampment to become a charter member, and 
is past grand and past patriarch of these bodies, and past grand, past 
high priest and past grand patriarch of the state bodies. He has 
been a member of the grand lodge of New Hampshire over forty years 
and represented it in the sovereign grand lodge in 1871 and 1872. 
He is a member of the Seaside and Algonquin clubs of Bridgeport. 

In religious matters he is a member of the First Universalist 
Church. Mr. Fletcher is a man of ideas, and in the lodge or before 
the public is never at a loss to clothe these ideas so as to make their 
significance plain and forcible. In fact, he is a self-made, self-reliant 
man whose career shows what may be accomplished by study and 
application. 

Mr. Fletcher was united in marriage in 1859 with Pamela 
IngTam, daughter of Boswell and Laura (Pratt) Ingram of Nashua, 
and a descendant of Samuel Ingram and Eichard Pratt. There were 
four children of their marriage, all born in Nashua : Frank M., born 
December 24th, 1859, graduated at Nashua High School, class of 
1881, died January 25th, 1885; Laura Belle, born April 29th, 1864; 
Agnes, born December 4th, 1870, died April, 1874; Eosalind, born 
December 4th, 1870, married O. C. Cole of Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
October 30, 1890. 



IRA HOBART SPENCER. 

SPENCEE, IEA HOBABT, manufacturer and inventor, presi- 
dent of the Spencer Turbine Cleaner Company and vice- 
president of the Organ Power Company of Hartford, was born 
in Barkhamsted, Connecticut, on June 19th, 1873. He is descended 
from Jared Spencer, son of Sir Thomas Spencer of England, who was 
the first settler of Haddam, Connecticut, in 1688, and whose son was 
the distinguished General Joseph Spencer. He has two brothers, the 
Eev. W. H. Spencer and H. D. Spencer. 

Uriel Spencer, Ira H. Spencer's father, was an architect and 
builder, but he was out of health the latter part of his life, and there- 
fore retired from all business activities. Harriet A. Spencer, the 
mother, was a former school teacher. From her Ira H. Spencer re- 
ceived his early education and from both father and mother the best of 
moral and spiritual influences. He studied under maternal guidance 
until he was twelve years of age and then attended school in Winsted 
for two terms, walking four and a half miles night and morning to do 
so. At the age of thirteen he moved to Hartford, which city has 
ever since been his home. Upon settling in Hartford young Ira 
Spencer obtained employment as janitor of St. James Protestant 
Episcopal Church and so arranged his duties that he was able to 
attend the Washington Street School. The next six years were busy 
ones, for he continued to act as church janitor, kept up his studies 
and worked at various other tasks. He also spent one year as a clerk 
in Alonzo White's stationery store. While he was janitor of St. James 
Church he invented and built a motor to save blowing the organ and 
this ingenious makeshift was the nucleus of the present organ blowing 
industry. 

The next work which Ira Spencer undertook was in the employ 
of E. H. Betts, wholesale dealer in salt, salt fish and grocery supplies. 
The honest business methods and sound conservative judgment of this 
helpful employer had a strong and lasting influence upon Mr. Spencer. 
In 1894 Mr. Betts and Mr. E. S. Kibbe, together with Mr. W. E. 

133 



134 



IRA HOBAET SPENCER. 



Gates and Mr. Turner of Glastonbury, helped Mr. Spencer to organize 
the Spencer Motor Company, of which he became president. Later 
the concern was bought out by the L. B. Rhodes Company and event- 
ually became the Organ Power Company, of which Mr. Spencer is 
one of the chief owners and of which he has been vice-president since 
1895. The business of the Organ Power Company has developed so 
rapidly and completely that the concern has practically a monopoly 
in this line. 

Early in 1904 Mr. Spencer became interested in vacuum cleaning 
and conducted experiments resulting in an application for the first 
patent on such a device in 1906. Mr. Spencer now has forty-two 
patents and applications pending on vacuum cleaning apparatus and 
other patents to the number of twenty. The growth of the vacuum 
cleaning industry was so speedy and so great as to make it impossible 
for the Organ Power Company to handle it and in 1907 the Spencer 
Turbine Cleaner Company was organized with Mr. Spencer as presi- 
dent. His was the first turbine cleaner in the world and its superi- 
ority over other vacuum cleaners was fully recognized. Hundreds 
of buildings are now equipped with this apparatus, including the 
State Capitol at Hartford, the Touraine Hotel in Boston, the New 
Fifth Avenue Building in New York and many other large and well- 
equipped buildings. 

Mr. Spencer resides at 447 Prospect Avenue, Hartford. His 
family consists of a wife, Catherine Monks Spencer, whom he married 
September 27th, 1900, and one child, Dorothy Spencer. 



FRANCIS PATRICK GUILFOILE. 

GUILFOILE, FBANCIS PATKICK, MA., LL.D., lawyer and 
former member of Legislature, of Waterbury, New Haven 
County, Connecticut, is the son of Michael and Katherine 
(Lawlor) Guilfoile and was born in Waterbury, February 4th, 1875. 
Both of his parents were natives of Mountrath, Queens County, Ire- 
land, and came to the United States early in life. The father, Michael 
Guilfoile, has been prominent in business life in Waterbury for half 
a century. 

"The boyhood of Francis P. Guilfoile was spent in one of the 
(then) rural sections of Waterbury, known as West Side Hill. He 
received a common school education in the public schools of Water- 
bury. When he was about sixteen years old, he entered Mount Saint 
Mary's College at Emmitsburg, Maryland, and was graduated in 
1895 with the degree of B.A. Later he received the degree of M.A. 
and LL.D. from the same institution. Immediately after completing 
his academic course he took a course in law and literature at the 
Catholic University of America at Washington, D. C, where he 
was graduated in 1898 with the degree of LL.B. The following year 
he was admitted to the bar and began the practice of law in Water- 
bury in the office of Judge George H. Cowell of the district court. 
He has been associated with Judge Cowell in his professional practice 
ever since that time and has been successful as a lawyer. 

A staunch Democrat in his political convictions, Francis Guilfoile 
is a prominent figure in local and state politics. In 1901 he repre- 
sented Waterbury in the House of Eepresentatives and in 1902 he was 
a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. 

Mr. Guilfoile is affiliated with many fraternal, social and chari- 
table organizations and has frequently held office in such bodies. He 
is a thorough scholar and is especially interested in literature. In 
1907 he was elected to the board of agents of the Bronson Library. 
He is fond of outdoor life and sports and takes keen delight in an 
energetic tramp 'cross country. 

On June 30th, 1908, Mr. Guilfoile married Margaret M. 
McDonald, daughter of the late Dr. Edward W. McDonald. 

137 



EDWARD JAMES MANNING. 

MANNING, EDWARD JAMES, General Manager and Super- 
intendent of the Royal Typewriter Company, of Hartford, 
well known throughout the typewriter industry, is an 
example of a successful business man, who began his career from the 
bottom of the ladder, and has steadily kept climbing. He was born 
in New York City on November 12th, 1865. His parents were natives 
of Ireland who emigrated to the United States about 1848. His 
father was an iron moulder by trade, a competent, diligent, and 
reliable workman, and a man of strict integrity. His mother was an 
unselfish, devout Christian woman, whose cheerful disposition and in- 
fluence was always uplifting. The family consisted of four other 
children besides Edward James Manning, and though in humble cir- 
cumstances were able to live in a comfortable manner, owing to the 
careful management and earnest industry on the part of both parents. 

Perhaps it was this constant example of co-operation and thrift 
in family life, that influenced Edward Manning to give up a college 
education and go to work that he might be of some assistance to his 
father, although he had prepared and passed examination in the public 
schools of New York to enter the College of the City of New York, 
when he was but little over fourteen years of age. 

In 1880, when hardly fifteen years of age, he followed his 
natural bent towards the " machinist's trade," and became an appren- 
tice in New York, starting at three dollars per week, learning to design 
and construct machinery and tools used in the manufacture of watches 
and jewelry. This apprenticeship lasted nearly four years, and dur- 
ing that time he attended the evening high schools of New York, 
where he sUidied mechanical draughting, mathematics and bookkeep- 
ing. He also read broadly, not only along technical lines but history 
and romance. 

In 1884, after a few months further experience at his trade in 
various machine shops, he became a mechanic in the employ of the 
Garvin Machine Company, of New York, who were then manu- 

138 




r-,, :-.. £ r- ■■■:■■■..-._ j 4 ■- .■ y 




• EDWAKD JAMES MANNING. 141 

facturing the Hammond typewriter, and in two years' time he was 
advanced to the position of Chief Inspector of that department of the 
Garvin Company's business. 

In 1886, Mr. Manning became directly engaged with the 
Hammond Typewriter Company, of New York, whose business was 
growing rapidly, and remained with them seven years, or until 1893, 
steadily advancing on until finally he became their mechanical expert 
and a member of their advisory board, being consulted on all the com- 
pany's projects. During this time he learned to operate the Hammond 
typewriter so expertly that for two years (1889 to 1891) he was 
acknowledged to be the most rapid typewriter operator in the world, 
and traveled for the Hammond Company throughout the United 
States, Canada, and parts of Europe, giving exhibitions of rapid 
writing in all of the principal cities of these countries, and meeting 
all contestants. He was never defeated in any contest. While travel- 
ing he also acted in the capacity of general sales agent, and mechanical 
expert for the company. 

Mr. Manning was one of the organizers (in 1893), secretary, and 
finally president of, the Typewriter Inspection Company, of New 
York, which company has enjoyed a most successful business career. 

In 1896, the first Underwood Visible Typewriter was placed on 
the market, Mr. Manning having been associated with the inventor 
since the first model of the machine was built, in 1895. He was 
engaged as factory manager and expert by the Underwood Company 
in 1896, which position he held for eleven years or until 1907. He 
was prominently associated with the Underwood Company's won- 
derful development in every way throughout this period, starting the 
manufacture of their products with less than a dozen workmen in 
1896. They employed upwards of 1800 factory operatives at the time 
he resigned in 1907. 

In April, 1907, he engaged with the Eoyal Typewriter Company 
as General Manager and Superintendent of their factories, which 
position he occupies at the present time, 1909. 

From time to time he has taken out patents on various devices 
and improvements which he has invented in connection with type- 
writing machines, all of which have been of considerable value in the 
progress of the industry in which he is such a strong factor. 

Mr. Manning is an independent in politics, is a member of the 
6 



142 



EDWARD JAMES MANNING. 



Hartford Club, the Country Club of Hartford, Hartford Board of 
Trade, Hartford Business Men's Association, and Hartford Manu- 
facturers' Association. For diversion he enjoys music, automobiling, 
fishing, and all forms of athletic sports. His family consists of a 
wife and five children, and his home life is ideal. Mrs. Manning's 
maiden name was Jennie Millicent Koberts, daughter of Richard 
Ward and Eliza Jane Eoberts, of New York City, when he married 
her January 1, 1882. The children are Edward James, Jr., Howard 
Roberts, Horace Teele, Lester Ward, and Helen Gladys Manning. 
Their home is in Hartford. 

Mr. Manning has a strong personal magnetism, his person- 
ality being one that creates a favorable and lasting impression on those 
with whom he comes in contact, whether in a business or social way. 
He has a natural gift for organization, and exceptional judgment in 
selecting both capable and loyal assistants, coupled with the faculty 
of bringing out the best that is in them. He is a firm believer in the 
power of early influences, in properly laying the foundations of char- 
acter and success, and values highly his early lessons as to the value 
of money and its careful expenditure, and the necessity of forming 
industrious habits while young. He considers work and a determina- 
tion to constantly improve in one's work, to be the solution of the 
problem of success, and that the first step towards that goal is the 
performance of specific duties in early life. He adds : 

" Try to discover from your natural inclinations what you are 
best suited for, or what you would like to be. Always work diligently, 
expect many disappointments, but never lose confidence in your ability 
to accomplish what you undertake; cultivate patience, and be abso- 
lutely honest in all your dealings. Every man is at his best only when 
he believes in himself." 

" The qualities which I believe have helped me most in attain- 
ing such success as I have had are concentration, the determination to 
finish whatever I start, the development of a considerable amount of 
patience, a willingness and capacity for hard work at all times, a 
cheerful disposition, a consideration for my fellowman, and a desire 
to be fair in all my dealings." 



LYMAN SHELDON CATLIN. 

CATLIN, LYMAN SHELDON, treasurer of the Mechanics and 
Fanners Savings Bank of Bridgeport, veteran officer of the 
Civil War and a public man who has held many political 
offices, was born in Harwinton, Litchfield County, Connecticut, on 
January 21st, 1840. His ancestry is of unusual distinction as it 
dates back to the time of the Norman Conquest when the Catlins 
were property owners in Newington, Bochelan, County Kent, England. 
The Doomsday Book records E. de Catlin as a follower of William 
the Conqueror and Sir Robert Catlin as one who was knighted for 
gallant service under the Black Prince in the Battle of Agincourt. 
Thomas Catlin came to Hartford in 1632 and held many town offices. 
Lyman Sheldon Catlin is in the seventh generation of descent from 
Thomas. On the maternal side Mr. Catlin is descended from Samuel 
Hine, a Revolutionary soldier. Isaac Catlin, another distinguished 
ancestor, participated in the French and Indian Wars and in the 
Revolution. 

Sheldon Catlin, Mr. Catlin's father, was a stone worker and 
farmer. He died when his son was still in infancy. The mother, 
Cornelia Baldwin, was a woman of strong character, whose influence 
was in all respects noble and lasting. The boy attended the district 
school of Harwinton and in this " little red school-house " came 
under the influence of a teacher who was a remarkably superior woman 
and who gave him a desire for a higher education. He went to the 
village academy for a few months, studying under the late Hon. 
William C. Case. He commenced "working out" for a farmer at 
the age of ten and from that time on worked at farming and as 
clerk in the country store during all but the mid-winter months. He 
was fond of reading and as books were hard to obtain he learned to 
know a few good books thoroughly and memorized many of the works 
of Longfellow and Whittier. Fiction was even more rare but " Uncle 
Tom's Cabin " was accessible and influential. At an early age he 
took up school teaching with the idea of educating himself while 

145 



146 LTMAN SHELDON CATLIN. 

" earning a living." In 1862 the opening of the Civil War changed 
his plans, for he immediately enlisted, entering, as a private, 
Company A, 19th Kegiment, Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He 
remained in that regiment for two years, at the end of which he was 
commissioned first lieutenant in the 13th Kegiment United States 
Artillery (colored). He was then a participant in the engagement 
on the Cumberland Eiver in southwestern Kentucky and was cap- 
tured by General Forrest's cavalry, imprisoned and sentenced to be 
hanged with the other surviving officers of colored troop. They 
escaped by means of a gunboat. In 1865 this command was mustered 
out and Lieutenant Catlin was commissioned as first lieutenant in the 
5th Kegiment United States Cavalry (colored), and served in 
Arkansas until 1866, when he was mustered out and returned to 
Connecticut after four years of highly creditable military service. 

After the War Mr. Catlin located in Bridgeport, where he has 
lived ever since with the exception of the time between 1870 and 1873 
when he was in Alabama and Kansas in the employ of a Chicago 
insurance company. Those were the days when the " Ku Klux Klan " 
was active in Alabama and Mr. Catlin had many adventures and some 
narrow escapes. Later the company transferred him to Kansas, where 
he worked for their interests until 1873. 

Soon after his return to Bridgeport Mr. Catlin organized the 
Mechanics' and Farmers' Savings Bank of that city. His business 
ability and capable financeering have been largely responsible for the 
growth, success and high standing of that institution, of which he 
has been the chief executive officer from its organization. 

For many years Mr. Catlin was a strong Republican in his 
political allegiance but for some years past he has been an inde- 
pendent voter. In 1881 and 1883 he represented the town of 
Stratford in the General Assembly. He served on the joint com- 
mittee on school funds in 1881 and was house chairman of the com- 
mittee on banks in 1883. In 1888 he was elected Senator from the 
Thirteenth District and in the session of 1889 was chairman of the 
joint committee on banks. In the same year he was appointed by 
the Governor chairman of the committee on " further accommodation 
for the insane." After a thorough canvass of the state he made 
valuable reports for the use of the General Assembly of 1891 and 1893. 

Mr. Catlin is a member of the Elias Howe, Jr., Post No. 3, 



LYMAN SHELDON CATLIN. 147 

G. A. K., of the New York Commandery of Military Order of the 
Loyal Legion and of the Ex-Prisoners of War Association. He enjoys 
out-door life and deems golf the best recreation. He married Helen J. 
Lewis of Stratford September 28th, 1871. His four children are 
Sheldon, a Yale graduate, 1894; Lucy J., now Mrs. Egbert Marsh; 
George L., a Yale graduate, 1901, and Cornelia, wife of Lieutenant 
Julius A. Furer, United States Navy. Mrs. Catlin died in October, 
1906. 

Belief and experience influence Mr. Catlin to give the following 
advice to young people seeking success in their life work: "Make 
the most of the opportunities you have and greater ones will surely 



JAY ELLERY SPAULDING. 

SPAULDING, JAY ELLERY, treasurer and general manager 
of the New England Pin Company of Winsted, president of 
the New England Knitting Company, president of the Morgan 
Silver Plate Company and also of the Carter, Hakes Machine Com- 
pany, was born near Gloversville, New York, on August 15th, 1846, 
the son of Lockwood and Mary A. (Spaulding) Spaulding. His 
father was a farmer who held the office of justice of peace and was 
a deacon in his church as well as Sunday school superintendent. He 
exerted a strong influence for good upon his son's life and brought 
him up in the thrifty farmer's way, keeping him on the home farm 
until he was eighteen. The boy's education was acquired in the 
common schools and at a private school. 

At the age of twenty Jay Ellery Spaulding became a clerk in 
J. J. Whiting's hardware store in Winsted and he continued at this 
work for two years. He then spent a year in the employ of Timothy 
Hulbert, an iron manufacturer, whom he left to enter into partner- 
ship with J. J. Whiting and S. F. Dickerman. In 1871 he went to 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, and was employed for two years in the Old 
National Bank, the largest in the state outside of Detroit. 

Upon his return to Winsted in 1873 Mr. Spaulding opened his 
long connection with the New England Pin Company by first becom- 
ing general office man and soon afterwards secretary. Since 1887 
he has been treasurer and general manager of this well-known manu- 
facturing industry and he has been the chief factor in its rapid and 
progressive upbuilding during the long period of his connection with 
that concern. There is nothing left now of the original plant, so 
complete and thorough has been his work, and it is now a large concern 
with modern factories turning out gigantic quantities of excellent, 
up-to-date products to be shipped all over the land as a result of his 
thirty-six years of devotion to the business. 

Besides being president of the New England Knitting Company, 
of the Morgan Silver Plate Company, makers of casket hardware, 

148 



4tli**" 




-":•' -•■ -~ - ' '■,-■: JJS„ 




JAY ELLBRT SPAULDING. 



151 



and of the Carter, Hakes Machine Company, Mr. Spaulding is a 
director in the Citizen Printing Company and in the Dowd Printing 
Company, commercial printers. He is manager of the Winsted Opera 
House and agent of the estate of J. G. Wetmore. He is regarded as 
one of Winsted's most able and successful business men. 

A loyal Eepublican, Mr. Spaulding has always been active in 
local politics. He served as burgess and warden for ten years, was 
a member of the Legislature in 1895, town treasurer for fourteen 
years, and he has been a zealous member of many local civic com- 
mittees. During his term as representative he served on the committee 
on incorporations and as clerk of the Litchfield County representa- 
tives. He is a member of the Eepublic Town Committee. 

Mr. Spaulding is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and a member 
of the Order of Elks. He has been active in fire organizations of both 
town and state. 

In 1872 Mr. Spaulding married Elizabeth E. Wetmore, who died 
in 1890. Of the two children of this marriage but one survives, 
Louise W., now the wife of Attorney James W. Husted, of Peekskill, 
New York. The other, a son, John W., was born in 1878 and died 
in 1895. 

Mr. Spaulding's second marriage occurred on June 30th, 1892. 
The present Mrs. Spaulding's maiden name was Grace W. Hopkins. 
No children have been born of this marriage. 



HARMON GEORGE HOWE. 

HOWE, HARMON GEORGE, M.D., physician and surgeon of 
Hartford, ex-president of the Hartford Hospital Board and 
one of the most prominent men in the medical profession in 
his city and state, is a native of Vermont, though his entire mature 
and professional life has been spent in Hartford. He was born in 
the village of Jericho, Chittenden County, Vermont, on September 3d, 
1850. His father, Lucien B. Howe, a merchant and manufacturer, 
was of old New England lineage, and was prominent in his com- 
munity, being representative, town treasurer and the incumbent of 
other local offices. Dr. Howe's mother, Clarissa J. Galusha Howe, 
was a descendant of several of Vermont's early governors, including 
Thomas Chittenden, Jonas Galusha and Martin Chittenden. The 
Chittendens settled in Connecticut in the early part of the seventeenth 
century and in 1639 William Chittenden, father of Governor Chit- 
tenden, founded the town of Guilford, Connecticut, which he pur- 
chased from the Indians. 

Brought up under the influence of a noble mother and an indus- 
trious father, Harmon G. Howe formed habits of careful, conscien- 
tious industry in early boyhood. He had the care of the garden and 
stable and of feeding and tending the live stock. With the exception 
of one winter spent in Canada and another in school in Ohio, his 
entire youth was spent in Vermont. He prepared for college at Essex 
Classical Institute and at TJnderhill Academy and then entered the 
chemical laboratory of the University of Vermont. After a course of 
several months in chemistry he entered the Medical School of the 
University of Vermont, where he was graduated with the medical 
degree and high honors in 1873. 

Immediately after his graduation from medical school, Dr. Howe 
received an appointment to the Hartford Hospital. Early in 1874 
he was appointed assistant to Dr. Barston, the head of Sanford Hall, 
Flushing, Long Island. He remained in Flushing a year and then 
took a post-graduate course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of New York City, where he was graduated in 1875 with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. The year following he served as assistant at 

152 



HARMON GEOEGE HOWE. 155 

the Ketreat for the Insane at Hartford, resigning in 1876 to settle in 
Hartford in the general practice of medicine and surgery. 

Dr. Howe has practiced medicine and surgery in Hartford with 
distinguished success ever since 1876. Soon after he opened his prac- 
tice he received an appointment on the Hartford Dispensary staff 
and since 1878 he has been a member of the visiting staff of the Hart- 
ford Hospital. He is also a director of the hospital, and was chairman 
of its executive committee and president of the institution. He is one 
of the visiting physicians of the Eetreat for the Insane and medical 
referee of a number of the leading insurance companies in the state. 
He is a member of city, state, county and national medical associations 
and has been president of the city society. He has written several 
valuable papers for some of these societies and is considered an 
authority on all matters pertaining to surgery, which has been his 
special interest and work for the past twenty years. As a consulting 
surgeon he is much in demand all over the state. 

Besides the various medical societies already mentioned, Dr. 
Howe is a member of many clubs and organizations, including the 
Hartford Club, the Country Club of Farmington, the Connecticut 
Historical Society, the Automobile Club of Hartford, and the Eepub- 
lican Club of Hartford. He is a member of the Fourth Congrega- 
tional Church. He enjoys and advocates all forms of out-of-door 
recreation and takes the greatest pleasure in fishing, boating and 
automobiling. He has been a member of St. Bernard's Fishing and 
Hunting Club of Quebec. For eleven years Dr. Howe served as 
medical officer of the First Kegiment, Connecticut National Guard, 
becoming assistant surgeon with rank of major and later surgeon 
of the First Company, Governor's Foot Guard, which office he still 
holds. 

On April 12th, 1876, Dr. Howe married Harriet M. Stevens, 
daughter of Luther M. and Mary Ann Catlin Stevens of Jericho, 
Vermont. Three children have been born of this marriage, two of 
whom are now living: Horace S. and Frances B. Howe Muchlow. 

Dr. Howe logically puts success on a foundation of physical 
soundness. He says, " A sound body is a fine foundation for a sound 
mind and the modern method of training the body as well as the 
mind should be advocated and followed by all of us." 

The doctor's city home is on High Street, Hartford, and his 
summer home is " Windhart," at Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire. 



ALBERT MILLS WOOSTER. 

WOOSTEK, ALBEKT MILLS, patent lawyer and solicitor, 
lecturer and writer, is regarded as one of the chief patent 
authorities in the state, as well as one of the leading lawyers 
and citizens of Bridgeport. He was horn in Chatham, Columbia 
County, New York, April 15th, 1850, the son of William Cogswell 
and Mary Louise Gilbert Wooster. In 1857 the family removed to 
New Preston, Connecticut. Mr. Wooster's father was a merchant, 
postmaster and Sunday school superintendent at the time of his death 
in 1864. Through him Mr. Wooster is descended from Edward 
Wooster, who settled in Milford in 1625, coming from England, as 
did all of Mr. Wooster's ancestors, including Gov. Eobert Treat, gov- 
ernor of the Province of Connecticut from 1683 to 1698, and John 
Beard, an early settler in this state. Mr. Wooster's four great-grand- 
fathers, Ephraim Wooster, Capt. Stephen Cogswell, Thomas Gilbert, 
and Joel Beard, and his great-great-grandfather, Sergeant Samuel 
Beard, each carried a musket or sword in the Bevolution, and his 
grandfathers, Philo Mills Wooster and Lucius Gilbert, fought in the 
War of 1812. 

Albert Wooster began to earn his living at an early age. This, 
was especially necessary as he had three younger brothers and a 
mother to look out for. From his mother he received strong and 
lasting inspiration and influence, particularly on his intellectual and 
moral life. He attended the local district school, also Gould Whittle- 
sey's School and Upson Seminary in New Preston, Connecticut, and 
Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie. 

Between the ages of fifteen and eighteen, Albert Wooster worked 
on a farm and as clerk in a country store. At eighteen he became a 
clerk in the dry-goods store of A. T. Stewart and Company in New 
York and remained thus employed for three years. The next few 
years he worked as a dry-goods clerk and sewing machine agent for 
several firms. His goal was the profession of law and he was working 
to gain the means of educating himself for that career. With this 

156 



ALBERT MILLS WOOSTER. 



159 



end in view he sought appointment by competitive examination under 
the civil service rules in a government department. In October, 
1874, he was appointed clerk in the Post-Office Department at Wash- 
ington and served in the Dead Letter Office. This enabled him to 
study law in the Law School of the National University, which he 
did, graduating with the degree of LL.B. in 1876. He took a post- 
graduate course at the Columbian University, now George Washington 
University, and received the degree of LL.M. in 1880. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Washington and was admitted as an attorney 
and counsellor of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

In 1875 Mr. Wooster decided to make a special study of patent 
law and secured a transfer from the Post-Office Department to the 
Patent Office, where he was appointed an assistant examiner. As 
this was the beginning of his chosen career he considered it his first 
active work in life. After seven years' experience in the Patent 
Office he resigned in 1882, since when he has practiced law in Bridge- 
port a period of over twenty-five years, during which he has special- 
ized as a patent lawyer with great success. 

Since Mr. Wooster settled in Bridgeport he has been active in 
municipal affairs and in educational and intellectual interests. He 
has been president of the board of councilmen, and alderman, and 
is a member of the board of education. 

Though his calling requires the constant study of technical litera- 
ture, Mr. Wooster is greatly interested in history, biography and 
novels and finds such reading the ideal mental recreation. He has 
made a special study of the life of Napoleon, resulting in an inter- 
esting lecture which has been delivered before several clubs. He 
frequently lectures before the Scientific Society, the Board of Trade, 
and in the Public Library. His best known lectures are " Napoleon," 
"Patents," "Trademarks and Unfair Trade," and "Pictures and 
How They are Made." 

Mr. Wooster is a member of the Contemporary Club, the Univer- 
sity Club, the Bridgeport Yacht Club, and the Alumni Association of 
George Washington University. He is a Congregationalist in creed 
and a Republican in polities. He is a noble of the Mystic Shrine, a 
Knight Templar, and a thirty-third degree Scottish Bite Mason. All 
these professional, literary and social interests have left no time in 
Mr. Wooster's busy life for the cultivation of any hobby or sport, but 



160 



ALBERT MILLS WOOSTER. 



he believes a cold bath and a half hour's exercise necessary every day. 
As his education for the practical duties of life has been acquired 
by constant study since maturity, he has collected a good reference 
library and believes one of the valuable results of studying in mature 
life has come from this and from his habit of never letting new words 
or unfamiliar allusions pass without adding to his sum of knowledge. 
He would advise young Americans to decide upon their profession 
or occupation and then make every effort to perfect themselves in 
their chosen calling. He adds : " Be temperate, allow ample time 
for sleep and reasonable recreation. Obey the Golden Eule in business 
and social life. Deserve and therefore command the respect of all 
associates. Cultivate personal and political morality, do your political 
duty and strive to elevate the tone of civil polity." 

On April 15th, 1875, Mr. Wooster married Fannie Brownley 
Bowen of Warren County, Virginia. Three children were born of 
this marriage, of whom two are now living, Julian Scott Wooster, 
attorney-at-law in New York City, and Myra Estelle Wooster, a 
miniature painter. 

Mr. Wooster's residence is at No. 778 Park Avenue, Bridgeport. 



GEORGE D. WORKMAN. 

WOKKMAN, GEOEGE D., late president of the Warrenton 
Woolen Company of Torrington, the Torrington Electric 
Light Company, the Torrington National Bank, and the 
Workman-Eawlinson Company, furniture dealers of Torrington, was 
born in Gloucester, England, on July 23d, 1835. His grandfather, 
James Workman, came to Torrington in his latter days. Samuel 
Workman, George D. Workman's father, came to America with his 
family when his son George was but a year old and located in 
New York, where he was employed as a wool-grader. A year later he 
came to Torrington, where he did similar work. In 1859 he bought 
an interest in the Union Manufacturing Company of Torrington and 
continued to buy its stock until he became, in 1873, the largest stock- 
holder in the concern. He continued as wool buyer for the company 
until 1861. He died in 1879. His wife was Caroline Franklin, like 
himself a native of Gloucester, England, where their marriage was 
solemnized and their son George was born. 

The Torrington public schools furnished George D. Workman's 
early education. He remained at home throughout his boyhood and 
early manhood, and when his parents began to yield to the infirmities 
of old age he devoted himself to their succor and support and assumed 
the ownership and management of the family homestead, where he 
still resides. As soon as he left school he entered the woolen mill 
and under his father's guidance thoroughly mastered the practical 
details of the woolen industry. 

In 1861 he took his father's place as wool buyer for the Union 
Company. In 1865 he began buying shares of stock in the company 
and in 1883 he became the largest stockholder. In 1873 he entered 
the office as agent and treasurer and rose so rapidly to positions of 
increased responsibility and honor that in 1883 he was elected 
president of the company. While a woolen mill has existed on the 
present site since 1820, the present company, originally styled the 
Union Manufacturing Company, was not organized until 1845. 

163 



164 GEORGE D. WORKMAN. 

Formerly exclusive makers of an excellent quality of broad cloth, the 
company has long been known for the fine grade of its goods. In 
1894 the name was changed to the present one, the Warrenton Woolen 
Company. The concern is engaged in the extensive manufacture of 
superior woolen materials especially designed for uniforms such as 
those worn by the policemen and military bodies. Under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Workman as president with his brother, John, as treasurer 
and his nephew, Samuel C, as secretary, the company carried on an 
extensive business, employing over one hundred hands and comprising 
one of the chief industries of the thriving manufacturing town of 
Torrington. In the summer of 1907 the business had so obviously 
outgrown its plant that a new site was purchased in the northern part 
of the town. The new plant has double the capacity of the old one 
and is most modern in construction, being equipped with electrical 
drive throughout and fitted with the most advanced labor-saving 
devices. The progress that necessitated the new plant and the chief 
plans for its construction and advancement were alike due to Mr. 
Workman's sagacity, enterprise and integrity. 

Both in and out of business life Mr. Workman was known and 
respected for his keen intellect, his splendid powers of organization 
and his strength of character. He was a power for good in the com- 
munity and a sincere member and worker in the Episcopal Church 
of which his father was one of the parish organizers. He passed 
away June 7th, 1908. 





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FRANK ASHLEY WILMOT. 

WILMOT, FBANK ASHLEY, president and treasurer of The 
American Tube and Stamping Company of Bridgeport, and 
one of the foremost manufacturers of that city of many 
industries, was born in Brooklyn, New York, February 21st, 1865. 
His parents, Samuel Eussell and Sarah M. Guernsey Wilmot, were 
God-fearing, Christian people who brought him up to be strict in 
his moral standards and industrious as a worker. His father was a 
manufacturer and mechanical engineer whose life was too devoted to 
business to admit of the acceptance of various public honors offered 
to him. Through him Mr. Wilmot is descended from Doctor Bobert 
Wilmot who came from England to this country in 1837. On his 
mother's side Mr. Wilmot is descended from the family of Guernsey 
or Garnsey which settled in this country in 1680, when one of its 
members came from England and settled in Milford, Connecticut. 

During his early infancy Frank A. Wilmot's family moved from' 
Brooklyn to Bridgeport, Connecticut, and that city has been his home 
ever since that time. The summers of his boyhood were spent in 
Watertown, Connecticut, part of which is known as Guernseytown, 
named for his mother's father, Ebenezer Guernsey. A common 
school education with some private tuition was all that fell to 
Frank A. Wilmot's lot in childhood and early manhood but he was an 
intelligent and earnest reader, especially of books devoted to mechanical 
engineering, metallurgy and finance; such reading he has continued 
to enjoy and use as technical training in his mature life. 

At the age of fifteen Frank Wilmot began business life by 
working in the summer time as a cashier. Two years later he gave 
up further schooling and entered his father's business, then known 
as The Wilmot and Hobbs Manufacturing Company, with which he 
has ever since been identified. He began at the lowest round of the 
ladder, working at the humblest mechanical work in the factory and 
in the office. The concern then employed about fifty hands but was 
struggling into prominence and power. Frank Wilmot worked up 

167 



168 FRANK ASHLEY WILMOT. 

through all the grades of factory and office work, growing with the 
company and helping the company to grow with all his might and 
main. During the years just preceding and following his coming of 
age he was a traveling representative of the company. He was soon 
afterward made secretary and in 1894 became treasurer and vice- 
president of the company. Since the death of his father, in 1897, 
he has been president and treasurer of the company. Under his 
twelve years' management the company has been greatly enlarged in 
its plant, its capital and its business, and has been changed in style 
to The American Tube and Stamping Company, a concern widely 
known for its many tens of thousands of steel products annually 
marketed all over the East. It now has a capital stock of $2,800,000. 
The twenty-seven years of untiring devotion to the development of 
the industry which Mr. Wilmot has expended are chiefly responsible 
for the growth and improvement of the business. Through his in- 
fluence and purposeful mastering of all necessary details of operating 
the business he brought about the establishment of Connecticut's first 
Basic Open Hearth Steel Ingot-making furnaces and billet mills. 
When the organization of the steel trust made it difficult to secure the 
special quality of steel billets used in his company's finishing rolling 
mills, Mr. Wilmot originated the scheme of making them from scrap 
iron and steel produced in New England which had previously been 
shipped to the steel makers in Pennsylvania. His plan of thus 
supplying his rolling mill plants and others with raw material in the 
form of the best open hearth steel billets, slabs and even ingots 
weighing as high as forty to fifty tons in one piece for large forge 
work proved highly successful, saved his concern from closing because 
of the withholding of its raw materials, and has tended to increase 
the company's output many times. All this achievement and in- 
dustrial development has been accomplished by one head and leader- 
ship, and that of a man still young, as years go. One reason for his 
great success has been his ability to test men, to select the right 
assistants and employees, to place them most effectively, and to work 
with them conscientiously and intelligently. 

Mr. Wilmot has made many important inventions connected with 
his manufacturing interests and has United States and foreign 
patents covering them. Outside of his own absorbing business Mr. 
Wilmot has few business ties. For more than a decade he has been a 



FRANK ASHLEY WILMOT. 169 

director in the City National Bank of Bridgeport. He is a Republican 
of long standing. In creed lie combines the beliefs of the Congrega- 
tionalists and Episcopalians. Though business cares give little 
time for social pleasure or regular out-of-door recreation other than 
yachting and automobiling indulged in moderately, he is a member 
of many fine clubs and an advocate of healthy sports and exercise. 
He has taken the thirty-second degree of the order of Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons and is also a Knight Templar and a Noble of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the Hartford Club, the Trans- 
portation Club of New York, the Brooklawn, Seaside, Algonquin 
and Yacht Clubs of Bridgeport. In spite of all these social affilia- 
tions he spends most of his time free from business at home with his 
family. His wife was Florence Margaret Cartwright when he married 
her in 1888. Five of their six children are now living: Russell 
Cartwright, now pursuing the mechanical engineering course at 
Sheffield Institute, Yale University, Marguerite Florence, Dorothy 
Eardley, Frank A., Jr., and Edwin Guernsey. Their home is at 
633 Clinton Avenue, Bridgeport. 

Frank A. Wilmot advises young men to "be trustworthy and 
studious, choose wisely at the start of your life-work, then stick to it 
and be not easily diverted therefrom. Work hard to make the best 
of conditions and move with the progress of the world." 



LUTHER GUITEAU TURNER. 

TUBNEE, LUTHEB GUITEAU, president and general man- 
ager of the Turner and Seymour Manufacturing Company 
of Torrington, Litchfield County, Connecticut, and a leader 
in banking, social and church life in his town, was born in New 
London, June 8th, 1845. His father was Peter Comstock Turner, 
a banker and one of the most highly respected citizens of New 
London and his mother was Mary Ann Mason Turner, a woman 
who exerted a strong intellectual and moral influence upon her son's 
character and habits. Through her he is descended from Major John 
Mason, who came to America in 1630. Mr. Turner is also descended 
from the historic Elder William Brewster. 

The public and high school life of New London gave Luther 
Turner his elementary and preparatory education. He then took a 
course at Madison (now Colgate) University in Hamilton, New York. 
After leaving college he returned to New London and went to work 
as assistant cashier of the First National Bank. This was in 1864 
and the following year he went South to take the position of receiving 
clerk in the New Orleans Customs House, where he remained for 
one year. 

In 1867 Mr. Turner located in Torrington and became identified 
with the manufacturing concern known as Turner and Company. 
Three years later he went to New York to act as salesman for The 
Turner and Seymour Manufacturing Company, one of the largest 
brass industries in the eastern States. From 1876 to 1879 he was 
secretary of the company and in 1879 he became director as well, 
continuing until 1892 as manager of their New York office. In 1892 
he returned to the home office of the industry in Torrington and was 
made treasurer of the company, with the additional responsibilities 
of general manager. Since 1900 he haa been president and general 
manager. During his long connection with that industry he has 
made many practical inventions, the patents of which have been of 
great value to the company. 

170 







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LUTHEB QUITE AU TURNEB. 173 

Mr. Turner is director of the Torrington Manufacturing Com- 
pany, director of the Brooks National Bank, trustee of the Torrington 
Savings Bank, trustee, director and ex-president of the Y. M. C. A. 
of Torrington. He is a member of many clubs and societies and is 
greatly interested in patriotic organizations. He is a member of the 
Society of Colonial Wars, the Mayflower Society, Sons of American 
Revolution, the Hardware Club of New York, the Torrington Club 
and the college fraternity. Delta Kappa Upsilon. He is a Mason 
in fraternal affiliation, a Republican in politics, and a member of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church. His family consists of a wife, 
whose maiden name was Mary Louise Stearns previous to their mar- 
riage in 1885, and three children, Marjorie Stearns Turner, Alice 
Mason Turner and Mason Turner. 



MARSHALL ELIOT MORRIS. 

MORRIS, MARSHALL ELIOT, manufacturer of Bridgeport, 
Fairfield County, Connecticut, was born in Salem (now 
Naugatuck), New Haven County, Connecticut, May 8th, 
1837. He is a descendant of Thomas Morris, who came to this country 
soon after 1700 and settled on the James River, Virginia, Mr. Morris 
is the son of Sheldon and Betsy Morris. His father was a manu- 
facturer of clocks in Litchfield, Connecticut. Of his mother Mr. 
Morris says : " She was a home-loving, gentle, sweet-tempered 
woman, influencing her children more by example than by precept." 
He adds that the influence of good women has been strongest upon 
his life morally and intellectually. To his early Sunday-school 
teacher, Mrs. Origen Seymour, wife of the late distinguished jurist, 
he owes a beautiful example of a devoted Christian life. 

Marshall Morris attended the Litchfield preparatory schools 
and St. Michael's Episcopal Church and Sunday-school. Until he 
was sixteen years of age he lived in Litchfield and from fourteen to six- 
teen he worked as a clerk for a Litchfield merchant. The family 
having moved from Litchfield to Bridgeport he followed them and 
was engaged in mercantile life until 1858 when he went to Du Quoin, 
in southern Illinois, and was in a mercantile business for eight years, 
a part of this time in partnership with Daniel B. Hatch, a former 
Bridgeport man, who afterward was for many years a well known 
banker in New York. 

After returning to Bridgeport Mr. Morris was engaged in manu- 
facturing with his father, the firm being S. Morris and Company, 
manufacturers of sewing machine furniture. S. Morris and Company 
was reorganized into the Sewing Machine Cabinet Company and Mr. 
Morris was secretary and manager for twenty-five years; his father, 
the president of the company, going to Indianapolis, Indiana, and 
building up a large branch of the business. 

Retiring from manufacturing, Mr. Morris engaged in the 

174 



MARSHALL ELIOT MOREIS. 



177 



development of a new industry cultivating and exporting oysters and 
for fifteen years made a success of the industry. 

Mr. Morris has held the following important positions : secretary 
of the Sewing Machine Cabinet Company, president of the Alligretti 
Refrigerator Company, local vice-president of the American Surety 
Company of New York, first vice-president of the Mechanics and 
Farmers Savings Bank, and director in the Connecticut National Bank 
of Bridgeport. He is a member of the executive committee of the 
Bridgeport Hospital and ex-member of the city board of education. 
In 1902 he was Bepublican candidate for the Legislature. 

Though reared an Episcopalian Mr. Morris is now a member 
and deacon of the First Baptist Church of Bridgeport. He is a 
member of the order of Masons, of the Seaside Club and of the 
Outing Club of Bridgeport. For recreation he enjoys walking, fishing 
and boating. His family numbers a wife and four children. 
Mrs. Morris was Margaret Elizabeth Winters; they were married in 
1862. She was the daughter of Christopher and Margaret Roberts 
Winters. Mrs. Morris' father was a sturdy western pioneer, of great 
strength of character. Her mother was born in Kentucky, of ances- 
tors who came from South Carolina. Mrs. Morris has inherited her 
father's mental qualities and her mother's devotion to her family. 

The first son, Louis Sheldon Morris, oyster planter and builder, 
born in Du Quoin, Illinois, September, 1862, married at the age of 
twenty-one, Miss Jenny Morse, daughter of Dr. Albert H. Mixer, 
professor of modern languages in Rochester University. 

The second son, Paul Winter Morris, sculptor, was born in Du 
Quoin, Illinois, November 12th, 1865, and was married in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, to Miss Elizabeth Craig, daughter of Augustus James 
Craig and Mary Louise Thompson of Bohemia Manor, Cecil County, 
Maryland, and direct descendant through the Craigs of Sir Thomas 
Wyatt. 

Maud Margaret Morris, born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Janu- 
ary 27th, 1873, was married to William Thurston Hincks, a prominent 
broker, graduate of Yale University and also of Yale Law School. 

The youngest daughter, Grace Elizabeth Morris, born in Bridge- 
port, Connecticut, November 18th, 1875, was married to Edgar Webb 
Bassick, a well known manufacturer. 



DAVID ALLEN SYKES. 

SYKES, DAVID ALLEN, general superintendent of the 
Hockanum Mills Company, cloth manufacturers, of Eockville, 
Tolland County, Connecticut, represents a family that has 
been engaged in the woolen business for several generations, carrying 
on that line of manufacturing in England previous to 1851, when 
David Sykes' parents came to this country. They were John and 
Harriet Durrans Sykes, and the father made the woolen industry his 
life work. David A. Sykes was born in Millville, Worcester County, 
Massachusetts, on February 2d, 1858. 

Until he was fifteen years old David Sykes attended the Millville 
Grammar School. He spent most of his vacations at work in the 
woolen mill where his father was employed. When he gave up 
school to go to work he became a weaver in the Millville Manu- • 
facturing Company, and was thus employed for nearly a year when 
he left to go to North Adams and work as a designer in the North 
Adams Manufacturing Company, of which his brother was the 
superintendent. There he worked his way up through all the various 
grades and branches of labor. 

In 1886, Mr. Sykes located in Eockville and became superin- 
tendent of the newly organized Springville Manufacturing Company. 
In 1906, this company together with the Hockanum Company, the 
New England Company and the Minterburn Company, entered into 
the powerful combination known as the Hockanum Mills Company, 
and Mr. Sykes became general superintendent of the new organiza- 
tion. The company is an enormous one, widely renowned for its 
unexcelled worsteds and woolens, which have often been used for the 
inaugural suits of the Presidents. 

Though a strong Bepublican, Mr. Sykes has never cared to hold 
public office except to serve on the Eockville Common Council for a 
period of seven years. He gives his time consistently to his re- 
sponsibilities as captain of a large industry. He is a member of 

178 




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DAVID ALLEN STKES. 181 

Fayette Lodge of Masons and a regular attendant at the Congre- 
gational Church. 

Mr. Sykes is a director in the Hockanum Mills Company, the 
Eockville National Bank, the George Maxwell Memorial Library 
and the Eockville Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is a trustee 
of the George Sykes Manual Training School and of the Eockville 
Savings Bank. 

On the twenty-first day of January, 1885, Mr. Sykes married 
Clara Darling of North Adams. Their two children are Arthur 
Darling, a student at Shefiield Institute, Yale University, and Corinne 
Hall, now at Dana Hall, Wellesley. 



FREDERICK HOMER QUINTARD. 

alTINTARD, FREDERICK HOMES, secretary and treasurer 
of The C. S. Trowbridge Company, Box Manufacturers, 
South Norwalk, Connecticut, state representative, a prominent 
club man and in many other ways a leading citizen of his town, was 
bom in Norwalk, January 24th, 1857. The list of his ancestors is long 
and interesting and includes many prominent early colonists. The 
Quintards are of French Huguenot stock, the first known in America 
being Isaac Quintard who was born in Lusignan, France, and settled 
in New York City in 1697. On the maternal side Mr. Quintard is 
descended from Kichard Lounsbury who came from England to Rye, 
New York, before 1672. Other noteworthy ancestors were Henry 
Whitney who came from Barkhamsted, England, to Long Island in 
1665, Robert Lockwood who settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, 
about 1630, Richard Raymond who came from Essex, England, in 

1634, Thomas Rumball who came to Boston on the "Free Love" in 

1635, Thomas Hyatt who settled in Stratford in 1641, Rev. Henry 
Smith, an early settler of Wethersfield in 1639, Daniel Scofield who 
located in Stamford previous to 1670, Robert Stewart, Matthias 
Sention and many others. 

The parents of Frederick Quintard were Francis E. and Matilda 
Lounsbury Quintard. The father was a merchant and manufacturer 
of furniture in Norwalk and the mother was a sister of the two 
ex-governors of Connecticut, George E. and Phineas C. Lounsbury. 
She died when Frederick was quite young. 

City life was Frederick Quintard's experience in boyhood and his 
lot was easier than that of many boys of his day. He attended public, 
high and private schools and intended to go to college but when the 
time came he decided to enter his father's business instead. After 
a year's business experience he entered the employ of his uncles in the 
manufacture of shoes at South Norwalk, remaining in their employ 
some eight or nine years. In 1883 he associated himself with George 
E. Lounsbury in the manufacture of shoes at Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
as secretary and treasurer of the company. 

182 




( 3^C^ C ^ f^Q 



FREDERICK HOMER QUINTARD. 185 

In 1893, on account of poor health, he retired from active business 
for a time. 

In 1906 Mr. Quintard decided to re-enter active business and 
became secretary and treasurer of The C. S. Trowbridge Company, 
Box Manufacturers, at South Norwalk, Connecticut, his present 
postion. 

In addition to his business interests Mr. Quintard has been active 
in public life in both city and state, having held the office of council- 
man, tax collector and assessor, the two latter offices by appointment. 
In 1906 he was elected state representative and re-elected in 1908. 
In politics he has always been loyal to the Republican Party. 

Mr. Quintard is a Mason, a member of St. John's Lodge, No. 6, 
of Norwalk. He is also a member of Clinton Commandery, No. 3, 
Knights Templar, and of Pyramid Temple, Mystic Shrine. He is 
a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, and of all the 
leading local clubs, in many of which he has held office. He is presi- 
dent of the Roxbury Club, secretary of the Norwalk Country Club, a 
director of the Norwalk Club and a member of the Council of the 
South Norwalk Club. He is also a member of the Norwalk Yacht 
Club and of the Norwalk Historical Society. His church membership 
is in the Congregational denomination. For recreation he enjoys 
hunting and fishing. 

Mr. Quintard makes his home at 5 Washington Street, South 
Norwalk. His wife, Mary E. Benedict Quintard, whom he married 
November 2d, 1881, comes from a long line of colonial ancestors 
prominent in both church and state. They have no children. 



THOMAS WALLACE BRYANT. 

BRYANT, THOMAS WALLACE, secretary, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager of the Union Hardware Company of Torrington, 
Litchfield County, Connecticut, mechanical inventor and a 
leader in civic, fraternal and educational affairs in that town, was 
born in New Haven, on August 18th, 1859. He is in the eighth 
generation of descent from John Bryant, who settled in Plymouth, in 
1630, and in the tenth generation of descent from William Swift, a 
maternal ancestor, who came to this country from England about 
1622. Several of his early ancestors were passengers in the Mayflower. 
Mr. Bryanf s father was Clark Bishop Bryant, a clock manufacturer, 
who was for thirty years the superintendent of the New Haven Clock 
Company. Mr. Bryant's mother was Josephine Swift Bryant. 

As most of his youth was spent in New Haven, Thomas Bryant 
had all the advantages of the fine public schools of that city. He 
attended the Wooster School and the Hillhouse High School. After 
two years in the high school he left to study practical drawing and 
designing under Rudolph Christiansen at Meriden, Connecticut. This 
was in the fall of 1877 and he continued his studies in drawing and 
designing for about three years. 

In 1880, at the age of twenty-one, he went back to New Haven 
to be his father's assistant superintendent in the New Haven Clock 
Company. Later in the same year he became superintendent and 
treasurer of the Electrical Supply Company of Ansonia. Since 1888 
he has been secretary, treasurer, and manager of the Union Hardware 
Company of Torrington, one of the largest and best known skate 
manufacturing industries in the world. Since his connection with 
that company Mr. Bryant has taken out many patents of his own 
inventions," many of them of great value and originality. In 1892 
he invented a method for making skate runners, which completely 
revolutionized that art. 

Mr. Bryant is actively interested in all Torrington affairs. For 
four years he has served on the Torrington board of education. He is 

186 



THOMAS WALLACE BRYANT. 189 

a Republican in politics. He is a Mason, a member of the Sons of 
the Revolution, and of several local social clubs. He is an Episcopalian 
in creed and belongs to Christ Church, Torrington. He is fond of 
travel and has been in Cuba and various parts of Europe. 

On April 30th, 1907, Mr. Bryant married Miss Marie Elsie 
Hooghkirk of New Haven. On March 24th, 1908, twin daughters 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, Rebecca Swift and Marie Elsie. 
Their home is on Migeon Avenue, Torrington. 

The Union Hardware Company is one of the largest, if not the 
very largest, skate manufacturing concerns in the world, as well as 
one of the most progressive and up-to-date. Mr. Bryant assumed its 
management long before he reached the prime of life, and has held 
it continually and with ever increasing success through two decades. 
Few men become captains of industry before they are thirty years 
of age, and by the simple force of their own ability and worth. 



HON. LYMAN ALLEN MILLS. 

MILLS, Hon. LYMAN ALLEN, was born in Middlefield 
(then a part of Middletown), Middlesex County, February 
25th, 1841, the son of Eev. Charles Lewis Mills, a Congre- 
gational minister, a graduate of Yale College in the class of 1835, 
and Elizabeth Coe Lyman, daughter of William Lyman, of Middle- 
lield, Conn. He comes from old New England stock, descending 
through both his father and mother from Kobert Coe, of the county 
of Suffolk, England, who emigrated to this country in 1634. Through 
his father he is descended from John and Priscilla Alden, of the 
Mayflotver Pilgrims (1620). His mother, Elizabeth Coe Lyman, was 
a descendant of Thomas Welles, fourth governor of the Colony of 
Connecticut, who served in 1655 and 1658; and of Eichard Lyman, 
who came to America from High Ongar. county of Essex, England, 
in 1631. Mr. Mills is nephew of the late David Lyman. 

In boyhood Lyman A. Mills attended the academies of Durham, 
Conn., and North Bridgewater, Mass., and early developed an apti- 
tude for business and financial affairs. He has devoted himself chiefly 
to manufacturing and to the care and management of various 
properties and estates, in which his great energy and native ability 
have won signal success. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Mills represented his town in the 
General Assembly of 1895, serving on the committee on finance. 
In November, 1898, he was elected lieutenant-governor of the 
State of Connecticut by a handsome majority — Middlesex County 
gave to him her largest vote given at that time on the state ticket. 
Lieut.-Gov. Mills was an eminently successful presiding officer of 
the Senate. His integrity and fidelity in every trust have gained 
for him an honorable reputation, and secured the confidence and 
respect of the people of his state. He is president of The Lyman 
Gun Sight Corporation, a trustee of the Middletown Savings Bank, 
a director of the American Wringer Company, and president of The 
Levi E. Coe Library Association, and holds other positions of trust 

190 





^0^^^^^^^^_ 



HON. LYMAN ALLEN MILLS. 193 

and responsibility. He has been identified with the Congregational 
Church in Middlefield, and interested in its management for nearly 
fifty years. 

Mr. Mills has been for many years a breeder of choice Jersey 
cattle, and has advanced the interests of dairy farming in America 
through the well-known herds of JeTseys raised upon his farm. 
Jerseys bred by him have become famous prize-winners, including 
the cow Figgis, champion and grand champion at the great exhi- 
bition of Jerseys at the World's Fair at St. Louis in 1904. 

On June 6th, 1866, Mr. Mills married Jane Louisa, daughter of 
Deacon Alfred Andrews, New Britain, Conn., the author of the 
" Andrews Family Genealogy," " Stephen Hart and His Descendants,'' 
and " The History of New Britain." Mrs. Mills traces her lineage 
to the emigrant ancestors Thomas Hooker, Thomas Welles, fourth 
governor of the Connecticut Colony, and Capt. Thomas Willet, one 
of the Plymouth pilgrims, who became the first mayor of New York. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mills are Herbert Lee, born February 
26th, 1868, and Charles Bowland, born January 28th, 1877, who 
live, respectively, in New Britain and Middlefield. 

Lyman A. Mills is a member of the Connecticut Society of the 
Sons of the American Bevolution. He is a keen lover of art and 
devotes much time to the study and collection of fine paintings. 
His house, built in 1787, is filled with rare paintings by American, 
Dutch and early English masters. 



WILLIAM ELMER SEELEY. 

SEELEY, WILLIAM ELMEE, late bank president and public 
man of Bridgeport, was not only esteemed and prominent for 
his part in banking and political matters of state-wide im- 
portance but was also well known for his active part in Masonry 
and in patriotic, social and charitable affairs in his community. He 
was born in the town of Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, on 
September 19th, 1840, and died at his summer home in Lakeville 
on August 25th, 1905. His parents were Seth and Charity Wilson 
Seeley and his father was a farmer by occupation. Through him 
Mr. Seeley traced his ancestral line back to Eobert Seeley, who came 
from England to Salem, Massachusetts, in 1630. He afterwards 
settled in Watertown, Massachusetts, where he remained for six years 
at the end of which he located in Wethersfield, Connecticut. Later 
ancestors took part in the Eevolution. 

After receiving a common school education William E. Seeley 
began his banking career in early manhood as a clerk in the Farmers' 
Bank in Bridgeport. In 1864 he was one of the organizers of the 
First National Bank of Bridgeport and became the first cashier of 
that bank. In 1892 he was made president of the First National and 
held that office until his death. 

For many years Mr. Seeley was also president of the Peoples 
Savings Bank of Bridgeport, holding the office up to the time of his 
death. He was president of the Connecticut Bankers' Association 
for a number of years. He was an authority on all matters of finance 
and was regarded as one of the most experienced and soundest bankers 
in the state. 

The public services which Mr. Seeley rendered were military, 
political and civic. He served in the state militia for a number of 
years, advancing from adjutant to lieutenant-colonel, his rank when 
he resigned. In 1901 he was elected state senator and during his 
term of office he was chairman of the committee on finance. From 
1903-5 he was state comptroller and he filled this office with great 

194 




-'■"•-.- _■!'-■ 




WILLIAM ELMER SEELEY. 



197 



credit and satisfaction to all. He was always loyal to the Kepublican 
party and was at one time a delegate to the Kepublican National Con- 
vention. He held many municipal offices in Bridgeport, was fire 
commissioner for eight years, police commissioner for three years, 
and also held the offices of councilman, alderman, city treasurer, and 
manager of the city sinking fund. 

Mr. Seeley was a thirty-third degree Mason, a member of the 
Sons of the American Eevolution, of the Society of Colonial Wars, 
the Union League Club and Transportation Club of New York, the 
Union League Club of New Haven, the Hartford Club of Hartford, 
and the Seaside, Algonquin, Brooklawn, Yacht, and Outing clubs 
of Bridgeport. He was a past grand commander of the Knights 
Templars of Connecticut. He was president of both the Seaside and 
Brooklawn clubs at different times and was very prominent socially. 
He was a member of the Congregational Church. 

An able and honorable financier, a faithful public official and a 
patriotic, unselfish and substantial citizen, William E. Seeley was 
for one half a century one of Bridgeport's most influential and 
respected business and public men. It was well said of him on the 
occasion of his death in August, 1905, that " Nothing bad was ever 
known of him and much that was uncommonly good, while no man's 
word was better than his." 

William E. Seeley was married in October, 1861, to Jane Eliza- 
beth Sterling. He is survived by five sons, William E., Jr., Frederick 
Sterling, Henry Sterling, Bobert Clinton, and Frank Earle. 



SIDNEY EDWIN HAWLEY. 

HAWLEY, SIDNEY EDWIN, high sheriff of Fairfield County, 
is one of the great Republican leaders of the state. He 
comes of the very best New England stock and his career 
from childhood to middle life presents an admirable study of the 
making of an American. First the humble years on the farm, then 
the energetic efforts for advancement as manhood approached, with 
the ultimate triumphs of political leadership and business success, 
all displaying those qualities which appeal so strongly to the great 
majority of his fellow countrymen. 

Sidney Edwin Hawley first saw the light of day on November 
39th, 1844, in the town of Brookfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut. 
He was the son of the late Charles and Anna (Merwin) Hawley. 
His father was a farmer, a man of prominence in Brookfield. He 
held many public offices and was at one time county commissioner. 
Sheriff Hawley is a direct descendant of Joseph Hawley, who was a 
native of Parwick, Derby County, England, and came to Boston in 
1629. From Boston the Hawleys moved to Stratford about 1646 and 
there founded the great Hawley family that has been so active in the 
history of the State of Connecticut and of Fairfield County for nearly 
three centuries. Hawleyville, in Newtown, marked the northward 
movement of the family for a time. It was founded by Benjamin 
Hawley, the great-grandfather of Sidney Edwin Hawley. Later on 
Brookfield proved attractive to the family and there Sheriff Hawley 

was born. 

Like so many other men of recognized leadership, Sheriff Hawley's 
early years were marked by the hardest kind of farm work. Like 
so many others, too, this hard work, with its privations and self- 
denials, was an inspiration to greater things. As an additional spur 
to advancement, he assumed with willingness the responsibility of 
assisting in the support of his aged parents. In the rugged school 
offered bv these conditions he learned the lessons that were to shape 

198 




sJ\& JVZ~i**&!y 



SIDNEY EDWIN HAWLEY. 201 

his character and direct his mind towards those qualities which make 
great friendships and invite marked confidences. 

Mr. Hawley's educational opportunities were limited to those 
which he could obtain in the public schools and in a private academy 
of his native town. His early manhood was taken up with farming. 
The business of tobacco raising and packing attracted his attention 
and he engaged in it with success. 

But it was in politics that he was to make his mark, and it was 
not long after reaching man's estate that he became interested in the 
affairs of his town. He was attracted to the Eepublican party, then 
establishing itself as the political organization of progress, although 
his native Brookfield was a Democratic stronghold. He was sent to 
Hartford as a representative in 1886 and was re-elected in 1888. In 
1889 he was named as a member of the State Board of Agriculture, 
and the same year was appointed to the position of deputy collector 
of internal revenue. 

It was Mr. Hawley's removal from the latter office by the advent 
of a Democratic administration at Washington that opened to him 
the way to the great position he was to fill for so many years with 
immense credit to himself and benefit to the people of Fairfield 
County. The fall election of 1894 saw him a candidate for sheriff 
against one of the most popular Democrats in the county, and when 
the votes were counted he was elected by a large majority. He was 
re-elected by heavy majorities in 1898, 1902 and 1906, and has already 
held the office of sheriff longer than any other man who has filled the 
position in Fairfield County. 

Of his services as sheriff it would be difficult to speak too highly. 
In running down criminals, solving mysterious crimes, protecting 
property and managing the county jail, Sheriff Hawley has ever shown 
marked fidelity to public interests. On no occasion has he been found 
wanting, and his record as a public servant shows how strongly he 
has held that a public office is a public trust. 

It is as a party leaden that Mr. Hawley stands most prominently 
before the people of the state. Closely allied with the late Samuel 
Fessenden, he engaged in some tremendous political battles. Staunch 
in his friendships, he preferred to risk his own political future 
rather than betray a friend or go back on his word. It is this quality 
that appeals so strongly to his fellow citizens. Coupled with it is 
8 



202 



SIDNEY EDWIN HAWLEY. 



a keen knowledge of human nature and an ability to draw support. 
All these things combine to make him one of the most powerful factors 
in the Eepublican party of Fairfield County. 

Mr. Hawley is a member of many fraternal organizations. He 
is a thirty-second degree Mason, an Odd Fellow, an Elk, a member of 
the Eed Men, and the Grange. His club connections include mem- 
bership in the Seaside, Algonquin, Calumet, Park City Yacht and 
Bridgeport Yacht Clubs. He has acted as trustee of the CoDgTega- 
tional Church in Brookfield for many years. His favorite diversions 
are driving, fishing and traveling. He was married in June, 1871, 
to Miss Sarah A. Roe. They have no children. 

In looking back over his life Mr. Hawley has no hesitation in 
saying that the influence of his mother had a marked power in shaping 
his moral, spiritual and intellectual faculties, while he found in the 
histories of his country, state and town, and in the biographies of the 
early settlers, which told of their hardships and struggles, the reading 
that was to be of great assistance. His motto for any young American 
about to start in life would be : " Bely upon God and the best that is 
in you and you will win." 




,_: ...-;■-_- j J.--,- ■-'■■■" 




WILLIAM EDWARD BURNHAM. 

BURNHAM, WILLIAM E., one of Bridgeport's leading manu- 
facturers and most progressive business men, was born in 
Springfield, Massachusetts, on November 25th, 1856. He is 
descended from Thomas Burnham, who came from England to Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, in 1635, and was one of the true-blue Puritans. 
On the maternal side Mr. Burnham is a descendant of Uri Ferree, 
an early settler of Springfield, Massachusetts. Mr. Burnham's father 
was the late Edward Goodwin Burnham, one of Bridgeport's promi- 
nent manufacturers, who was president of the Eaton, Cole and Burn- 
ham Company, state senator and a member of the Bridgeport Board 
of Public Works. His wife, W. E. Burnham's mother, was Mary 
Ferree, a good woman, whose influence on her son's early life was 
strongly for his good in every way. 

When he was a very small boy, William E. Burnham's family 
settled in Bridgeport, where he received his early education. He 
attended the public schools and also studied for six years at a private 
school in Bridgeport. He then took a two years' course at Seabury 
Institute in Saybrook. He was chiefly interested in history and 
mechanics and showed marked mechanical genius. At the age of 
seventeen he went to work in his father's iron foundry, the manufac- 
turing concern of Eaton, Cole and Burnham, to learn the industry 
" from the bottom up." He began as " handy man " and worked up 
through all the various departments. This experience established 
habits of promptness, thoroughness, fidelity to his work, and a lasting 
sense of the nobility of labor. 

Rising step by step he attained to positions of increasing import- 
ance and responsibility until he became vice-president, assistant treas- 
urer and manager. His keen discernment and sagacity were invaluable 
to the corporation and became vital factors in its rapid growth and 
development into one of the largest and best known brass and iron 
industries in Connecticut. In 1905 he sold out his interest to Chicago 

205 



206 



WILLIAM EDWARD BURNHAM. 



parties and retired from active connection with the Eaton, Cole and 
Burnham Company. 

Since retiring from the Eaton, Cole and Burnham Company, 
Mr. Burnham has been president of the Pacific Iron Works, director 
of the Connecticut National Bank, treasurer of the Thomas Phillips 
Company, director of the Bridgeport Crucible Company, the Bridge- 
port Hospital, and the Bridgeport Public Library. 

In 1897 Mr. Burnham was appointed park commissioner and 
served seven years. In 1908 he was elected delegate to the Republican 
National Convention. 1909 he was one of the Republican presidential 
electors for Connecticut who helped cast the state's vote for Mr. Taft. 
He has always been a loyal Republican but never an office seeker. 

William E. Burnham is a member of the order of Knights Temp- a 
lar, Pyramid Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, the Order 
of Elks, the Algonquin, Calumet, and Bridgeport Yacht Clubs, all of 
Bridgeport, and of the Union League Club of New Haven, Conn., 
the New York Yacht Club, and the New York Athletic Club. He 
is fond of out-door life and an enthusiastic devotee of such sports as 
fishing, driving, and various athletic recreations. He is an Episco- 
palian in creed. He is interested in all amusements for the public 
good and is a director of the Boys' Club of Bridgeport. 

On December 10th, 1884, Mr. Burnham married Hattie J. 
Kiefer. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Burnham. 
Their home is on Fairfield Avenue, Bridgeport. 

Mr. Burnham bears an enviable reputation for integrity, honor, 
progressive business ability and good citizenship, and his advice to 
young men commands attention and deserves conscientious following. 
He says: "Attend to your duties closely, work hard for your em- 
ployer's interest. Don't spend every cent you earn but start a nest 
egg of saving for the future, be honest and temperate, and above all 
be self-reliant, active, energetic, and you will succeed." 




CjrfyriW ^ir^ldro^^p^ 



CYPRIAN STRONG BRAINERD, JR. 

BRAINERD, CYPRIAN STRONG, lawyer and business man 
of Haddam, Connecticut, and Brooklyn, New York, was born 
in the town of Haddam, Middlesex County, on August 4th, 
1838. The Brainerd family is an old and important one in Haddam 
and was founded there as long ago as 1662, when Daniel Brainerd 
settled there after his i mm igration from England. Mr. Brainerd's 
father was Cyprian Strong Brainerd, a farmer, who owned and oper- 
ated granite quarries and was county commissioner and state repre- 
sentative. His wife, Mr. Brainerd's mother, was Plorilla Hull 
Brainerd, and her English ancestors were also among the earliest 
settlers in Connecticut. Of his mother and her great influence Mr. 
Brainerd says : " Her sincere piety, faithful love, patience, prudence, 
industry and wise economy were an inspiration to the highest and 
noblest virtues." 

The family homestead at Haddam, built by his great-grand- 
father, Josiah Brainerd, in 1792, was Cyprian Brainerd's home 
throughout his boyhood, which was a busy and wholesome one. 
When not at school he worked at his father's farm or at the quarries. 
Living so close to the Connecticut River he necessarily had constant 
practice in swimming, skating and boating in all seasons and variety 
of weather and thus cultivated coolness, courage and self-dependence, 
and laid the foundation for the rugged health and physique with 
which he has been so greatly blessed during his whole life. His moral, 
intellectual and spiritual development was correspondingly vigorous, 
for he was brought up in the daily hearing of the Bible at family 
prayers, and to study such books as " A Catechism of Health," and 
the works of Shakespeare, Scott, Carlyle, Coleridge, Tennyson and 
Ruskin. He attended the Haddam district school and the Brainerd 
Academy at Haddam, of which his father was a trustee. At the age 
of eighteen he entered Yale College, where he was graduated with 
the degree of A.B. in 1850. Among his classmates were many dis- 
tinguished men, including Ellis H. Roberts, United States treasurer, 

209 



210 CYPRIAN STRONG BRAINERD, JE. 

Martin Kellogg, late president of the University of California, Kobert 
Coit, New London's well-known lawyer and politician, and Hubert 
A. Newton, late professor of mathematics in Yale College. 

The first five years after his graduation from Yale Mr. Brainerd 
spent in teaching. He studied medicine for a while but gave it up 
in 1855, when he went to New York to read law in the office of his 
cousin, Eoswell C. Brainerd, who was for eight years surrogate of 
King's County, New York. In 1857 he became private secretary to 
Samuel Powell, mayor of Brooklyn, New York, and served in this 
capacity nearly three years. In 1860 he entered into partnership 
with his uncle in the business firm of C. E. Hull and Company, in 
New York. In 1863 he was admitted to the New York bar. He 
maintained his interest in the firm of C. E. Hull and Company for 
many years, but during the past twenty years he has been chiefly 
engaged as an executor and manager of estates and as a director 
in a number of business institutions, including the Franklin Bank 
of New York, the Coal Mining Company of Cartersville, Illinois, 
and the Middlesex Hospital. He divides his time between Brooklyn 
and Haddam, spending the months from May to November in his 
ancestral home in the latter place. 

Mr. Brainerd is a member of the Long Island Historical Society, 
the New England Society of Brooklyn, the Long Island Yale Alumni 
Association, and the Montauk Club of Brooklyn. In politics he is 
an independent voter. He is a deacon in the First Congregational 
Church of Haddam and is strongly attached to that venerable church, 
of which so many of his ancestors were members. In 1900, when 
that church celebrated its bicentennial, he placed in it a fine pipe 
organ as a memorial of his parents, who were devoted members of 
that church for many years. While in Brooklyn Mr. Brainerd attends 
the Church of the Pilgrims. 

Cyprian S. Brainerd is a strong advocate of vigorous outdoor 
life, the secret of his own well-preserved health through such a long, 
busy life. He deems walking, rowing, sailing, fishing and all out- 
of-door recreations to be necessary as pleasures and exercise. He also 
believes in a vigorous intellectual development and enjoys the culture 
of travel, music, literature and natural history. He has made many 
journeys to Europe and has visited Great Britain, France, Germany, 
Switzerland and Italy. His scholarly interests are well embodied 



CYPRIAN STRONG BRAINERD, JR. 211 

in his splendid gift to his native town — the Brainerd Memorial 
Library, dedicated in 1908. 

For guidance in one's life work, Mr. Brainerd advises young 
men to study the first three verses of the " First Psalm," and Phi- 
lippians IV, verse 8, for the " Second Lesson." He adds this wise 
advice : " Study the lives of the wise and good who have been bene- 
factors to the human race, whether in high or in humble station." 
" Not what one gets but what he gives will be found in the retrospect 
most satisfying and rewarding." Surely his own long, faithful life, 
with its three-fold success and development in the world of business 
and knowledge, in mental and bodily robustness and in depth of 
character and Christianity, is an excellent one to study. 

On the second of May, 1877, Mr. Brainerd married Harriett E. 
Harrison, a near relative of ex-Governor Henry B. Harrison, and the 
daughter of Frederick H. Harrison, a prominent New York merchant. 
No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Brainerd. 



WILLIAM RICHARD BRIXEY. 

BEIXEY, WILLIAM EICHAED, of Seymour, Connecticut, is 
one of the most successful and best known manufacturers in 
the State. He was born in Southampton, Hampshire County, 
England, May 11th, 1851. His father, Eichard Brixey, was a builder, 
who married Elizabeth Jarvis and they lived in Southampton and 
vicinity. While Mr. Brixey is by birth an Englishman, he is in all 
other respects thoroughly American. He became a citizen of the 
United States in 1879. He was educated at the Chippingongar 
Grammar School, Essex, England. At the age of sixteen he went into 
business as a clerk in the office of a ship and insurance broker in 
London, England. This position he resigned in 1868 to follow the 
British Mercantile Marine Service, in which he served in various 
capacities, finally commanding his own vessel and visited the prin- 
cipal ports of the world, around which he sailed several times, gaining 
an enviable experience which has served him well. He came to this 
country in 1878, swallowed the anchor and went to business with his 
brother-in-law, Mr. A. G. Day. Mr. Day was one of the pioneers in 
the rubber industry in this country and was the inventor of kerite, 
the famous insulation used on wires and cables for electrical work. 
Mr. Day had married Mr. Brixey's sister, Sarah A. Brixey, in 1877, in 
England, where he usually went for his vacations. His plant was at 
Seymour, Connecticut, and it was here that Mr. Brixey first entered 
the business which he has since built up so wonderfully and which 
has achieved a world-wide reputation. 

In 1879, Mr. Brixey married Frances Nancy De Wolfe of 
Seymour, the youngest daughter of Alvah G. De Wolfe, who was Mr. 
Day's chief assistant and an inventor of marked ability. Practically 
all of the original machinery used in the process of making this wire 
and cable was the product of Mr. De Wolfe's skill. Mr. Brixey 
entered the factory as a workman to learn the business and finally 
worked himself up to superintendent. Upon the death of Mr. Day he 

212 




> -■_:/ -~ /_■ &&&, ~. L J £ 




WILLIAM RICHAKD BKIXEY. 215 

became general manager of the business, which passed entirely into 
his hands upon the death of his sister, Mrs. Day. 

Mr. Brixey, while a very strict disciplinarian, is highly respected 
because of his character and ability and is greatly endeared to all 
his employees, and, in fact, to all with whom he comes in contact, on 
account of his innate kindness, geniality and generous disposition. 
He is a man of much personal magnetism and possesses great business 
ability. These qualities, together with an indomitable will and 
natural perseverance, have enabled him to build up his business on a 
very solid and substantial basis. Not only is he a man of keen judg- 
ment on business propositions, but he has also made many and vast 
improvements in the machinery, method and processes connected with 
his business in the manufacture of all types of kerite insulated wires 
and cables for every kind of electrical service, interior, aerial, under- 
ground and submarine. The growth of the business under Mr. 
Brixey's management has been phenomenal. Through his con- 
scientious endeavors to produce the best possible material and work- 
manship and because of the wonderful durability of his famous insula- 
tion, kerite, his products have justly earned the eminent position 
which they occupy today. Some of the largest users of his product 
are the various railroads of the country, the Western Union Telegraph 
Company, the Postal Telegraph Company, the various Bell Telephone 
Companies, street railroads, power stations, etc. One or two of the 
best known and most important contracts for his product are the 
manufacturing and laying of the Alaskan Cable from Skaguay to 
Juneau ; the furnishing of the Panama Canal Zone Cable, one of the 
most important stretches of cable in the world, connecting as it does 
the Atlantic and Pacific cables across the Isthmus, and the furnishing 
of all the signal wires and cables for the complete Pennsylvania Tun- 
nel and Terminal project from Harrison, New Jersey, under the Hud- 
son Eiver, across New York City and under the East Eiver to Long 
Island City. There are, of course, many others, but these are cited 
to show the world wide distribution and different kinds of service. 

In 1908 Mr. Brixey incorporated, his business under the name 
of the Kerite Insulated Wire & Cable Company and retired from ac- 
tive business life, leaving in charge his eldest son whom he had care- 
fully trained for the management of it. He has three sons living, his 
youngest child, a daughter, having died in infancy. The eldest son. 



216 



WILLIAM EICHAED BRIXEY. 



Richard De Wolfe Brixey, a graduate of the Sheffield Scientific School 
of Yale University, is president and general manager of the business. 
The second son, Reginald Waldo Brixey, also a graduate of the 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University, is a practicing lawyer 
in New York City, being a member of the firm of Lannon, Bailey & 
Brixey. He is also vice-president of the company. The youngest son, 
Austin Day Brixey, who possesses considerable inventive ability, is 
connected with the works at Seymour, being factory manager and 
secretary of the company. 

In September, 1909, Mr. Brixey suffered a most serious loss in 
the death of his wife who had always been a most affectionate and 
able help-mate and an ideal mother. 

William R. Brixey is pre-eminently a self-made man and his 
successful business career is due largely to his acute power of observa- 
tion of events and details, industry, perserverance, sterling honesty 
and discriminating judgment. With him there has been no such word 
as " fail," and obstacles which would have deterred most men have 
been overcome by him. He is loyal in his friendships and cautious as 
to his acquaintances, a trait well exemplified by his favorite motto : 
" Once bit, twice shy." Another favorite saying of his is " that there 
is no such word in the English language as " can't," and still another, 
" that what is worth doing, is worth doing well." 

He is an ardent lover of the manly sports, such as hunting, fish- 
ing, sailing, driving, and automobiling. He was for many years a 
member of the Old Guard of New York City with the rank of Captain. 
He is a member of the socially exclusive Brooklyn Club of Brooklyn, 
New York, and is prominent in Free Masonry, being a thirty-second 
degree Mason, connected with Chancellor Walworth Lodge, No. 271, 
F. & A. M., Triune Chapter, No. 241, R. A. M., Columbian Com- 
mandery, No. 1, K. T., Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rites, of which 
he is a life member, and Mecca Temple, A. A. 0. M. S., all of New 
York City. He is also a member of the American Institute of Elec- 
trical Engineers. 

He possesses decided histrionic and musical powers which 
render him a very welcome guest and have earned for him the title 
of " Old King Cole " from his remarkable rendition of that jovial song. 

He is a Republican in politics and is affiliated with the Episcopal 
Church. He is a man of deep feeling and has always been devoted 



WILLIAM EIOHAED BEIXET. 217 

to his family. He was seriously injured in the " subway " Murray 
Hill explosion in 1902. He suffered injuries to which an ordinary 
man would have succumbed, but owing to his wonderful constitution 
and with the aid of the best surgeons in the country, he pulled 
through. 



HERBERT R. COFFIN. 

COFFIN, HERBERT R., late manufacturer of Windsor Locks, 
Hartford County, Connecticut, was the proprietor and mana- 
ger of the paper, flour and grain mills known as the firm of 
C. H. Dexter & Sons, vice-president of the Windsor Locks and 
Warehouse Point Bridge Company, and president of the Connecticut 
River Water Company. He was born in Rindge, New Hampshire, on 
August 6th, 1840. His parents were the late George and Sarah 
(Scovell) Coffin, the former being a manufacturer of flannels and 
woolen goods, first in Vermont, later in New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts, and finally in Windsor Locks. The family has a distin- 
guished ancestry, being descendants of the same stock as Admiral Sir 
Isaac Coifin of the British Navy who, in 1826, visited the island of 
Nantucket, the site of the first settlement of the family in this country, 
and established a school in their memory, endowing it with a fund 
of ten thousand dollars. 

As the location of his father's business was often changed, it 
followed that Herbert Coffin's education was acquired in several 
different schools. The chief of these were the public schools of 
Ludlow, Vermont, the Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, New 
Hampshire, and the Conference Academy, of West Poultney, Ver- 
mont. He left school at the age of sixteen and became a clerk in the 
dry goods commission house of Upson, Tucker & Company, in Boston, 
with whom he remained for three years. The next two years he was 
similarly employed by W. F. Feld & Company, one of Boston's large 
importing concerns. Upon leaving them he returned to Rindge and 
helped his father in the wool grading and scouring industry. They 
formed the firm of Herbert R. Coffin & Company, which they moved to 
Windsor Locks two years later. In 1867 Herbert Coffin sold out his 
interest in the business to his father and became a clerk in the office 
of the Star Paper Mills at Windsor Locks, which were established 
by C. H. Dexter in 1835. A year later he became a member of the 
firm of C. H. Dexter & Sons, and afterwards in 1886 sole proprietor 

218 




f f)?/;u 



HERBERT R. COFFIN. 



221 



of the business. He developed the business until it now employs a 
hundred hands and manufactures large quantities of high-grade 
paper, making specialties of tissue, typewriting, copying and cover 
paper, all widely marketed. 

Mr. Coffin was a director in the Connecticut Eiver Banking 
Company, of Hartford, and in the Medlicott Company, manufacturers 
of knit goods, Windsor Locks, as well as president of the Connecticut 
Eiver Water Company and vice-president of the Windsor Locks and 
Warehouse Point Bridge Company. In politics he was a loyal 
Eepublican. For many years he was a deacon in the Congregational 
Church. 

On December 4th, 1866, Mr. Coffin married Mrs. Julia Sargent 
Haskell (nee Dexter), widow of the late Thomas Haskell, of Windsor 
Locks, and daughter of the late C. H. Dexter. Three children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Coffin, Arthur Dexter and Herbert E., Jr., who 
now compose the firm of C. H. Dexter & Sons, and Grace Pierson 
who married Charles E. Cooley, Jr. 



HERBERT R. COFFIN, JR. 

COFFIN, HEKBEET B., JE., manufacturer, member of Legis- 
lature, and a leader in public affairs in Windsor Locks, 
Hartford County, Connecticut, is a member of the firm of 
C. H. Dexter & Sons, the large paper manufacturing industry of 
Windsor Locks, and in many other ways a man of prominence in local 
affairs as well as in State politics. He is a son of the late Herbert 
E. Coffin, whose life is sketched elsewhere in this work, and Julia 
Haskell Dexter Coffin, who was the widow of the late Thomas Haskell 
when she married the elder Herbert E. Coffin. The present Herbert 
E. Coffin was born in Windsor Locks on January 15th, 1871, and 
received his education in the public schools of his native town. 

After leaving school Mr. Coffin entered the paper industry of 
which his father was proprietor, C. H. Dexter & Sons, and he has 
made paper manufacturing his chief business interest. Ever since 
he attained his majority he has been identified with the political life 
of the community and with the promotion of all movements for the 
betterment of his town in industrial, educational and moral progress. 
He is now serving his second term as state representative from his 
town. During his first term in the Assembly he bent all his energies 
toward the introduction of the bill to have the State buy and main- 
tain the four bridges over the Connecticut Eiver, the passing of 
which and the subsequent freeing of the bridge at Windsor Locks 
was the occasion of great rejoicing in that town. His fellow-townsmen 
expressed their appreciation not only by the gift of a loving cup but 
by making him the unanimous choice for representative regardless 
of party lines. His zeal in freeing the bridge is of particular signifi- 
cance and merit, for he was at the time a director and stockholder in 
the Windsor Locks and Warehouse Point Bridge and Ferry Company. 
During his second term as representative he has served as a member 
of the committee on incorporations and as chairman of the committee 
on assignment of seats. He was a member of the committees on 
education and woman's suffrage in his first term in the Legislature. 

222 




- - • 6? eawbm. ■ Br, - - 



HERBERT E. COFFIN, JR. 225 

His re-election not only reflects the gratitude of his townsmen for his 
valued services in freeing their bridge but also his ability to represent 
his town at the Capitol with a loyalty, uprightness and zeal that 
made his first public honors seem but the beginning of a long political 
career. He has always been keenly interested in education and was the 
chief instrument in establishing the excellent free high school in 
Windsor Locks. He is now serving his third term as a member of the 
town board of education of which he is the financial secretary. He is 
a director of the Windsor Locks Trust Company, his only business tie 
outside of the paper industry with which he is so closely connected. 

Mr. Coffin is married and his wife's maiden name was Jean T. 
Warburton. His strongest fraternal bond is with the Masonic Lodge, 
Euclid No. 109, F. & A. M., and he is the president of the club con- 
nected with this lodge. Like his father he is a Republican in politics, 
a Congregationalist in his church relations, and a citizen whose creed 
is service of the public in all good work for the progress and advance- 
ment of the people. 



GUSTAF BIRGER CARLSON 

CARLSON, GUSTAF BIRGER, attorney-at-law of Middle- 
town, Connecticut, was born in Hamraar, Sweden, June 10th, 
1870, the son of Otto F. Carlson and Johanna L. Carlson, 
who came to Connecticut in the spring of 1872 and settled in the 
Town of Haddam, where his father, who is a farmer and contractor, 
still resides. 

Gustaf B. Carlson spent his boyhood in Haddam. He prepared 
for college at Mount Hermon School, Mount Hermon, Massachusetts, 
graduating in 1891. In 1891 he entered Yale College and graduated 
in the academic department in the class of 1895. After gradua- 
tion from college he took up the study of law, was admitted to 
the Connecticut bar in 1898, and since that time has been actively 
engaged in the practice of law at Middletown. In 1900 he was 
appointed United States Referee in bankruptcy, an office which he 
still holds, and at the present time he is corporation counsel for the 
City of Middletown. In creed he is a Congregationalist, in politics 
a Republican, and fraternally a Mason, Knight of Pythias and Elk. 

He is regarded as one of the leading attorneys of his county. 

In 1903 he was married to Mazie M. O'Conor of Baltimore, 
Maryland, by whom he has had one child, Elizabeth. 



328a 



GEORGE ROCKWELL 

ROCKWELL, GEOEGE, secretary of the International Silver 
Company, now of Waterbury, Connecticut, for many years a 
resident of Meriden, was born at Bidgefield, Connecticut, and 
is one of the three sons of Francis A. and Mary (Lee) Eockwell, who 
have figured prominently in the manufacturing and financial life of 
Meriden and Waterbury. 

He was educated in the schools of his native town and at the 
academy at Fort Edward, New York. At the age of eighteen he began 
his business career as a clerk in the First National Bank of Norwalk, 
Connecticut, where he became familiar with banking methods. At 
the end of two years he entered the office of a large wholesale house 
in New York City, where he remained several years, and during that 
time became the head of the accounting department. 

In 1880 he was elected auditor of the Meriden Britannia Com- 
pany of Meriden, Connecticut, and later became a director and secre- 
tary of that company. He held that office until the organization of 
the International Silver Company, in 1898, when be was elected 
secretary of that corporation and manager of the Eogers and Brothers 
Company, of Waterbury, one of the constituent companies of the 
International Silver Company. 

His executive ability and great energy have brought him many 
other positions of honor and responsibility. He was treasurer of the 
Eogers and Brothers Company of Waterbury, and the Meriden, Water- 
bury and Connecticut Eiver Eailroad Company, while those two cor- 
porations were carried on under those titles. He is a director in the 
International Silver Company. Manning, Bowman and Company, 
Miller Bros. Cutlery Company, of Meriden, the Mad Eiver Company 
of Waterbury, and various others. 

Mr. Eockwell is a member of the Waterbury Club, the Water- 
bury Country Club, the Home Club of Waterbury and the Home Club 
of Meriden. 

He was married in 1881 to Minnie F. Battles of Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, and has two children, George Eockwell, Jr., and Sherburne 
B. Eockwell. 

228b 




,-_,- %;/;.-- 7j j: _r.^ - 



BENEDICT MICHAEL HOLDEN. 

H OLDEN, BENEDICT MICHAEL, lawyer, justice of the 
peace, soldier, and politician, of Hartford, was born in 
Bristol on February 17th, 1874, the son of Felix Holden, a 
farmeT, and Jane Farley Holden, a worthy mother and a woman of 
fine character and aspiring ideals. Through both parents Mr. Holden 
is of Irish ancestry. The Holden family was founded in this country 
by Owen Holden, Mr. Holden's great-grandfather. 

Actuated even in early childhood by an ambition to become a 
lawyer, Benedict Holden worked diligently all through his boyhood 
to earn money for his legal education. Outside of school hours he 
worked on the farm and in a factory and thus established habits of 
industry, self-reliance and independence at an early age. He read a 
great deal, especially on such subjects as philosophy and history and 
such law works as the " Connecticut Practice Act." Blackstone and 
Shakespeare were his favorite and most helpful authors. After com- 
pleting the course of study offered by the district and high school 
of Bristol, he entered the law department of Yale University. He 
was graduated from Yale Law School with the degree of LL.B. in 
1895. 

Enlisting at the outbreak of the War with Spain he gave credit- 
able and patriotic service to his country. He also gave three years 
(from 1898 to 1901) of service in the Philippines, during which time 
he was Battalion Sergeant Major in 2d Battalion, 27th U. S. Volun- 
teer Infantry. 

With the exception of this period of military service Mr. Holden 
has practiced law continuously in Bristol and Hartford ever since 
his admission to the bar. He is one of Hartford's leading lawyers 
and has had many successful cases of importance and interest. In 
1904 and again in 1906 he was elected justice of peace. He was once 
a candidate for Congress on the Democratic ticket. 

Mr. Holden is a director of St. Francis Hospital of Hartford. 
He is a member of the Hartford Club and the Home Club of Meriden. 
9 231 



232 BENEDICT MICHAEL HOLDEN. 

In creed he is a Roman Catholic. He is exceedingly fond of outdoor 
life and enjoys automobiling, fishing, hunting and walking with 
particular interest and enthusiasm. 

On November 18th, 1902, Mr. Holden married Grace Francis 
Farrell, by whom he has had one child, a daughter, Mary Holden. 
His home is at 143 Tremont Street, Hartford. 

This is the brief but sagacious and optimistic expression of Mr. 
Holden's advice to young men (and it must be remembered that in 
spite of his already attained success in life he is still a young man 
himself) : " Keep at work and do the work not for compensation 
but for the satisfaction derived from the work itself. Take on respon- 
sibilities, and then take on more, and keep smiling." 




c^ ; 



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GERALD WALDO HART. 

HART, GERALD WALDO, president of the Hart Manufactur- 
ing Company of Hartford, Connecticut, son of Samuel 
Waldo Hart and Cordelia M. Hart, was born July 23d, 1856, 
in New Britain, Connecticut, where his father was a physician and 
mayor for five terms, as well as a prominent Republican. His mother 
died soon after he was born. 

His earliest ancestor in this country was Stephen Hart, who is 
remembered as one of those followers of Thomas Hooker who came 
from England to Hartford in 1636. 

Gerald W. Hart spent his youth in a village and employed his 
time after the manner of the average New England boy. He showed 
a great aptitude for mechanics and a decided inventive genius in the 
construction of mechanical apparatus. He prepared for college at 
the Episcopal Academy in Cheshire, Connecticut, and then entered 
the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University with the class of 
1879. He was in the university freshman crew of 1876, and 
was bow oar on the university crew of 1877, and still retains an 
interest in yachting and outdoor sports. He received a thorough 
training in mechanical engineering and obtained an equally thorough 
theoretical knowledge of mechanics, which was a good foundation for 
the practical experience he was to have in all mechanical and electrical 
matters in his life work. 

In 1880 he entered the employ of the Thomson-Houston Electric 
Company in New Britain as their first employee and he remained 
with them until 1887, when he left that company and went to 
Kansas City, where he became superintendent of the Edison Electric 
Light and Power Company and assistant general manager of the 
Kansas City Electric Light Company. 

Since 1890 he has been engaged in the manufacture of electric 
light supplies and for a number of years has been president of the 
Hart Manufacturing Company of Hartford. He has taken out a 

235 



236 GERALD WALDO HABT. 

number of patents on electrical appliances and has been particularly 
successful in the invention of electric switches. 

In 1887 Mr. Hart married Lucie I. Janes, whose father was a 
lineal descendant of William Janes, who came over with John Daven- 
port and settled in North Haven, Connecticut. 

Outside of business interests, Mr. Harf s ties are few. He is 
a consistent Eepublican. He is a member of a number of local clubs, 
including the Hartford Club, the Hartford Yacht Club, and the 
Farmington Country Club. 



JAMES BAKER WILLIAMS. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES BAKER, late manufacturer, who was 
for many years president of the J. B. Williams Company 
of Glastonbury, Connecticut, was, in that position, the 
head of one of the largest and best known soap industries in the 
world. He was the founder and developer of that enormous business 
and as such ranked high in the industrial world of his day and built 
strong foundations for future growth by his own progressive common 
sense methods, his rare energy and his sterling integrity. 

The date of Mr. Williams' birth was February 2d, 1818, and 
his birthplace was the village of Lebanon, New London County, Con- 
necticut. His parents were Solomon and Martha Baker Williams. 
On his father's side Mr. Williams' ancestry is traceable to Eobert 
Williams, a native of Norwich, England, who came to America and 
was made a freeman in Boxbury, Massachusetts, in 1638. A still 
more distinguished Englishman was a relative of his ancestors, namely, 
Oliver Cromwell, whose name was Williams until he assumed his 
historical name. Going down the line we find deacons, theologians 
and one divine, the Rev. Elisha Williams, born in 1694, who was for 
a time rector or president of Yale College, as well as Bev. Solomon 
Williams, own cousin to Jonathan Edwards, an eminent writer and 
once the president of Princeton University. We also find in the list 
of Mr. Williams' paternal ancestors members of legislature, a chief 
justice, a Congressman, and a number of others prominent in politics 
and the professions. On his mother's side Mr. Williams was a grand- 
son of the Dr. Baker who was a surgeon under Israel Putnam in the 
early days of the Bevolution. A son of Dr. Baker, Capt. James Baker, 
was an officer in the regular army during the War of 1812. 

The early boyhood of James B. Williams was passed in the old 
homestead, the home of four generations of his family. He was 
educated in the Lebanon district school and the public schools of 
East Hartford and Hartford. He also learned to do all the things 
a fanner's boy is brought up to do. In 1832 he left school and hired 

289 



240 



JAMES BAKER WILLIAMS. 



out as a farm boy to Deacon Horace Pitkin of Manchester. Two 
years later he became clerk in a store in Manchester Green, receiving 
a salary of $25.00 a year. He was determined to have a higher 
education than he had already acquired and worked at his books both 
before and after hours. As one of his employers was a druggist he 
learned chemistry and the drug business under his guidance. In 
1838 he was taken into the firm, which then became Keeney and 
Williams. He sold all but his share in the drug business two years 
later. He then entered into partnership with his brother. 

Convinced of the great demand for a high quality of shaving 
soap, Mr. Williams began a series of experiments which resulted in 
"Williams' Genuine Yankee Soap," which was so successful as to 
give rise to many imitations. The Williams brothers brought many 
suits at law in the protection of their trade mark and were always 
successful. In 1847 the business was moved to Glastonbury and 
another brother, the late William S. Williams, entered the firm, which 
became James B. Williams and Company. In 1885 a joint stock 
company was formed with James B. Williams as president and the 
corporation still has the style then adopted, the J. B. Williams Com- 
pany. The business has grown forty-fold and now embraces many 
products for toilet use which are marketed all over the world. The 
history of the industry shows great and steady success from year to 
year — from a humble beginning on borrowed capital to a mammoth, 
world-wide industry of highest repute and usefulness. 

Mr. Williams was also president of the Williams Brothers' 
Manufacturing Company of Glastonbury and the Vermont Farm 
Machine Company. He retired a number of years before his death 
and spent his winters in Florida. He died in March, 1907. He was 
state representative in 1863 and 1864 and served on the committee 
on education and engrossed bills. He was a life-long Congregation- 
alist and was a deacon of the First Church of Christ in Glastonbury. 
He was a member of the Connecticut Historical Society, the Con- 
necticut Congregational Club, the Harrison Veteran Club, the Good 
Templars, and the Sons of the American Revolution. He was hon- 
ored for his generous philanthropy, bis clean business record, his 
kindly nature and good influence in the community. 

In 1845 Mr. Williams married Jerusha M. Hubbard of Glaston- 
bury. Six children born of this union grew to maturity : Mary Ellen, 



JAMES BAKER WILUAMS. 241 

David Willard, Martha Baker, Jessie Elizabeth, James Stoddard, and 
Samuel Hubbard. 

Mrs. Williams died in 1866 and he afterwards married her sister, 
Julia E. Williams. Of this union there are two living children: 
Anne Shelton and Kichard Solomon. 



BENJAMIN MYRRICK DES JARDINS. 

DES JARDINS, BENJAMIN MYRRICK, whose rare genius 
has resulted in some of the most wonderful and valuable 
inventions of our age, is a resident of West Hartford. He 
is president of the Des Jardins Type Justifier Company and vice- 
president of the Des Jardins Computing Register Company, both 
of Hartford. 

On both sides of his family tree Mr. Des Jardins is descended 
from French nobility. He is the son of Gregoir and Mary Trudeau 
Des Jardine and the grandson of Zacherie Des Jardins, a farmer 
of Sainte Therese de Blainville, Quebec. He was born in Tyre, Michi- 
gan, on October 1st, 1858. His early education consisted partly of 
home study under the guidance of his mother and older sisters, and 
partly of courses at the public schools of Tyre and vicinity, which at 
that time afforded but meagre educational advantages. His was nat- 
urally studious and ambitious for a college education and when he 
reached the age of seventeen he left home and went to Kalamazoo Col- 
lege, where he earned his way by doing newspaper work on one of the 
local dailies. This fact had a marked influence on his future achieve- 
ments, for it was while he was employed on the newspaper that he be- 
came so impressed with the monotony and waste of time in setting type 
by hand that he resolved to use all his powers to invent a machine for 
type-setting and justifying. The ultimate result of his ambition is 
well known. Meanwhile he availed himself of the opportunity of 
studying mechanics both in and out of college, in the latter case in 
the splendid library of Senator Burrows of Kalamazoo, with whom he 
made his home during his college days. He became so filled with his 
great purpose that he left college before graduating in order to devote 
his whole time to his invention. He took into his confidence for tem- 
porary collaboration George W. O'Hara, an electrician, and Herbert 
S. Wilson, a draftsman and mechanic. It was characteristic of their 
zeal and singleness of purpose that all three men cheerfully lost their 
positions through giving too much time to the construction of their 

342 





I / ' l"" t 




1/OeS? 



BENJAMIN MTEKIOK DES JARDINS. 245 

machine. It was, however, necessary for Mr. Des Jardins to have 
some source of income and for a while he conducted a laundry in 
Kalamazoo. Later, in 1883, he compiled a directory of Kalamazoo 
and vicinity which embraced maps and a local history of great 
accuracy and value. He sold this work to a publisher, but even the 
funds thus realized and the profits from his laundry were not 
sufficient for his needs and he again took up journalistic work on the 
Kalamazoo " Gazette," continuing to devote all his leisure to his inven- 
tion. He also resumed some branches of study in college. 

His next step was to travel in behalf of his project, visiting men 
of allied interests and capitalists in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. In 
most cases they were too familiar with the obstacles that had defeated 
previous inventors to give him any substantial encouragement. With 
undaunted confidence and tenacity of purpose he went to Chicago in 
1884 and opened an office for drafting and designing machinery. His 
great skill soon won recognition, and he became secretary of the 
Inventors' Association of Illinois. He continued to do newspaper 
work and was employed on the Chicago " Inter-Ocean " and the 
Chicago "Mail." He was employed and consulted on all sorts of 
matters pertaining to mechanics. In 1888 he completed an improved 
type-setter and justifier which fire destroyed in 1891. After that he 
devoted his time to the automatic type- justifier, remodeled from his 
1888 machine, which was completed and put on the market in Hartford 
in 1894. This was followed by two other models. These successful 
and ingenious inventions gave the first solution of the problem of 
justifying movable type by mechanical means, an achievement of 
inestimable value in all printing. In 1898 the Des Jardins Type 
Justifier Company was organized at Hartford with a capital of 
$500,000, Mr. William H. Eand, of Band, McNally and Company of 
Chicago furnishing the capital, and Mr. Des Jardins being made 
president. That same year Mr. Des Jardins invented a typewriter 
adding-machine which can be attached to any typewriter and is 
operated by the regular keys, performing the additions while the 
figures are being written and being automatically disconnected at 
the end of the addition. Another valuable invention which he per- 
fected about this time is the cipher code typewriter for confidential 
correspondence known as the " cryptograph." This machine embraces 
one hundred and sixty billions of independent type settings and is of 



246 BENJAMIN MTREIOK DBS JABDINS. 

great value for secret service of the Government or of individuals. It 
is small enough to be carried in a man's pocket. In 1899 Mr. Des 
Jardins perfected a computing scale which forms an intermediate 
between a weighing scale and a cash register for computing and re- 
cording the value of goods weighed thereon. The same year the 
Des Jardins Computing Register Company was organized in Hart- 
ford with Mr. Des Jardins as vice-president and a capital of $100,000. 
He is at present engaged in perfecting a new multiplier and has 
many other plans for computing devices of great possibilities. The 
great utility and orginality of his inventions place Mr. Des Jardins 
in the foremost ranks of America's inventors and public benefactors, 
and as he is still in the prime of his activity the world of science looks 
to him for further achievements. At the recent Paris Exposition Mr. 
Des Jardins received more awards than any other Connecticut 
exhibitor. 

The Des Jardins residence, Buena Vista, West Hartford, is located 
on a high hill overlooking Hartford and the Connecticut Valley. 
Under the influence of this beautiful country environment Mr. Des 
Jardins' rare imaginative powers have found a more romantic outlet 
than mechanical inventions, for he has written some poetry of true 
merit, showing a deep love of nature and child-life. His little book 
of "Wild Flower Poems" reveals his passion for out-door life, his 
poetic instincts and his power of simple and delicate word painting. 
He is fond of social life, especially of picturesque and festive out-door 
entertainments, and makes Buena Vista a center of such gatherings 
where children are always the most welcome guests. 

On August 1st, 1889, Mr. Des Jardins married Miss Cora Viola 
Snyder, of Evanston, Illinois. Both Mr. and Mrs. Des Jardins are 
members of West Hartford Baptist Church and very active in the 
life of that church. 




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MARK SPAULDING BRADLEY, M.D. 

BRADLEY, MARK SPAULDING, M.D., physician, specialist 
in diseases of the ear, nose, throat and skin, assistant medical 
director of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
a prominent member of the staff of the Hartford Hospital and a 
director in a number of business institutions in Connecticut, lives and 
practices his profession in Hartford. He was born in East JafiErey, 
Cheshire County, New Hampshire, January 16th, 1868, the son of 
Oscar Holmes Bradley, a physician, a leading surgeon of Southern 
New Hampshire, bank president, railroad director and selectman, and 
of Julia A. Spaulding, an excellent mother in every way. On the 
paternal side Dr. Bradley is descended from Nathaniel Holmes, of 
Scotch-Irish stock, who settled in Londonderry, New Hampshire, in 
early times, coming from Ireland. His son, Jonathan Holmes, was 
Dr. Bradley's great-grandfather and a most noteworthy ancestor, for he 
was an officer under General Stark at Bennington, Vermont, and was 
with Washington at Valley Forge. On the maternal side Dr. Bradley 
is descended from Edward Spaulding, who came to America from 
England in 1630 and settled in Braintree, Massachusetts. 

The New Hampshire village in which he was born was Dr. 
Bradley's home throughout his boyhood and his early education was 
acquired there. After a year at Dartmouth College he entered 
Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University, where he was graduated 
in 1889. He then took courses at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, where he received his 
M.D. degree in 1892. He further prepared for his professional 
career by taking several post-graduate courses in European medical 
schools, and by serving as interne in the New York City Hospital. 

After completing this thorough preparatory work, Dr. Bradley 
began the active practice of medicine in South Manchester, where he 
continued to practice for ten years. Then, after a year of advanced 
study abroad, he located in Hartford, where he still practices and 
makes a specialty of diseases of the skin, ear, nose and throat. He is 

249 



260 MARK SPAULDING BKADIJBY, M.D. 

regarded as one of Hartford's most skillful specialists and has a 
very large practice. From 1904 to 1907 Dr. Bradley was medical 
director of the Hartford Life Insurance Company. He is at present 
Assistant Laryngologist and Rhinologist to the Hartford Hospital 
and Assistant Medical Director of the Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company. He is a member of the Hartford City Medical 
Society, the Hartford County Medical Society, the Connecticut State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Bradley was a director in the Hartford, Manchester and 
Rockville Tramway Company until the road was sold in 1905. He is 
secretary and director of the Manchester Light and Power Company, 
a director in the Williams Brothers Manufacturing Company of 
Glastonbury, in the Glazier Manufacturing Company of Glastonbury 
and in the Vernon Woolen Company of Vernon. 

Outside of professional and business ties Dr. Bradley has a 
number of strong social interests. He is a member of the Hartford 
Club, the Hartford Yale Alumni Association, the Yale Club of 
New York, the Theta Delta Chi college fraternity, Washington 
Commandery, Knights Templar, Pythagoras Chapter, Wadsworth 
Council and Manchester Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. He is a 
Baptist in creed and a Republican in politics. He enjoys outdoor 
life, particularly trout fishing. 

On July 5th, 1904, Dr. Bradley married Jessie B. Goodnow. 
Four children have been more to Dr. and Mrs. Bradley, all of whom 
are living : Priscilla, George Goodnow, Anne and Catherine. 

Dr. Bradley's brother, Daniel E. Bradley, is president of the 
Berlin Construction Company of Berlin, Conn. 




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EDWARD LAURENS FRISBIE. 

FEISBIE, EDWAED LAUBENS, bank president, retired manu- 
facturer, and public man of Waterbury, New Haven County, 
Connecticut, was born in that city August 22d, 1824. He 
is a descendant of Edward Prisbie, who came from Wales to America 
in the first half of the seventeenth century and joined the Hartford 
colony soon after its establishment. In 1644 he was one of the organ- 
izers of the government of the town of Totoket, now Branford. His 
lineal descendant, Elijah Frisbie, went from Branford and settled 
in Waterbury in 1750, since when the Frisbie family has been prom- 
inent in the annals of that city. Mr. Frisbie's parents were Laurens 
and Artemisia Welton Frisbie, and his father was a farmer. 

Until he was twenty-three years old, Edward Frisbie lived on 
bis father's farm, spending his time in agricultural labor after com- 
pleting the usual common school course. Then, in 1847, he entered 
the employ of the Waterbury Brass Company, assuming duties in the 
kettle department. In the spring of 1849 he went to work at casting 
brass and German silver for Brown & Elton. Later, when the firm 
was reorganized as Brown & Brothers, he remained in their employ 
and was soon put in charge of the company's casting department. In 
1854 he bought an interest in the company and through steady rises 
he attained to positions of greater and greater responsibility in the 
management of the concern. He remained with Brown & Brothers 
until 1883. 

In banking and politics Mr. Frisbie has been as influential and 
successful as he has in the manufacturing industry. He is president 
of the Waterbury Savings Bank, president of the Manufacturers 
National Bank of Waterbury, and a former trustee of the Dime 
Savings Bank of Waterbury. In 1854 and again in 1872 he repre- 
sented Waterbury in the State Legislature. He has been justice of 
peace, selectman, councilman, and assessor, and has served on many 
city boards and committees with great capability and faithfulness. 
He has always given his allegiance to the Democratic party in politics. 

253 



264 EDWAED LAUBENS FKISBIE. 

He has been a director of the Waterbury Hospital since that insti- 
tution was founded and has given much time and thought to work 
on the city board of relief. In creed he is an Episcopalian and he has 
been a warden of Trinity Church for many years. Travel has been 
bis favorite recreation and he has taken especial interest in trips 
throughout the southern states. He belonged to the local order of 
" Firemen " when it was an active organization. 

Mr. Prisbie has been married three times. In 1850 he married 
Hannah Welton, who died in 1857, leaving a son and a daughter. The 
son is Edward Laurens Prisbie, Jr., president of the Benedict & Burn- 
ham Manufacturing Company. In 1860 Mr. Frisbie married Jose- 
phine Deming, who died in 1872, leaving one daughter, Josephine. 
The present Mrs. Prisbie was Emily J. Welton, whom he married in 
1884. Mary A., Mr. Frisbie's daughter by his first wife, is now the 
wife of Ellis Phelan, the lawyer. 




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FRANK CHESTER SUMNER. 

SUMNEB, FBANK CHESTER, secretary and treasurer of the 
Hartford Trust Company, jury commissioner, bridge commis- 
sioner, and the incumbent of many other public offices in 
Hartford, is also influential in industrial and financial affairs in that 
city. He was born in Canton, Connecticut, on June 8th, 1850. His 
father was John Wesley Sumner, who represented Bolton in the 
Legislature in 1878. His mother, Mary Gleason Sumner, daughter 
of George Gleason, is still living at the advanced age of ninety-six. 
Mr. Sumner's brother, the late Hon. George Gleason Sumner, former 
lieutenant-governor, was a well-known orator and public man. The 
family ancestry is traceable to William Sumner, who came from 
Bicester, England, to Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1605, was select- 
man for twenty years and deputy to the General Court for many 
sessions. 

After receiving a good education in the public schools of Bolton 
and Hartford, Frank Sumner entered business life at the age of 
eighteen. He began as messenger for the Hartford Trust Company 
and worked his way step by step to positions of increasing importance 
and responsibility. He is now secretary, treasurer, and trustee of that 
institution. His other business connections are directorships in the 
Pratt and Whitney Company, and the Gray Pay Telephone Station, 
and trustee-ship in the Mechanics Savings Bank, all of Hartford. 

In municipal and civic affairs Mr. Sumner has long been an 
influential and valuable factor. From 1888 to 1900 he served on the 
board of health. Since April, 1905, he has been a member of the 
city water board. He was a member of the Brown School district 
committee for many years and has devoted much time to problems 
of public education. He once served on the common council and 
has been active in the affairs of the Democratic party in Connecticut 
during his entire career. He has been jury commissioner in Hartford 
County ever since the enaction of the law establishing that office. 
In 1905 he served on the Connecticut-Massachusetts boundary com- 

857 



258 PRANK CHESTER SUMNER, 

mission. Since June, 1899, he has been a commissioner of the 
Connecticut River Bridge and Highway District, succeeding the late 
Hon. John H. Hall, president of the Colt Fire Arms Company. For 
the past twenty-five years he has worked zealously in various ways for 
improved conditions on the " East Side " of Hartford. Since 1893 he 
has been a director of the State Prison. 

Commissioner Sumner was an original member of the " Hubbard 
Escort." He is a member of the Hartford Club and the Hartford 
Golf Club. His home is at 609 Farmington Avenue. Mrs. Sumner 
was Mary L. Catlin, daughter of George S. Catlin. Their marriage 
took place on June 17th, 1896. 

Mrs. John W. Sumner who is spending the winter with her son, 
has just celebrated her ninety-sixth birthday. 




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LETSOME TERRELL WOOSTER 

WOOSTER, LETSOME TERRELL, late brass manufacturer, 
inventor and industrial leader, of Seymour, New Haven 
County, Connecticut, was, at the time of his recent death, 
the oldest and best known brass manufacturer in this country. He 
was born in Waterbury in 1830 and died in Seymour in 1908. His 
inventions revolutionized the brass industry and his processes for 
making German silver were equally important in that branch of metal- 
lurgy, but his renown is based on his service to his fellow-men, his 
noble character and his integrity and ability, as much as on these 
results of his brilliant inventions. 

In 1630, two hundred years and seven generations before his own 
birth, Mr. Wooster's ancestors came from England to Connecticut, 
where they became patriots, prominent in ecclesiastical, military, 
educational and political affairs. Six of these notable ancestors were 
commissioned officers in the Eevolution, while General David Wooster 
and Lieutenant Gideon Hotchkiss were famous officers in the French 
and Indian War. Another distinguished ancestor, the Rev. John 
Bowers, graduated from Harvard in the class of 1649, was the first 
instructor in classics in the school which grew into Yale University 
and, in 1872, was the first clergyman in Derby, Connecticut. 

Throughout his boyhood Letsome T. Wooster lived in his birth- 
place, Waterbury. Until he was twenty-two years old he expected to 
be a mechanical engineer and his first work in life was in that field 
of labor. In 1852 the president of the Waterbury Brass Company 
urged him to enter his company, and his life from that time on was 
devoted to the brass industry. 

Soon after he became identified with brass manufacturing, Mr. 
Wooster went to Torrington with the Hon. Lyman W. Coe and organ- 
ized the Coe Brass Manufacturing Company, of which he was manager 
for eight years. When the Seymour Manufacturing Company was 
organized in 1885 Mr. Wooster became its superintendent and active 
bead, which office he held up to the time of his death in 1908. This 
10 261 



262 



LETSOME TERRELL WOOSTER. 



large brass industry is the leading one of the community and one of 
the greatest in the United States, and gives Seymour its industrial 
prominence and its character as a town. Mr. Wooster's interest in 
the welfare and progress of his employees was keen and potent, and 
their resulting prosperity did much for the upbuilding of Seymour 
as a village of homes and thrifty industry. The fame and importance 
of the Seymour Manufacturing Company is world-wide and the brass 
and German silver products turned out there are in great demand. 
The success of the industry and the completeness of its enormous 
plant is chiefly due to the executive ability, high ideals as to labor 
and capital, and the valuable labor-saving inventions of Mr. Wooster. 
The unsurpassed capacity for business is made possible by the 
progressive methods which he inaugurated. 

Outside of the industrial world Mr. Wooster's influence was felt 
in many ways. He was greatly interested in education and religion 
and was a trustee of Wesleyan University. Though he shunned public 
offices he was public spirited in a very noble way and gave many useful 
services to his fellows. His charities were many and unostentatious 
and but one evidence of a truly Christian character. 

As an employer he was just, kindly, sympathetic and helpful. 
As an industrial leader he was capable, inventive, progressive, honor- 
able and powerful. As a man he was noble, truthful, thoughtful, 
conscientious and warm hearted. The influence of his busy and 
fruitful life abides in the great manufacturing business which owes 
its success to him. His ideal of citizenship and manliness abide in 
the influence of his personality and character. 

Letsome T. Wooster was survived by a wife, Julia A. Wooster, 
who died a few weeks later. There remain three daughters, Emma 
M., Mrs. Harlan W. Cooley, and L. Theresa, and four grandchildren, 
Julia and Wooster Canfield and Julia and Harlan Wooster Cooley. 
Mr. Wooster's brother, W. H. H. Wooster, is now secretary and 
treasurer of the Seymour Manufacturing Company. 




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AQUILA HILL CONDELL 

CONDELL, AQUILA HILL, treasurer and manager of the Elm 
City Brass and Rivet Company of Plainville, Hartford County, 
Connecticut, was born in Kemptville, Province of Ontario, 
Canada, on January 3d, 1849. He is the son of John Condell, 
inventor and manufacturer of artificial limbs, and of Catharine Hill 
Condell. His male ancestors on both the paternal and maternal sides 
were soldiers in the British Army in Ireland under William, Prince 
of Orange, and, at the close of the War, settled in Ireland. On the 
paternal side Mr. Condell's grandparents were William and Sarah 
West Condell, who settled in Montreal, Canada, in 1816. When 
John Condell, their son and A. H. Condell's father, was about a 
year old, William and Sarah moved the family to Leeds County, 
Ontario, which was John's home until after his marriage in 1846, 
when he moved to Kemptville. In 1857 John Condell located in 
Brockville, Ontario, and in 1863 in Morristown, New York. On the 
maternal side Mr. Condell's grandparents were Thomas and Elizabeth 
Blake Hill, who settled in Ontario, in 1818. 

The Victoria Central School in Brockville, Ontario, Canada, 
furnished Mr. Condell's early education. When he had completed 
his schooling he went to work as a cabinet maker in Brooklyn, 
New York. His marked mechanical bent made his progress rapid. 
Prom 1870 to 1878, Mr. Condell was manager of a carriage 
factory in Plainville, Connecticut. Prom 1879 to 1883 he was presi- 
dent of the Condell, Mastin and Butler Company, carriage makers of 
Plainville. Prom 1884 to 1901 he was superintendent of the E. W. 
Welch Manufacturing Company, clock makers of Forestville, 
Connecticut. Since 1903 he has been treasurer and manager of the 
Elm City Brass and Bivet Company of Plainville, a large concern 
manufacturing brass fire-place fixtures and ornamental metal work 
of a high grade. He is also vice-president of the First National 
Bank of Plainville, director of the Plainville Water Company, the 
Unionville Water Company and the New Britain General Hospital. 

265 



266 



AQUILA HILL OONDELL. 



Ever since he located in Plainville Mr. Condell has been one 
of the leaders of the Eepublican party in that community, having been 
chairman of the Eepublican Town Committee for twenty-five years. 
He represented Plainville in the State Legislature in 1884 and was 
a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1902. In his earlier 
days he preferred public service along military lines as a member of 
Company I, 47th Eegiment, New York National Guards. 

Mr. Condell is a thirty-second degree Mason and Past-Master 
of Frederick Lodge No. 14, A. F. and A. M., Plainville, a member of 
Washington Commandery, Knights Templar, of Sphinx Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, of the Knights of Pythias and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is a member of the Baptist Church. The 
outdoor sport which appeals to him as the best form of recreation 
is fishing. 

In 1872 Mr. Condell married Mary J. Gladding, who died in 
1890. In 1891 he married Ida J. Bristol. Two children have been 
born to Mr. Condell, one of whom is now living, a daughter, Minnie 
Elizabeth. The Condell home is at 34 Broad Street, Plainville. 



PHILIP LOUIS HOLZER. 

HOLZEB, PHILIP LOUIS, banker and insurance man, a 
member of the firm of James Staples & Company, of 
Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, is also well 
known for his prominent part in public affairs and as a State Senator. 
He was born in Bridgeport, on February 20th, 1854, the son of John 
and Catherine Andres Holzer. His father, a man of sterling integ- 
rity, was born and educated in Germany and was a lieutenant in the 
army of the Grand Duke of Baden at the time of the Eevolution of 
1848 and 1849. Upon the failure of this revolution he came to 
America as a refugee and learned the trade of metal spinning. He 
followed this trade the greater part of his life, becoming a foreman 
and a stockholder in the company in which he was employed. He 
served his adopted country as captain of Company B, First Begiment 
Connecticut Volunteers, in the Civil War. The mother was the 
daughter of John and Marie Elizabeth (Schmitt) Andres who came 
from Prussia to this country in 1845 and settled in Bridgeport, which 
was then but a village. They were among the first Germans to settle 
in Bridgeport. Through these maternal ancestors Mr. Holzer is also 
descended from French-Huguenot stock. His mother was a woman 
of strong character and high ideals which had a marked influence in 
shaping her son's standards and conduct. 

His actual schooling began at the age of six years, when he was 
sent to a private school where he remained until he was ten years 
old. He then entered the public schools, where he was graduated at 
the head of his class. Having determined upon a business career, he 
entered the Bryant & Stratton Business College and again was 
graduated with honors. Early in life he was impressed with the 
value of an education and he became an omnivorous reader of history, 
biography and good fiction. As he grew older he added books con- 
ducive to the formation of correct judgments and the development of 
his powers of expression. He read with particular zeal all books 
that bore upon his chosen vocation. This habit of reading and study 
he has continued throughout his life. 

369 



270 



PHILIP LOUIS HOLZEE. 



In 1868 Mr. Holzer began his business career as a clerk in the 
office of J. & G'. A. Staples, real estate and insurance agents, Bridge- 
port. A year and a half later, he left this firm to become assistant 
bookkeeper in the office of Crane & Hurd, wholesale grain dealers. 
In 1870 he entered the Connecticut National Bank of Bridgeport as 
bookkeeper and was soon promoted to teller and later advanced to the 
position of paying teller. 

Banking proved to be a most congenial business as well as one 
for which his training had well fitted him, and he remained in this 
bank until 1884 when he resigned to return to his first employer, 
James Staples, who took him into partnership with himself and son, 
forming the firm of James Staples & Company, bankers, real estate 
and insurance agents. 

As he had already received a thorough training in banking, Mr. 
Holzer now devoted himself to the mastery of the insurance branch 
of the business with such success that he became prominent in this 
line and was several times made president of the Bridgeport Fire 
Underwriters' Association, of which organization he has been almost 
continuously a committee member. He was one of the original organ- 
izers of the Connecticut State Association of Local Fire Insurance 
Agents, of which organization he is now vice-president. Besides 
being a member of the firm of James Staples & Co., which is one of 
the prominent banking and insurance houses of Bridgeport, Mr. 
Holzer is a director of the Holzer-Cabot Electric Company, of 
Brookline, Mass., director and treasurer of the Masonic Temple 
Association of Bridgeport, and a director of the Mountain Grove 
Cemetery Association of Bridgeport. 

Mr. Holzer is a member of Corinthian Lodge, No. 104, F. & 
A. M., Past Commander of Hamilton Commandery, No. 5, Knights 
Templar, a member of Lafayette Consistory, 32d degree Masons, and 
of Pyramid Temple, N. M. S. He is treasurer of Corinthian Lodge 
and of the Pyramid Temple Building Corporation, a member and 
ex-president of the Sea Side Club and a member of the Algonquin 
and Brooklawn Country Clubs and of Franklin Bartlett Camp, Sons 
of Veterans. He keenly enjoys out-door sports, particularly fishing 
and golf, and spends some time each season fishing in Maine or 
Canada. 

In politics Mr. Holzer is an ardent Republican and has many 



PHILIP LOUIS HOLZER. 271 

times been honored by his party. In April, 1896, he was elected a 
member of the Board of Aldermen, of Bridgeport, and the following 
April he was elected president of this Board. In 1898 he was ap- 
pointed a member of the city's Board of Fire Commissioners, and 
was elected its president the next year. In 1908 he was elected state 
senator from the Twenty-first District. For several years he has 
served on the Republican Town Committee of Bridgeport. Mr. Holzer 
believes that every American should take some part in politics. When 
asked to suggest some essential qualification for a successful career, 
he said, " The world needs more trained men in every calling and 
occupation. I would say to the young man, ' Decide on your vocation- 
Fit yourself for it so you will stand above the average. Then fill your 
position to the best of your ability.' " 

Mr. Holzer in 1878 married Sara M., daughter of John Glover and 
Margaret Porter Smith, of old New England lineage. He and his 
wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal Church. Their home 
is on Iranistan Avenue, Bridgeport. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON TRAUT. 

TiEAUT, GEOEGB WASHINGTON, president and treasurer 
of the Traut & Hines Manufacturing Company, of New 
Britain, was born in that city on February 22d, 1869, the son 
of Justus A. Traut, the well-known inventor and manufacturer, and 
Louisa B. Traut. Justis A. Traut is also known for his activity in 
civic affairs, as a former member of the New Britain Common Council, 
and school board, and as president of the New Britain General 
Hospital. A sketch of his life is given in Volume II of this work. 
The first of the family to locate in the United States was Frederick 
A. Traut who came from Germany in 1845. 

New Britain was George Washington Traut's home throughout 
his boyhood and he acquired his education in the public and high 
schools of New Britain. He inherited his father's bent for mechanics 
and manufacturing and lost no time in entering that line of work. 

In 1888, when his father established the Traut & Hines Manu- 
facturing Company, he began his career as a manufacturer as treas- 
urer of the company. He was treasurer and manager from 1888 to 
1909, since when he has been president and treasurer. He is a director 
of the Savings Bank of New Britain, of the New Britain National 
Bank and of the New Britain General Hospital. 

Mr. Traut has served two terms as a member of the New Britain 
Common Council and is now serving his second term on the city 
school board. He is a Republican in his political allegiance. 

He is a Congregationalist in creed, being a member of the South 
Congregational Church of New Britain. He has many fraternal ties, 
being a member of Harmony Lodge, Giddings Chapter and Doric 
Council of New Britain, and of Washington Commandery, and 
Sphinx Temple, of Hartford. He is a member of the New Britain 
Club, the Hartford Club, and the Farmington Country Club. 

On the first day of May, 1895, George W. Traut was married 
to Amalie A. B. Sternberg. Five children have been born of this 

272 



GEORGE WASHINGTON TRAUT. 275 

marriage. One son, Justus A., Jr., died in infancy. The four now 
living are Elisabeth, Prancesca I., Amalie L., and Anna C. 

The family home is at Traut Lodge, New Britain. 

The attributes that should be cultivated by those who seek true 
success in life and its work are summed up by Mr. Traut with char- 
acteristic high-mindedness and common sense. They are, he says : 
" Absolute honesty and faithfulness, perseverance in business affairs 
and fair treatment to every one." 



WILFRED HOPKINS NETTLETON. 

NETTLETON, WILFRED HOPKINS, retired manufacturer, 
of Bristol, inventor and promoter, was born in Waterbury, 
June 2, 1825. His parents were Garry and Mary Nettleton. 
He had two sisters, and one brother, all now deceased. His father was 
a farmer and a man highly respected. His most marked characteristics 
were a sincere Christian spirit and high moral principles. He was 
a participant in the War of 1812. 

When Wilfred Hopkins Nettleton was about twelve years old, 
the family moved from Waterbury to Bristol, Connecticut, where 
he received his education and where his whole business life has 
centered. His most influential teacher was Mr. Simeon Norton, 
one of the most successful district schoolmasters of the time. Another 
interesting fact that greatly affected Mr. Nettleton's career was the 
marriage of his aunt, Miss Laura Nettleton, to Mr. Asa Hopkins, 
from whom Mr. Nettleton got his middle name and his interest in 
the clock industry. Mr. Hopkins was an inventor and manufacturer 
of the old-fashioned wooden wheel clocks. Through the theft of his 
inventions, before they were patented, he was deprived of fame and 
fortune that were his due. 

After finishing his education in the Bristol schools Mr. Nettleton 
entered the employ of Brewster and Ingraham, clock manufacturers, 
with whom he remained a year. When he reached the age of twenty 
he became a contractor, employing a number of men. He had a marked 
genius for making certain parts of clocks and his great ambition 
was to become a manufacturer. In connection with Mr. Charles 
Raymond, his machinist, he perfected automatic machines for which 
he secured patents in this country, but unfortunately not in Europe, 
where they have been found valuable enough to be copied and are 
still in wide use both in Europe and in this country. By the use 
of these valuable labor-saving devices Mr. Nettleton was able to 
supply all the large clockmakers of this country with those special 

276 





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1 ^ A ^ 




0^^^^ 



WILFRED HOPKINS NETTLETON. 279 

parts of clock movements for about five thousand clocks daily. 
During the quarter of a century of his active career as manufacturer 
he also manufactured hemmers and binders for sewing-machines, 
machine screws, washers, brass bells and ladies' fans, employing from 
forty to fifty workmen. 

The Ten-Dollar Sewing-Machine, invented and patented by 
W. H. Nettleton and Charles Eaymond, was the first practical low 
priced sewing machine in this country. Mr. Nettleton and Mr. 
Eaymond first started the manufacturing of sewing-machines in 
Brattleboro, Vermont, where the business was conducted with success 
for two or three years. Later on the business was removed to 
Guelph, Ontario, where the business is now conducted extensively 
by a joint stock company. The machines are mostly shipped to 
Europe. 

After this venture became an established success he sold out 
his half interest in it to Mr. Eaymond rather than to leave Bristol. 
He remained in the manufacturing business until 1871, when failing 
health induced him to sell out to George A. Jones. Since that time 
Mr. Nettleton has devoted his time to his many private business 
interests and to public affairs in his community. He was president 
of the Bristol Saw Company for twelve years, a director of the 
National Water Wheel Company and president of the American Coal 
Barge Company of New Haven for a number of years. He is the 
only surviving original director of the Bristol National Bank which 
was established in 1875. 

Such has been Mr. Nettleton's strenuous and successful business 
career in bare outline. It is worthy of study not only for the value 
of his work as an industrial leader and inventor but chiefly because 
it is a striking example of a successful life started humbly and 
independent of any financial backing, harassed by many difficulties 
that would have dismayed a less steadfast courage and resourceftilness. 
This ability to cope with critical situations was not the outgrowth 
of long experience but was evinced early in his career at the time 
of the financial panic in 1855 and the two subsequent years when so 
many clock manufacturers failed. By a characteristic stroke of 
genius he devised a plan of taking finished clocks and exchanging 
the same with merchants and manufacturers for their goods whereby 
he was able to manipulate them into cash or its equivalent. Thus 



280 WILFEED HOPKINS NETTI*ETON. 

by the wise expedient of taking clocks instead of notes he avoided 
bankruptcy which was the lot of so many of his customers. 

Mr. Nettleton's public services have been as notable as his busi- 
ness achievements. Since his first vote he has been loyal to the 
Eepublican party in politics and for several years he was a member 
of the Eepublican League of New Haven. In 1866 he was the 
nominee of his party in Bristol for the office of state representative. 
At the time of the Civil War he was debarred from active military 
service on account of ill health but he was intensely loyal and 
through his generosity encouraged several of his employees to enlist. 

His only brother died after the awful imprisonment at Ander- 
sonville. After the terrible battle of Antietam Mr. Nettleton hurried 
to the battlefield and passed through many eventful experiences in 
his efforts to relieve suffering. He was a zealous member of the 
committee of Bristol citizens who brought about the erection of a 
monument to the heroes of the war. 

In 1871 Mr. ISTettleton became a member of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Bristol and he has been devoted to the welfare of 
that church ever since. He has served on many important committees 
in the church. 

Music, travel and social life have always been Mr. Nettleton's 
chief interests outside of business, public and home ties. For the 
past twenty years he has spent much of his time traveling, spending 
his winters in California, Florida or some of the neighboring English 
islands. His gentle dignity, kindly generosity, cordial manner and 
keen mind attract many friends and have always made him popular 
with his employees. His remarkably well preserved vigor and 
youthful energy make him pass for a man twenty years younger than 
he is, and his splendid vitality enables him to travel thousands of 
miles unattended. His fraternal ties are with the Masons and the 
Bristol Social Club. 

On June 9th, 1847, Mr. Nettleton married Miss Harriet Newell 
Tuttle of Bristol, a lady of rare culture and intellect, beloved by all 
who knew her. She died in May, 1896, one year before their fiftieth 
anniversary. 




a. z 




ARTHUR IRVING JACOBS. 

JACOBS, ARTHUR IRVING, one of Hartford's most successful 
inventors and manufacturers, is the president and treasurer of 
The Jacobs Manufacturing Company, its chief product being 
his famous invention, the " Jacobs Improved Drill Chuck." He was 
born in Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut, on August 13th, 1858, 
one of the eight children of Zalmon Luman and Mary Elizabeth Bab- 
cock Jacobs. He is descended from Nicholas Jacobs, who came 
from Hanover, County of Suffolk, England, to Hingham, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1638. The immediate descendants of Nicholas Jacobs 
settled in Windham County, Connecticut, and founded one of the 
oldest families in the state. Zalmon Jacobs, Mr. Jacobs' father, was 
a man of powerful intellect and an inventive genius far ahead of his 
time. In his early life he was a teacher and his rare ability as a 
mathematician was a matter of local fame and wonderment. His 
inventions of over a half century ago included a screw plate, an 
automatic water feed for steam boilers, a bee hive and the machinery 
for making it, a printing press for printing many colors at one opera- 
tion, and an original system of phonography. Whatever need came 
up in his life, he sought and solved that need in his own inventions. 
When ill health made him need medicine he invented " Dr. Jacobs' 
Vegetable Pill," for the manufacture of which he built a medical 
laboratory in Hebron, and all the necessary machinery for making 
these pills, boxes, labels, etc., for this enterprise was of his own 
invention and making. 

It was in the shop connected with this laboratory that his son, 
Arthur Jacobs, did his first work in life and fostered his strongly 
inherited genius for mechanical invention. There he learned the 
use of all sorts of tools while in his early teens. He also earned 
money by picking and selling berries when he was a very small boy. 
The day he was eight years old be picked eight quarts of huckleberries. 

Arthur Jacobs' education was very limited, as he did not attend 
school after his ninth year except for a short time in midwinter. His 



284 



ARTHUR IRVING JACOBS. 



mechanical skill was first guided into definite channels by his friend 
and adviser, the Eev. George S. Dodge, the pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Hebron, who afterwards moved to Rutland, Massa- 
chusetts. In 1880, he introduced young Mr. Jacobs to a loom 
manufacturer in Worcester, with whom he secured employment. In 
less than three weeks he was advanced and so greatly did he improve 
the methods in his department that the work was done with far 
greater economy and efficiency. He remained with this concern, the 
Knowles Loom Works, until 1887, and during that time he invented 
a book sewing machine and sold several such machines of his own 
making. The Smyth Manufacturing Company of Hartford were so 
impressed with the value of this machine that they purchased the 
patent and engaged Mr. Jacobs to come to Hartford and assist them 
in its perfection in their factory. 

From March 1st, 1887, to December 1st, 1901, Mr. Jacobs 
remained in the employ of the Smyth Manufacturing Company. 
This period was a most important one in his career, for he learned 
business methods of the most progressive and honorable type and 
had an opportunity to invent and perfect a number of valuable 
machines. The most important of these was his machine for making 
book covers with a great economy of labor and expense. This machine 
sold for four thousand dollars and hundreds were manufactured by 
The Smyth Company. Mr. Jacobs assigned many patents to The 
Smyth Manufacturing Company while in their employ. 

Mr. Jacobs resigned in 1901 with the intention of devoting his 
time to the perfection of a more complete book sewing machine, but 
he was obliged to postpone this undertaking for three years because 
of the nature of his contract with The Smyth Company, in which he 
had agreed to assign to them during the life of his original book 
sewing machine patent, all patents in book sewing machines which 
he might invent, and the original patent still had three years to run. 
He then resolved to spend this period of forced suspension of his 
cherished plans in other lines of invention and soon invented the 
Jacobs Improved Drill Chuck. His patent on this chuck was allowed 
on September 16th, 1902, and as he was not successful in getting 
anyone to manufacture his chuck, he designed and made special tools 
for that purpose, and began the manufacture of chucks at the factory 
of The Pope Manufacturing Company. The Jacobs Improved Drill 



ARTHUR IRVING JACOBS. 286 

Chuck was no sooner put on the market than its superior merit was 
recognized by mechanics and it met with a ready and extensive sale 
in 1903. 

On October 30th, 1903, The Jacobs Manufacturing Company of 
Hartford was incorporated under the laws of the State of Connecticut. 
At first the stockholders were partly outsiders, but now the entire 
stock is owned in Mr. Jacobs' family. Although the chuck patent 
seemed insignificant in value in comparison with many of his former 
patents, it has been of greater profit to Mr. Jacobs than all his other 
fifty patents. The Jacobs Drill Chuck has a world-wide fame and 
use. Mr. Jacobs is president and treasurer of The Jacobs Manu- 
facturing Company, his son Raymond is secretary, and each of his 
children director. Mr. Jacobs is also president and chief owner of 
the Nuevo Mahogany Company and is an officer and stockholder 
in a number of other corporations. 

On October 19th, 1880, Mr. Jacobs married Lucy Ann Backus 
of Hebron, who died in 1908. She was a great help to him in his 
early struggle to get ahead, and enjoyed the reward of their mutual 
efforts for success. Their three children are May Louise, a graduate 
of Wellesley College, Clara Bell, who attended Smith College and 
is the wife of Louis E. Stoner of the City Bank of Hartford, and a 
son, Raymond Backus, who is secretary of The Jacobs Manufacturing 
Company. 

Mr. Jacobs advises young men to be thinkers. He believes that 
" the royal road to success is obtained by good, hard, honest work 
with lots of planning as to how best to accomplish a desired end." 
He is himself a hard worker and attends closely to business with a 
concentration of purpose that cannot fail of success. 



JOHN A. CRILLY. 

CHILLY, JOHN A., adjuster for the Hartford Street Railway 
Company, former county commissioner, alderman, present 
member of the common council, and a politician of local note 
and influence, is one of the well and favorably known men and char- 
acters of the Capitol City, in which he has figured conspicuously for 
more than a third of a century. 

Mr. Crilly was born April 22d, 1847, in Pike Eiver, Canada, son 
of William and Martha (McCormick) Crilly, natives of Ireland, the 
father born January 18th, 1805, and the mother March 8th, 1807. 
They were married in Ireland, and in 1836 came to Canada, locating 
in Pike Eiver, where he was occupied through life as wheelwright and 
bridge builder. 

He was one of the pioneer contractors on the Central Vermont 
Eailroad and was interested in the construction of man}^ of the origi- 
nal bridges and much of the road in the north. The Albaugh bridge at 
Lake Champlain, and a large bridge south of Montreal, were among 
his contracts. 

Both of Mr. Crilly's parents were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. His father died January 9th, 1887, and Lis 
mother on July 17th, 1886. Their children were as follows : 
Thomas, born May 8th, 1836; Mary, born July 29th, 1838, who 
married Allen Hageboom, of Canada; William, born July 18th, 
1840 ; Sarah J., born August 12th, 1842, who married Henry Spears, 
of Pike Eiver; James, born October 3d, 1844; John A. and Martha, 
twins, born April 22d, 1847; and Eobert, born June 6th, 1849, who 
died December 10th, 1852. 

John A. Crilly passed his boyhood in the place of his birth, 
remaining at home until about fifteen years of age, and attending the 
common schools of the place. After this for a time he was employed 
at farm work, and when fourteen years of age, in 1861, he came to 
Hartford, in which city he in 1865 became employed in the black- 
smith shop of the Hartford Street Eailway Company. At that time 

286 




WKMHBmm 




JOHN A. CEILLY. 289 

horses were used as motive power. Shortly after entering the services 
of this Company, Mr. Crilly became foreman of the stables, and had 
charge of the outgoing and incoming teams, and also the care of the 
yard. Later, his ability in various lines was recognized, and he be- 
came acting superintendent, and materially aided President Goodrich 
in much of the company's general business. He had the employing 
and discharging of men, and matters pertaining to their affairs. At 
the time of the change from horsepower to electricity, Mr. Crilly was 
entrusted with the sale of the horses. He continued in the position 
of acting superintendent until 1895, by which time the road had so 
enlarged that the office of adjuster was created, and through Mr. 
Crilly's acquaintance and thorough knowledge of the business affairs 
of the company he was made that officer. He has the adjusting of 
all claims for damages against the company, a position requiring a 
peculiar fitness, which Mr. Crilly seems to possess, as he has suc- 
ceeded admirably in all matters of the kind which have come to issue 
since the creation of the office. With but few exceptions he has settled 
all claims made, and in each of these exceptions a verdict has been 
obtained for the company ; in this he has no doubt saved the company 
much money, and his adjudication of these claims has always been 
most satisfactory to all parties concerned. 

Mr. Crilly's political affiliations have been with the Kepublican 
party, and in its councils he has figured not a little. Genial, sociable 
and possessed of tact, he is popular, and a good mixer with men — a 
make-up of that kind makes a good political leader. He has long been 
before the public, his fellow citizens of Hartford having frequently 
elected him to offices of trust, honor, and responsibility, and as often 
has he discharged the duties of the same in a manner most satisfactory 
to them and to his own credit. He has served six years continuously 
in the common council of Hartford, to which he was re-elected in 
1900, and eight years as a member of the board of aldermen, and at 
this time is the oldest member in point of service. With one exception 
Mr. Crilly has served longer in that body or as alderman than any 
other man now living in the city, serving under Mayors Joseph 
Sprague, (Gov.) Bulkeley, (Gen.) Dwight, John G. Boot, and 
Alexander Harbison. He was three years a selectman, a position he 
resigned to take that of county commissioner, which office he held 
for two years. For twenty years Mr. Crilly has been chairman of the 
11 



290 JOHN A. OEILLY. 

Fourth Ward Republican Committee, and he has also served oc- 
casionally on the ward and the town committees. 

Socially, too, Mr. Crilly is prominent and influential, being a 
member of St. John's Lodge, F. & A. M., Pythagoras Chapter, Woleott 
Council, Washington Commandery, No. 1, K. T., Sphinx Temple, 
Mystic Shrine, Hartford Lodge, No. 82, I. 0. 0. P., in which he has 
passed all the chairs and is past noble grand; Midian Encampment, 
in which he has held a number of official positions; the Knights of 
Pythias, the B. P. 0. E., the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and 
B. H. Webb Council, No. 702, Eoyal Arcanum. He is also a member 
of Putnam Phalanx. Mr. Crilly was one of three who took medals 
for twenty-five years of continuous service in the Odd Fellows 
fraternity. 

On May 22d, 1879, Mr. Crilly was married to Louisa A., daughter 
of Captain John and Antoinette (Goodrich) Smith, and the union 
has been blessed with children as follows: John A., Jr., born June 
13, 1885; Martha A., who died when ten months old; and Mabel 
Smith, who died when eight months old. 

On November 7th, 1906, John A. Crilly, Jr., was united in 
marriage with Eleanor Stephen, daughter of Charles Aberdeen and 
Amy (Cook) Stephen, of Dunham, Province of Quebec, Canada. 

Captain John Smith was a farmer and interested in navigation 
between Hartford and New York, and owned several schooners carry- 
ing coal. 

He was a descendant of Samuel Smith who, in 1634, migrated 
from Ipswich, England, to Connecticut and settled in Wethersfield. 
The fact is, this particular Smith may be said to have made the 
"Mother of Connecticut." 

John Smith's grandfather planted the well-known old and largest 
elm in Connecticut, which is still standing in Wethersfield. 

Captain John Smith had a family of three children : William E., 
Louisa A., and Isabella, who married Captain Sanford A. Griswold, 
of Hartford. The father and mother are now deceased, she having 
lived to be sixty-nine years old. William Smith, the grandfather of 
Mrs. Crilly, was a native of Wethersfield, born March 17th, 1782, son 
of James and Sarah (Hanmer) Smith. William Smith married 
Hulda Woodhouse, daughter of Samuel Woodhouse, a Revolutionary 
soldier; her mother drew a pension. 










v - : : v >: v ': : :- 



C-^C^a-^t 



a 



SILAS WEBSTER ROBBINS. 

ROBBINS, SILAS WEBSTER, one of the oldest and most 
prominent citizens of the historic town of Wethersfield, is 
known for his great part in the political, agricultural, and 
business life of the community in which his ancestors have been 
important factors for so many generations. He has served his town 
as treasurer, postmaster, and the promoter of industry and traffic 
and his state as senator, but he is best known for his success as a 
stock-breeder and as the pioneer importer of Jersey cattle in this 
part of the country. He was born in Wethersfield on October 2d, 
1822. His father was Richard Robbins, a leading merchant in 
Wethersfield, and his mother was Chloe Robbins. The Robbina 
family is an old English family and was found in Hedengworth, 
Leicestershire, England, before 1600. John Robbins, who died in 
1680, was buried there in accordance with an act of Parliament 
and was probably a Dissenter. The records are incomplete owing 
to the burning of the parish church in 1600. John Robbins, Gentle- 
man, one of the four sons of this first John and his wife Hester, came 
to America previous to 1638, in which year he had a conveyance of 
land in Wethersfield. He was a selectman. He married a sister of 
Governor Welles. Another early ancestor, Jacob Robbins, his grand- 
father on his mother's side, married a cousin of Noah Webster, the 
lexicographer. The line of descent was: Gentleman John, Joshua, 
Nathaniel, Richard, Elijah, Richard, and Silas W. 

After receiving a good education at the Rev. Joseph Emerson's 
well known school, Silas Robbins entered business life as a clerk in 
a store in Hartford in 1839, being then seventeen years old. In 
1843, before he reached his majority, he became a member of the 
firm of B. N. Strong and Company, predecessors of Johnson, Robbins 
and Company, Seedsmen, of which important Wethersfield industry 
he was president for about twenty years. He was treasurer and 
director of the Wethersfield Novelty Company for twenty-five years. 
Fifty-one years ago he became a director of the American National 

293 



294 



SILAS WEBSTER BOBBINS. 



Bank of Hartford and he still acts in that capacity. For many- 
years he has been a trustee of the Mechanics Savings Bank of 
Hartford and a director of the Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of Hartford. He has also been a director in the Merrick 
Thread Company of Holyoke, Massachusetts, for many years. He 
was one of the original incorporators of the Connecticut Valley 
Eailroad and a charter member of the Hartford and Wethersfield 
Street Railway Company in 1862, of which company he is now the 
only living member. 

First as a Whig and later as a Eepublican, Mr. Bobbins has 
been an important figure in public affairs. In 1861 he became post- 
master of Wethersfield and held this office for ten years. In 1889 
he was elected state senator. He was town clerk for two years. 

In 1859 Mr. Bobbins started the breeding of Jersey cattle in 
this country and soon afterwards founded the American Jersey 
Cattle Club. Stock-breeding became a positive passion with Mr. 
Bobbins, and he imported his stock from the Island of Jersey at 
great expense. His large herds of cattle were famed for their beauty, 
their fine breeding and milking capacity, and their fame extended 
throughout our land. Outside of this registered stock farming Mr. 
Bobbins became greatly interested in raising English pheasants and 
flowers, with both of which he has had famous success. 

On February 14th, 1854, Mr. Bobbins married Sophia Jane 
Johnson. One of their four children, Elisha Johnson, died. The 
others are Julia Finley, Catherine Chester, and Anne Cushman, now 
Mrs. Wilford W. Savage. 

Mr. Bobbins has been a member of the Congregational Church 
for about seventy years. 



CHARLES MASON BEACH. 

BEACH, CHAELES MASON", late partner in the firm of 
Beach & Company, woolen manufacturer, dairy farmer, and 
in many other ways one of the leading business men of the 
State, was a resident of West Hartford. He was born in Hartford 
on February 18th, 1826, one of the eight sons of George and Harriot 
Bradley Beach, and died in his home at West Hartford, on June 27th, 
1910. In his early days his father, George Beach, was a merchant 
engaged in trade with the West Indies, and during the latter half 
of his career he was one of Hartford's leading bankers, being presi- 
dent of the Phoenix National Bank of Hartford until his death in 
1860. Harriot Bradley Beach was the daughter of Aaron and Sarah 
( Chittenden) Bradley of Guilford and Hartford. She died when her 
son, Charles Mason, was an infant of five months. 

All Mr. Beach's ancestors were of English stock, and came 
to this country in the early part of the seventeenth century. Thomas 
Beach settled in New Haven in 1647, and moved to Milford in 1657. 
Another early ancestor was William Bradford, the famous governor 
of Plymouth Colony for thirty-one years. Other notable ancestors 
were John Webster, first governor of Connecticut in 1656 ; John Steele, 
first secretary of Connecticut in 1636 ; Major William Whiting, treas- 
urer of Connecticut 1641-7; Andrew Ward, one of the five Commis- 
sioners who governed Connecticut in 1635; Captain Joseph Weld of 
Boxbury, Massachusetts, a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company of Boston; Bichard Treate, a patentee, in the 
Boyal Charter of Connecticut in 1662; Captain Nicholas Olmsted, 
who served in King Philip's War ; Biehard Seymour and George Steele 
of Hartford, who served in the Pequot War, and Joseph Loomis of 
Windsor. Ten of Mr. Beach's ancestors were among the original 
settlers of Hartford. 

At the early age of three years Charles M. Beach began his 
education in the Hartford schools. He first attended private schools, 
Miss Canfield's on Church Street, and Miss Emmon's on Pratt Street. 

297 



298 



CHARLES MASON BEACH. 



Later he studied at Dr. Epaphroditus Hudson's School in Torring- 
ford. When he was twelve years old he went to Dr. Stephen Reed's 
Boarding School in Richmond, Massachusetts. He did not go to 
college, because his father realized that the classical education then 
afforded by the higher educational institutions would not be so 
valuable as an early start in business to a young man with strong 
interests in mercantile pursuits and applied science, and young Beach 
was content to derive his "higher education" from broad reading 
and private study, both of scientific works and of general literature. 

At the age of fourteen, that is in 1841, Charles Beach began his 
business career as a clerk in the office of Howe, Mather & Company, 
afterwards Mather, Morgan & Company, Asylum Street, Hartford. 
Eight years later he left that concern and entered into partnership 
with his older brothers, George and J. Watson Beach, in the firm of 
Beach & Company, dry salters and commission merchants, now im- 
porters and dealers in aniline dyes and other chemicals at 209 State 
Street, Hartford. 

On October 8th, 1849, Mr. Beach married Frances Lyman 
Belknap, who died in 1902. Seven children were born of this 
marriage, six of whom are now living, a daughter, Emily, having 
died in infancy; Harriot Bradley, now Mrs. William Whetton Hunt- 
ington, Frances Antoinette, Thomas Belknap, who married Mary 
Mansfield, Edith, Mary Elizabeth, and Charles Edward. He has 
left also two grandsons, Charles Frederic and Thomas Coffing Beach, 
sons of Charles Edward and Catherine Harriet (Coffing) Beach. 

Early in his business life Mr. Beach became identified, as 
founder, officer or director, with many of Hartford's leading business 
institutions, and he maintained many of these important connec- 
tions up to the time of his death. He was a director in the Phoenix 
Insurance Company for over fifty years. He was a director in the 
following: The Phcenix National Bank, the Connecticut Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, the Hartford Carpet Corporation, the 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company, of which 
he was one of the founders, the Holyoke Water Power Company, the 
Hartford Machine Screw Company, and the Illinois Central Railroad. 
He was a trustee of the Hartford Retreat for the Insane, the Watkin- 
son Farm' School, the St. Margaret's Diocesan School for Girls, and 
the Society of Donations and Bequests. He was the first treasurer of 



CHARLES MASON BEACH. 299 

the Society for the Increase of the Ministry. Mr. Beach was perhaps 
best known for his important part in the industrial life of the State, 
being one of the foremost woolen and worsted manufacturers, and 
until 1910, treasurer of the Broad Brook Company, whose extensive 
woolen mills axe widely known. 

For many years Mr. Beach was actively interested in hygenie 
dairy farming and devoted much thought to the production of 
the highest grade butter and perfectly sanitary or " clinical milk." 
He found in these and other branches of agriculture not only a 
way of enjoying outdoor life and perserving his own unusually robust 
health, but also a source of benefit to his fellow men. Mr. Beach be- 
lieved that the true prosperity of the country can only be realized when 
the best men of the State interest themselves in the improvement of 
the soil and all its natural products. For the attainment of this 
worthy end he thought that young men should own land and be respon- 
sible for its improvement, especially when they live in the country. 
His own agricultural interests included raising live-stock, for he was 
not only a wool grower but a cattle breeder. With Mr. Taintor of 
Hartford he was one of the first importers of Jerseys into this country. 
Mr. Beach always avoided political office. He never saw military 
service, as at the time of the Civil War defective eyesight debarred 
him from enlisting. He served the public in many other ways, in 
effective letters in the daily press in regard to manufacturing ques- 
tions, the lower tariff on raw materials and improved dairy methods. 
Although he voted the Democratic ticket, he chose the other when 
by so doing he was true to his principle to support the best men and 
the right issues, rather than to identify himself with any political 
party. 

He was a communicant of the Episcopal Church and, in the 
course of his long life, a member of the following parishes : Christ 
Church, St. John's, and the Church of the Good Shepherd in 
Hartford, and, since 1870, St. James's in West Hartford, of which 
last he was many years senior warden. He was a member of several 
leading social organizations, including the Hartford Club and the 
Hartford Golf Club. He was a founder of the American Jersey 
Cattle Club and the American Guernsey Cattle Club, and was a 
member of the London Society of Arts. His greatest pleasure was in 
his country home, in driving through rural roads and in improving 



300 CHAELES MASON BEACH. 

the splendid equipment of his farm'. He took great pride in Ids 
model barns, his fine Welsh sheep, his registered cattle and his sani- 
tary dairy and its pure products. 

Mr. Beach's life was remarkable for its achievements and its 
worthiness. Three generations knew him as a noble citizen, an honest 
and progressive business man, a true gentleman, and a strong char- 
acter. In the words of his close associate, Mr. John M. Taylor, 
president of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
writing to Mr. Beach's family, " jSTo man was governed by a higher 
sense of duty to the interests he represented, and none was more 
faithful to the trust committed to him by members of this company 
in his long service of thirty-one years. There remains to you and to 
all of us the tender memory of a sincere, loyal, and faithful man in 
all the manifold relations of his life. 

" Charles Mason Beach stood for the best, in business, in public- 
spirited citizenship, in loyalty to his many friends, in the true courtesy 
of ' a gentleman of the old school,' in his generous, well directed 
charities, and in his earnest and consistent Christianity. His fine 
appearance and attractive manner were but the outward expression 
of the inner grace, integrity, and fineness. His success came from 
industry and trustworthiness, and his popularity from unselfishness 
and tactful sympathy. The great fruits of his labors and the influence 
of his strong character abide." 



GARDINER HALL, JR. 

HALL, GARDINER, JR., founder, manager, and owner of the 
large and well known spool thread industry styled Gardiner 
Hall, Jr., & Company of South Wellington, Tolland County, 
Connecticut, is one of Connecticut's foremost manufacturers and 
inventors, and a worthy representative of an old and useful New 
England family whose part in the industrial and public life of their 
community has been great and influential. The Hall ancestry dates 
back to 1630 when John Hall came from Coventry, Warwickshire, 
England, to Charlestown, Massachusetts, in Governor Winthrop's 
band. John Hall was made a freeman in 1634, he was selectman at 
one time and very prominent in the Congregational Church. His 
sons, twelve in number, were all leaders in local affairs, one son, 
Benjamin, being a soldier in the Narragansett expedition. Since 
1830 the Halls have been strong factors in the history of manu- 
facturing in this State and in 1840 Origen Hall started the old 
Willington Thread Company, only a decade after Coats first manu- 
factured thread in Europe. Gardiner Hall, Senior, father of the 
present Gardiner Hall, Jr., was also a thread manufacturer and was 
the superintendent of the Old Willimantic Linen Company for seven 
years, from 1857 to 1864. He was a man of unusual mechanical 
genius, sterling honor, and active public spirit, a strong temperance 
advocate and a devoted Baptist. He was county commissioner, state 
representative, and the public servant in many philanthropic and 
charitable acts. His wife, the mother of Gardiner Hall, Jr., was 
Zeviah Emeline Essex of Colchester, Connecticut. Their son, Gar- 
diner Hall, Jr., was born in Newport, Biiode Island, on July 14, 1837. 
In early infancy Gardiner Hall, Jr., left Newport, as his parents 
removed to Willimantic, where they remained until he was five years 
old. Then, in 1842, they moved to Stafford, where they lived until 
1847, moving thence to Rockville, where Gardiner Hall, Sr., was 
occupied in running a mill. In 1848 the family settled in South 
Willington, which has been the home of Gardiner Hall, Jr., ever 

303 



304 GABDINEB HALL, JE. 

since, with the exception of one year. He was eleven years of age 
when his family located in South Willington, but even before that 
he had begun to learn the details of the thread industry by working 
in his father's mill outside of school hours. His education was simply 
tbat afforded by the district schools, but his practical experience in 
the line of manufacturing to which he was to give his life was 
thorough and complete, leading to a full mastery of the thread in- 
dustry by the time he reached manhood. 

In 1860 Gardiner Hall, Jr., started for himself in the thread 
manufacturing business in the partnership of Hall and Manning, in 
South Willington. They undertook to manufacture cotton thread on 
a small, experimental scale and met with immediate success. Just 
as the business was well started the Civil War broke out and in 
February, 1861, they were forced to shut down and Mr. Manning went 
to war. Mr. Hall then went to Willimantie and worked for the 
Willimantic Linen Company of which his father was superintendent. 
He remained in Willimantie from November, 1861, to June 10, 
1862, which was the only period of time that his business interests 
were not centered in South Willington. Upon his return to South 
Willington in the summer of 1862 Mr. Hall founded a new thread 
concern which was the nucleus of the present large company. He 
began thread manufacturing in a most independent way, having full 
charge and responsibility of all parts of the work, running his own 
boiler at first, and later, the bleach house. He was entirely alone 
in the business for two years until, on April 12, 1864, he took his 
two brothers-in-law into the business, Marcus M. Johnson and John 
E. Champlin. In 1868 Mr. Johnson disposed of his interest in the 
business to Mr. Hall's father, who had in the meantime given up 
his position as superintendent of the Willimantic mills, making the 
unusual circumstance of a son taking his father into his business. 
Mr. Champlin remained in the business until his death in 1896. 
Meanwhile, in November, 1879, Mr. Hall's father had died. Mr. 
Hall and Mr. Champlin had bought out the heirs, so that after Mr. 
Champlin's death in 1896 Mr. Hall was again alone in the business. 
Since his father's death thirty-one years ago Mr. Hall has had full 
management of the industry, which has had a remarkable record for 
uninterrupted prosperity in spite of many catastrophes and even in 
times of general panic. In one year, 1869, the concern pulled through 



GARDINER HALL, JR. 305 

three disasters, the burning of one of the mills, a damaging freshet, 
and the failure of the commission house through which they were 
selling their goods. But in spite of fire, freshet, and failures, the 
factory continued to run and to keep absolutely free from debt. The 
company has been running without any stop since 1862 ; there has never 
been a strike and never the need of resorting to any deviation from 
a strictly cash business basis or of putting any salesmen on the road 
to dispose of goods. From 1862 to 1869 Mr. Hall sold his thread 
through commission houses, but after the failure of one in 1869 he 
hired an office in New York. A year later he took a floor in the large 
building at 59 Walker Street, New York, which has been the city 
home of Gardiner Hall, Jr., and Company for the past thirty-nine 
years. This five story building is now entirely owned by the company 
and has recently been improved until it is the best equipped on the 
street. 

When Mr. Hall started to make thread in 1860 he employed six 
hands, turned out about eight hundred dozen spools a week and did 
his own bleaching, etc. Now the output is over thirty-six million 
spools a year, over one hundred and fifty hands are employed and 
plans are on foot for a still greater enlargement of the equipment. 
In spite of this rapid growth Mr. Hall has ever been actuated by the 
motto " Quality First " and has preferred quality to quantity in every- 
thing he has undertaken. He believes that if a thing is worth doing, 
it is worth doing well. He has always made it a point not to buy 
what he could not pay for, or sell what he did not have, and he has 
never given a note to any man. He thinks a man should take his 
bread unbuffered unless there is cash to pay for the butter. 

The great success of Mr. Hall's business has been due not only 
to his singleness of interest and high principles but also to the 
completeness of the equipment of his plant, the latter due entirely 
to his own inventions. These include the Hall's Improved Automatic 
Spool Printing Press, the first ever invented, by which spools axe 
stamped on both ends at one time and in two colors on the wood; 
the Patent Tension Regulator; the Hall Patent Thread Finishing 
Machine, and the automatic spool bins. His inventiveness has com- 
bined with his deep interest in the welfare of his employees to make 
his mills sanitary, well ventilated, and up-to-date. The mill village 
is a very sightly one and the employees are housed in more than fifty 



*"6 GARDINER HALL, JR. 

model tenements. The public hall, school, depot, post-office, and stores 
are all under Mr. Hall's care and ownership. The village is watered 
by spring water under gravitation and a unique artificial lake with 
bath houses and a band-stand supply amusements for the people. 
Most of the hands are sons and daughters of old employees, and the 
prevailing spirit is one of mutual good will and satisfaction. The 
family homestead stands on a splendid and well stocked farm of six 
hundred acres. Here Mr. Hall's inventive genius has availed much, 
as is seen in the many original devices for the care of the live stock. 
Mr. Hall owns the mill business of E. H. Hall & Son at North 
Windham, Connecticut, and is the largest stockholder in the famous 
Berkshire Cotton Manufacturing Company of Adams, Massachusetts, 
of which he has been a director since its organization. For many 
years he has had similar connections with the Ponemah Cotton Mills 
at Taftville and the Greylock Shirt Company at Adams. He was 
one of the incorporators of the Greylock Bank at Adams, as well as 
of the Stafford Savings Bank of Stafford, Connecticut. He is also a 
director in the American La France Fire Engine Company of Elmira, 
New York; the Windham Silk Company of Willimantie, and the 
White Mountain Paper Company of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. 

Ground has recently been broken for a beautiful church which 
Mr. Hall is planning to build in South Willington as a memorial to 
his talented and beloved daughter, Clara Adeline, wife of George 
Stors Elliot of Willimantie, who died in November, 1899. His 
children now living are William Henry, Eose 0., Ida May and 
Elizabeth Day. The son's life appears elsewhere in this work. Mrs. 
Hall's maiden name was Fanny Parker; she was born in England 
and the date of their marriage was November, 1862. 

Though Mr. Hall is well past seventy he is in rugged health and 
very active in business and in constant improvement of factory and 
village. He attends the Baptist Church and affiliates with the 
Republican party and was a presidential elector in 1896 when his 
friend William McKinley was elected. Motoring is his favorite 
recreation. The development of his manufacturing interests, his 
farm, and his village are his great interests in life and their great 
success is strong testimony to the virtue of a busy career actuated 
by singleness of purpose, to have, to create and to cultivate for others 
the lest. 



WILLIAM HENRY HALL. 

HALL, WILLIAM HENRY, manufacturer and prominent 
citizen of South Willington, Connecticut, was born in that 
town on May 31st, 1867, the son of Gardiner and Frances 
Parker Hall, both of whom are now living in 1909 at the respective 
ages of seventy-two and seventy years and are as active as many 
persons a decade younger. William Hall's father is a native of 
Newport, Rhode Island. His grandfather had six children, five of 
whom married and had sixteen children, of whom the present William 
was the only male bearing the name of Hall. His unmarried uncle, 
William Henry Hall, was killed by a Confederate bullet at the age 
of twenty-two, at Newmarket, Virginia, in May, 1864. Frances 
Parker Hall, the present William Hall's mother, was born in England 
and was one of seven children to come with their mother to this 
country in a sailing vessel in 1864, being nine weeks on the water. 
The father, Gardiner Hall, Jr., with a capital of $350.00 (which he 
saved on $1.25 wages) and the far more substantial backing of 
honesty, thrift, and inventive ingenuity, began the making of spool 
cotton thread in 1860. His diminutive plant, in which he laboriously 
made thread by hand, with the encouraging help of his young wife, 
who did the spooling and winding, was the modest beginning of the 
present complete plant of Gardiner Hall, Jr. and Company, whose 
superior products girdle the globe, and which is one of the brightest 
gems in the industrial crown of Connecticut. 

The Willimantic High School and Wesleyan Academy furnished 
William H. Hall's early education and prepared him for college. 
He then entered Wesleyan University, where he was graduated in 
1892. He then began his life work in his father's mill, worked his 
way into a partnership and is now a member of the firm, whose 
name is a synonym for unsurpassed quality of goods and square busi- 
ness methods. The firm's New York office is at 59 Walker Street, 
Manhattan, where, since 1871, it has occupied a large block which it 
purchased in 1908. It is an independent house. At a meeting of 

309 



310 WILLIAM HENRY HALL. 

thirty of the largest thread manufacturers of the country, both in 
and out of the Trust, to consider the reduction of the tariff on thread 
made by the Aldrich Bill, William H. Hall was chosen chairman of 
the committee to go to Washington when the cotton schedules were 
up before the Ways and Means Committee and, as a result, the rates 
were left undisturbed. 

Colonel Hall, as he is popularly called, has a natural sagacity 
that has been cultivated by many political contests, but, just as in 
business he refuses to be part of a powerful clique to control the 
market, his public acts have never been maladroit or simulated. 
He was the youngest member of the State Senate in 1899, was a 
member of the Connecticut House of Eepresentatives in 1893, 1895, 
1897, 1905, and 1909, and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention 
of 1902. In 1905 he was paymaster-general on the staff of Governor 
Eoberts. He strongly espoused the cause of Everett J. Lake in 
the battle for the gubernatorial nomination in 1908 and was a 
strong factor in Tolland County for B. J. Hill for United States 
Senator in his January, 1909, contest. With a contempt for cheap 
and shallow political tactics and shams, Colonel Hall fights in the 
open, but with no malevolence toward an adversary, and his sincerity 
and integrity have never been questioned. His sensible optimism 
and sanguine temperament form a valuable part of his equipment 
as a public man. In his speeches his ideas are positive and well 
formulated and his arguments are clear and convincing. He is 
admired by his friends and townspeople for his honesty and candor, 
which are the reproduction of market parental traits. He was a 
delegate to the Republican Convention that named Roosevelt in 1904 
and to the same body when it nominated Taft in 1908. He has been 
registrar and secretary of the school board in his home town for a 
period of ten years. 

Large and varied business connections absorb much of Colonel 
Hall's time. He is a director in the American La France Fire Engine 
Company of Elmira, New York; the Berkshire Cotton Company of 
Adams, Massachusetts, and the Windham Silk Company of 
Willimantic, besides being associated with his father in the owner- 
ship of the thread manufacturing mills known as Gardiner Hall, Jr. 
and Company. He is president of the Stafford Springs Agricultural 
Society. He loves good horses and owns a number of excellent ones, 



WILLIAM HENEY HALL. 311 

among them being "Asa Wilke," 2.09%, the beautiful chestnut 
stallion that started without a mark in 1908, and in twenty races 
has won seventeen first, two seconds, and eighth position in the 
$15,000.00 pacing division of the Eeadville Handicap. The Colonel 
enjoys automobiling and has covered more than thirty thousand miles 
of road in his two large Pierce Arrow cars during the last two 
seasons. He is fond of social life and his genial manner makes him 
a good comrade. He is a thirty-second degree Mason. 

On June 14th, 1894, Colonel Hall married Miss Alice May 
Holman, daughter of Judge and Mrs. William D. Holman of Tolland, 
and they have five children: Doris Elizabeth, Gardner Holman, 
Clara Alice, Holman Henry, and Frances Helen. Mrs. Hall is in 
the eleventh generation of direct descent from Elder William 
Brewster. Colonel Hall is in the ninth generation of descent from 
John Hall, who came from Coventry, Warwickshire, England, in 
1630, to Charlestown, Massachusetts, being then twenty-one years old. 
He was a member of the First Church of Charlestown and was made 
a freeman in May, 1634. Colonel Hall has three living sisters, Miss 
Eosa C, Miss Ida M., of South Willington, and Mrs. E. H. Paige of 
Springfield, Massachusetts. 



HUGH HENRY OSGOOD. 

OSGOOD, HUGH HENKY, late business man of Norwich, will 
long be remembered in that community as a public spirited 
and useful citizen, whose wise counsel, Christian philan- 
thropy, and unselfish zeal in promoting the educational, business, 
religious, and civic growth of his city won the lasting gratitude and 
admiration of his fellow men. He was born in Southbridge, Massa- 
chusetts, on October 10th, 1821, his parents being Artemus and 
Saloma Johnson Osgood. 

When he reached the age of fourteen Hugh Osgood left his 
native town and located in Norwich with the purpose of learning 
the drug business. He first entered the employ of Samuel Tyler 
& Son, druggists in Norwich. In March, 1842, he opened a drug 
store in Norwich with his uncle, Dr. Charles Lee, who had adopted 
him as his son. This step soon resulted in their forming the well- 
known partnership of Lee & Osgood, Druggists, with Mr. Osgood 
as junior partner of the firm. After his uncle's death, about twenty 
years later, Mr. Osgood succeeded to the entire business which he 
conducted with marked success until his own death in the fall of 
1899. 

In addition to the drug business Mr. Osgood had many import- 
ant business interests. At the time of his death he was president 
of the Uncas Paper Company, the Dime Savings Bank, the Goodwin 
Cork Company, and of the Sterling Dyeing and Finishing Company 
of Sterling, Connecticut. He was also president of the Norwich 
Drug Association up to the time of his death. Earlier in his career 
he was president of the Worcester Thread Company, the Glasgo Yarn 
Company, and the Norwich Bleaching Company. He was a director 
in the Thames National Bank and the First National Bank, the two 
largest banks in Norwich, and was also a director in the Norwich 
Gas and Electric Light Compaq, the Yantic Woolen Company, the 
Richmond Stove Company, and the Ashland Cotton Company. 

In public affairs Mr. Osgood was equally active and prominent. 

312 



HUGH HENRY OSGOOD. 315 

He was an organizer and the first president of the Norwich Board of 
Trade, he was several terms a member of the Norwich Common 
Council, and for over ten years he was mayor of Norwich, the dates 
of the last named office being 1875-6, and from 1877 to 1886. He 
was the instigator of the fire department and the sewer system of 
Norwich and was foreman of the Wauregan Steam Fire Engine Com- 
pany for a number of years after its organization. He took a keen 
and effective interest in public education and was for forty years 
a trustee of the Center School. He was a fellow of the corporation 
of the Norwich Free Academy. He was one of the original promoters 
of the Norwich Bulletin. In politics he was first a Whig and then 
a Eepublican. 

During the Civil War Mr. Osgood was a zealous supporter of 
the Union cause. He was a member of the Loyal Legion and was 
colonel on Governor Buckingham's staff, being the only member of 
that staff who served throughout the entire administration. He 
was a member of the G. A. R. 

The social and fraternal organizations to which Mr. Osgood 
belonged were as follows: The Kitemaug Association, of which he 
was the president, the Norwich Club, of which he was a charter mem- 
ber, the Order of Scottish Rites, the Arcanum Club, the Knights 
Templar, Somerset Lodge, F. and A. M., St. James Lodge, F. and 
A. M., and Franklin Chapter, R. A. M. In Masonry he attained 
to the thirty-second degree and he was a trustee of the Masonic 
Temple Corporation of Norwich. 

In religious creed Mr. Osgood was a devout Congregationalist 
and a Christian whose inner life as well as his outward conduct 
was a constant testimony to his faith. He was one of the constituent 
members of the Park Congregational Church of Norwich and was 
chairman of the Society's committee of that church for many years. 
He was greatly interested in the new parish house which his church 
was beginning to plan for in his latter days and gave the land for it. 
His wife has since built the present beautiful parish house in his 
memory. Mr. Osgood was vice-president of the Norwich Y. M. C. A. 
and of the United Workers and was at one time president of the 
City Mission of Norwich. His charities were many and generous, 
taking thought, labor, and time as well as money. 

Mr. Osgood died on October 22d, 1899. He is survived by a 
12 



316 HUGH HENRY OSGOOD. 

wife, Mary Ruth Lee Osgood, whom he married in 1892. Mrs. Osgood 
was the daughter of Oliver Lee, a jeweler of Buffalo, New York, and 
a descendant of John Lee who came from Essex County, England, 
to America, about 1634, settling first at Hartford and later at Farm- 
ington. He married Mary, daughter of Deacon Stephen Hart. A 
later notable ancestor of Mrs. Osgood's was Captain Jared Lee, justice 
of peace, deacon, and representative in the General Court of 1754. 
Mrs. Osgood is a member of the D. A. R. and is actively interested 
in the Backus Hospital. 

Of many Connecticut sons it has been said that they were self- 
made men who attained great success in their business or vocation 
and this praiseworthy fact is true of Hugh Henry Osgood. But 
still more is he remembered in living example and influence for his 
strength of character, his rare wisdom, his absolute honor, his unsel- 
fish pxiblic spirit, his kindly charity, Christian living, and goodness 
of heart. It has been well said of him that he was " a man of noble 
powers, nobly used." 



NATHANIEL WHEELER. 

WHEELER, NATHANIEL, organizer and president of the 
Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company, makers of 
Wheeler & Wilson sewing machines, was born in Water- 
town, Litchfield County, Connecticut, September 20th, 1820, and 
died at his home on Golden Hill, Bridgeport, in the same state, 
December 31st, 1893. He was of the seventh generation of his family 
in America, and a descendant of Moses Wheeler, born in England in 
1598, who came to New England with a company from the County of 
Kent. In 1643 he received a tract of land in New Haven. Some four 
or five years later he removed to Stratford. His deed was the first 
recorded at Hartford of the lands bought from the Indians at Strat- 
ford. Orcutt's History of Stratford says, " The first record of any 
public convenience at Stratford is the motion made by Mr. Ludlow 
concerning Moses Wheeler for keeping the ferry at Stratford." He 
was a farmer and ship carpenter and established the ferry across 
the Housatonic River. He lived to the age of one hundred years, 
and at the time of his death was an extensive land owner. His son, 
also named Moses, was born in 1651, and died January 30th, 1724-5. 
In the next generation, Samuel, born February 27th, 1681-2; died, 
1721. The latter's son, Capt. James Wheeler, born 1716, was the 
great-grandfather of Nathaniel; he died in Derby, Connecticut, 
July 9th, 1768. His son, Deacon James Wheeler, born April 6th, 
1745, was Nathaniel's grandfather. He died in Watertown in 1819. 
His son, David Wheeler, the father of Nathaniel, was born Septem- 
ber 6th, 1789. He was a general builder and farmer, and had on 
his farm a small shop where he employed a few men in various ways, 
including the making of wagons and sleighs. He married for his 
first wife Phoebe De Forest, by whom he had two children, Joseph 
and Mary. His second wife was Sarah De Forest, of the same family, 
by whom he had four children: Nathaniel, George, Jane, and 
Belinda. The De Forests were descendants of a Huguenot family 

319 



320 



NATHANIEL WHEELER. 



of Avesnes, France, some of whose members fled to Leyden, Holland, 
to escape religions persecution. One of these named Isaac, son of 
Jesse and Marie (DuCloux) De Forest, emigrated from Leyden to 
New Amsterdam in 1636, and there married Sarah Du Trieux. One 
of their sons, David, settled in Stratford, and was the ancestor of 
the mother of Nathaniel Wheeler. 

Nathaniel attended the schools of his native place, and, as often 
related by his father, took his full share of whatever work was to 
be done on the farm or in the shop. It was this helpfulness to others 
that prevailed throughout his life, and wherever he was there were 
always numberless examples of those to whose welfare he contributed. 
Whatever he accomplished for himself was unimportant compared 
with the benefits felt by those associated with him in the various 
industries fostered by his care. He was early taught by one skilled 
in the work, the elaborate painting then in vogue for vehicles, 
especially sleighs. This enabled him in later years to devise methods 
for finishing woods, which changed the processes in this work through- 
out this country and in other countries as well, and to conduct 
experiments leading to most successful results in finishing the products 
of the Fairfield Kubber Works. On coming of age he took entire 
charge of the business of the shop, his father retiring to the farm. 
A few years later he learned die-sinking and took up the manufacture 
of various small metallic articles, largely buckles and slides, and by 
substituting machinery for hand labor greatly reduced the cost of 
production. He was now well equipped with a knowledge of building, 
wood-working, and finishing, and the working of metals, which 
qualified him to direct work with marked success in all these branches. 
In 1848 he united his business with that of Alanson Warren and 
George Woodruff, manufacturers of similar articles, the new firm 
taking the name of Warren, Wheeler & Woodruff. They bought a 
water privilege on the stream flowing through Watertown, some mile 
and a half below the center, and erected a factory for the enlarged 
business, with Mr. Wheeler in charge. While in New York on 
business and looking for something to more fully occupy the new 
premises he was shown the sewing machine invented by Allen B. 
Wilson, which was then on exhibition and attracting attention. 

While it is true that the art of sewing by machinery was 



NATHANIEL WHEELEB. 821 

American in its origin and development, European genius had 
been groping toward it for nearly a century before. Weisenthal, 
as early as 1755, Heilmann, Thomas Saint (granted an English 
patent in 1790), Thimonier (who first obtained a patent in France 
in 1830), Newton, and Archbold, of England, and possibly others, 
essayed the invention, but not one of these pointed the way to 
a practical sewing machine. Something was said to have been 
done by Walter Hunt, of New York, as early as 1832; but the 
contrivance alleged to have been made was abandoned or neglected 
until the success of others had become publicly known. The im- 
perfect production of Elias Howe, patented in 1846, was, un- 
doubtedly, the first important step toward a practical machine, but 
the perfected "Howe" was not patented until 1857. The inventor 
who first reached satisfactory results in this field was Allen B. Wilson, 
a native of Cortland County, New York. While working at his trade 
as a cabinet-maker in Adrian, Michigan, in 1847, he conceived the 
idea of a sewing machine. He knew nothing of what others had 
thought or done in this direction. In 1848, in Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts, while still working at his trade, he completed the draw- 
ing of his machine, and in the spring of the following year finished 
his model. Although not a machinist and not able to procure suit- 
able tools, he made with his own hands every part of the machine, 
whether of wood or metal. Authorities agree that " this was the 
first machine ever constructed, meeting to any extent the require- 
ments of a sewing machine." This machine enabled the operator to 
control at will the direction of the stitching, and thus to sew con- 
tinuous seams of any length, either straight or curved. Continuing 
to improve and invent he obtained patents in 1850, 1851, 1852, and 
1854. The important improvements were developed after Mr. Wheeler 
became interested, and with his co-operation and suggestion. Im- 
pressed by his first view of Mr. Wilson's achievement, Mr. Wheeler 
contracted with Messrs. E. Lee & Company, of New York, then 
controlling the patent, to build five hundred machines at Watertown, 
Mr. Wilson agreeing to remove to that place and superintend their 
manufacture. Shortly afterward relations with Lee & Company 
ceased and a partnership was formed between Messrs. Warren, 
Wheeler, Woodruff, and Wilson, under the title " Wheeler, Wilson 



322 



NATHANIEL WHEELEK. 



& Company " for the manufacture of sewing machines. They manu- 
factured the original " Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machines " and 
made them successful. This was due to the efforts of Mr. Wheeler, 
who became the mercantile head of the company, and led the improve- 
ments into practical lines. The introduction of the machine, placing 
it in factories and work-shops and demonstrating its value in families, 
was carried out under his control. Opposition, prejudice, and dis- 
belief melted before enterprising activity and perseverance. In a 
brief period the machine was in operation in New York and other 
cities. In October, 1853, the business was reorganized as a joint 
stock company under the laws of Connecticut, taking the title 
" Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company." The capital of the 
corporation was one hundred and sixty thousand dollars, the patents 
being valued at one hundred thousand and the machinery at sixty 
thousand. The new subscribers to this stock, the foundation of the 
fortunes of so many, enjoyed the profits of the business without any 
cost whatever to themselves, as they gave their notes for the stock 
but were never called upon to pay any part of them, as Mr. Wheeler 
financed the business, providing whatever cash was necessary, and 
the notes were paid by the profits of the business as they became due. 
For a year or two Mr. Wheeler acted as the general manager. In 1855 
he became president and filled that office during the remainder of 
his life. 

About the time that the Wheeler & Wilson machine began to 
attract public attention the sewing machine invented by Isaac M. 
Singer became known, also the Grover & Baker sewing machine. 
All of these machines contained principles that Elias Howe thought 
were covered by his patents, and he commenced suits which brought 
them together in defense. While these were being contested, with 
the best obtainable legal talent of the country engaged on all sides, 
Mr. Wheeler proposed that as these machines varied so much, they 
collectively seemed to cover thoroughly the field of sewing by machin- 
ery, yet each obviously had extensive fields to which each was particu- 
larly adapted, and as Elias Howe's patents strengthened all, it seemed 
wise that all should respect his patents, and the patents and devices 
of each other, and in this way join in the defense of each other's rights. 
This plan was adopted, and led to many years of successful business 



NATHANIEL WHEELER. 323 

for all concerned. Mr. Howe for many years received a royalty for 
each machine manufactured hy all these companies, but for several 
years did nothing himself in the way of manufacturing. 

Mr. Wilson, eager to devote attention in other directions and 
explore other fields of invention, among which were cotton picking 
machines, illuminating gases and photography, early retired from 
active participation in the business, retaining stock in the company, 
and receiving the benefit of dividends, a regular salary thereafter 
without services, and substantial sums on renewals of his patents. 
He invested largely in building at North Adams, Massachusetts, the 
scene of part of his early life. He built a residence on a beautiful 
site overlooking the Naugatuck Eiver opposite the city of Waterbury, 
and continued to live there until his death, April 29th, 1888. The 
residence, enlarged, has since become the Waterbury Hospital. His 
inventions have been declared by high authorities to be "as original, 
ingenious, and effective as any to be found in the whole range of 
mechanics." 

In 1856 the factory was removed from Watertown to Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, the company buying and occupying the works of the 
Jerome Clock Company. Mr. Wheeler also removed thither and at 
once identified himself with the interests of the city. With increased 
factory space and improved machinery the business advanced with 
rapid strides. The capital stock was increased from time to time, 
and in 1864 to one million dollars. Fire swept a portion of the 
buildings in 1875, but they were rebuilt immediately on an improved 
plan. Additions were frequently made until the company's works 
covered a ground space of some fifteen acres. In recognition of Mr. 
Wheeler's services in his department of industry he was decorated at 
the World's Exposition held in Vienna in 1873, with the Imperial 
Order of Francis Joseph, and at the Paris Exposition in 1889, he 
received the cross of the Legion of Honor of France. In addition to 
many sewing machine patents, either as sole inventor or jointly with 
others, he held patents for wood filling compounds, power trans- 
mitters, refrigerators, ventilating cars, heating and ventilating build- 
ings. The system for ventilating schoolhouses, originated by him, 
was the forerunner of the best modern practice, and was widely 
sought after and copied. 



324 NATHANIEL WHEELER. 

As a business man Mr. Wheeler was distinguished for his organiz- 
ing and administrative abilities, his energy, enterprise, foresight, 
good judgment, and fair dealing — qualities which were recognized 
throughout the business world. His solicitude for all employed by 
the corporation of which he was the head, was especially marked and 
won for him profound regard. He contributed largely to the success 
of various important local enterprises. He was an incorporator of 
the People's Savings Bank ; a director of the Bridgeport City Bank, 
Bridgeport Hydraulic Company, Bridgeport Horse Railroad Com- 
pany, Fairfield Rubber Company, Willimantic Linen Company, and 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company. He was an 
active member of the Board of Trade, of the Board of Education, 
and of the Building Committees of Schools and County Buildings, 
and a commissioner for building the State Capitol at Hartford. He 
was one of the founders and first president of the Seaside Club; one 
of the chief donors of Seaside Park to the city, and a commissioner 
for its development. He was the principal founder of the business 
of the Bridgeport Wood Finishing Company, and through the in- 
vention of " Wheeler's Wood Filler " introduced new methods in 
finishing woods, which continue to be more and more widely fol- 
lowed. He was a generous contributor and for thirty-three years 
a vestryman of St. John's Episcopal Church. A Democrat in 
politics, Mr. Wheeler repeatedly declined nomination to official 
positions. He served in the Bridgeport Common Council and also 
for several terms in the State Legislature and Senate. Upright in 
every aim, he commanded the esteem of the people of his native state 
and especially of those in the community in which for so long a 
period he was a vital and beneficent factor. Blessed with robust 
health until 1893, he was then overtaken by illness and died just 
as the year closed. Mr. Wheeler's first wife, Huldah Bradley, of 
Watertown, Connecticut, to whom he was married in 1842, died in 
1857. There were four children by this union: Martha, Anna B., 
both of whom died young, and Samuel H. and Ellen B. (Mrs. E. W. 
Harral). Samuel H. Wheeler, who succeeded his father as president 
of the company, was for many years manager of the company's 
business at Chicago. 

On August 3d, 1858, Mr. Nathaniel Wheeler married Miss 
Mary E. Crissy, of New Canaan, Connecticut, who survived her 



NATHANIEL WHEELER. 325 

husband until April 20, 1910. By this marriage there were four sons : 
Harry De Forest, who died in 1881, in his eighteenth year; Archer 
Crissy, and William Bishop, born September 18th, 1864 ; and Arthur 
Penoyer, who died in infancy. Archer Crissy Wheeler filled the office 
of treasurer of the Fairfield Eubber Company, and, with his brother, 
William B. Wheeler, held directorships in the Wheeler & Wilson 
Manufacturing Company. The Wheeler mansion on Golden Hill 
Street, an imposing structure, Gothic in type, is one of the fine 
residences of Bridgeport. 



CHARLES C. GOODRICH. 

GOODRICH, CHARLES C, vice-president and general manager 
of the Hartford & New York Transportation Company, was 
born July 30th, 1845, in Wethersfield, Connecticut, a son 
of Joshua and Mary A. (Wells) Goodrich. 

He was educated at the South Grammar School, in Hartford, and 
at the Williston Academy, in East Hampton, Massachusetts. Charles 
C. Goodrich began his business life in Wethersfield, Connecticut, later 
going to Portland, Connecticut. He then went to New York where he 
engaged in the freighting business for six years and supervised the 
freighting interests on Long Island Sound of M. E. Brazos, who was 
at that time one of the most prominent vessel owners of the East. 
Upon the death of Mr. Brazos and to close up some of his business 
affairs Mr. Goodrich came to Hartford. Later he reorganized the old 
company with which Mr. Brazos had been connected, the new com- 
pany starting with fifteen boats. Prom this beginning Mr. Goodrich's 
enterprise and business plans resulted in the formation of the 
Hartford & New York Transportation Company. Like all other great 
enterprises the first few years of the company's existence were attended 
with disasters sufficient to have disheartened most men, and which 
seemed almost to warrant abandonment of the business. But Charles 
C. Goodrich was not faint-hearted. He did not fail to properly weigh 
the difficulties which were to be met and overcome; but he rightly 
had confidence in his own abilit}', knowledge and experience, and 
through wise and judicious management the company was held 
together and its business placed upon a paying basis. 

In 1896 the company added to their fleet the twin-screw propeller 
" Hartford," of modern build, and in 1898 another boat, the 
" Middletown," built on the same principle. 

One year later, during the Spanish-American War, the first of 
these was sold to the United States Government for a hospital ship; 
and to take the place of it the company built another boat, a fac- 
simile of the " Middletown", which bears the name " Hartford "; and 

326 



CHARLES C. GOODRICH. 329 

these two finely equipped steamers run daily between Hartford and 
New York, giving a service which is of great value to the general 
public and to the merchants, who are greatly benefited by having 
their choice of water routes and rates in competition with the one 
railroad which serves this section. These boats are especially adapted 
for navigation in shoal water, and have a light draft suitable for the 
shallow water of the river, although the boats are thoroughly sea- 
worthy for the long trip through the Sound. Their tonnage is about 
fifteen hundred tons each, with stateroom and berth capacity for about 
four hundred passengers ; these quarters are comfortably fitted up, are 
kept scrupulously clean and inviting, and in a thoroughly sanitary 
condition. During the summer months they are crowded to their 
fullest capacity, for this line of boats is one of the best plying the 
waters of the Sound. 

For more than forty years Mr. Goodrich has devoted and given 
himself to the study of marine commerce especially as applied to 
the problems arising along the Sound and the Connecticut Eiver, and 
it is safe to say that no man living is more familiar with every inch 
of these waters. He can pilot a boat as surely as any man in his 
employ. 

For thirty-four years he has devoted himself to the welfare and 
growth of the Hartford & New York Transportation Company, 
as a loving mother devotes herself to her child, watching over it, 
guarding its every interest, moving here, there, everywhere, his 
tireless energy and intelligent watchfulness protecting it at every 
point. Of all the company's officers and employees, Mr. Goodrich is 
oldest in time of service, and the company itself is peculiarly his 
creation. The company has constantly grown. In 1880 it purchased 
the ship yard and marine railway formerly belonging to M. L. Darton, 
at Dutch Point, and since then it has built many barges and tugs, 
some thirty in all. 

The fleet now comprises more than fifty coastwise vessels and 
steamers. It has the very latest, most powerful and most economical 
vessels in the world which are adapted to river navigation and suitable 
for deep sea going. 

It also has a fleet of barges so new, large and suitable for their 
work as to bring a request from one of the greatest coal mining com- 
panies in the world for the use of its design for the construction of 



330 



CHARLES C. GOODRICH. 



their sea going shoal harbor barges carrying coal to eastern ports. 
These barges, one of which is now on the ways at Bast Hartford, cost 
nearly $20,000 each. 

The company's new tugs, the most powerful of their size on 
Long Island Sound, cost from $40,000 to $80,000 each. 

This company operates lines running from New York to Hart- 
ford, from New York to Providence, E. I., and from New York to 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Mr. Goodrich is a member of the Hartford Board of Trade and 
naturally takes great interest in the efforts now being made for the 
improvement of the Connecticut Biver. His company and himself 
have more at stake than all other interests, and have done more than 
all others to create, sustain and increase traffic on the river. 

Those who are seeking to improve the river the fortunate in hav- 
ing at their disposal for their guidance such a wealth of accurate 
knowledge and technical wisdom as is placed at their command through 
the life work of Charles C. Goodrich. 

Mr. Goodrich's continued devotion to the Hartford & New York 
Transportation Company has not kept him entirely free from other 
contiguous enterprises. He is president of the Maine Steamship 
Company which operates boats between New York and Portland, 
Maine, and whose entire stock is owned by the Hartford and New York 
Transportation Company. He is also director of the Middletown Coal 
Company, of which his brother, Frederick W., is vice-president, one 
of the most successful corporations of its kind in the state. 

In 1875, Charles C. Goodrich was married to Miss Beulah 
Murray, daughter of Calvin Murray, a ship-builder of Guilford, 
Connecticut, in which town the daughter was born, being one of four 
children, three of whom survive. Charles C. and Beulah Goodrich 
have one son, Baymond M., who was associated with his father in 
the Company, but is now in business in Hartford on his own account. 

Baymond N. Goodrich was on January 7, 1902, married to Alma 
Penfield, second daughter of Alice Harvey and the late Edward Z. 
Penfield of New York City, and they have one daughter, Genevieve 
Griswold Goodrich, born in Hartford, Connecticut, on April 7th, 1904. 





'OCtA-7 



EDGAR LUKE ROPKINS. 

ROPKINS, EDGAR LUKE, founder and head of the firm of 
Ropkins and Company of Hartford, was born an Englishman, 
but his entire mature life and business career has been spent 
as an American citizen. He was born in the Village of Hexton, 
Hertfordshire, England, on September 24, 18G3. His father, James 
William Ropkins, was an architect and builder, and held the office 
of sheriff in his home town. Mr. Ropkins' mother, Betsey Elizabeth 
West Ropkins, died when he was but three years of age and he was 
thereafter brought up by an aunt whose excellent moral training and 
loving devotion were strong factors in shaping his character and 
ideals. As he had regular duties to perform in boyhood, before and 
after school, and during the vacation periods, he learned habits of 
industry and self-restraint at an early age. These good influences 
and early application to fixed duties enabled him to realize his boy- 
hood ambition to start in business in the United States in early 
manhood. He studied at the National School at Westoning, Hert- 
fordshire, England, until he reached the age of fourteen. From that 
time until he became seventeen he worked for his father in his native 
"village. Then, in 1880 he came to the United States and started in 
business in the employ of Streeter and Denison, a brewing company, 
of Brooklyn, New York. He has been engaged in the brewing business 
continuously ever since that time and his early zeal in studying 
chemistry made him soon become an expert brewmaster. 

In 1892 Mr. Ropkins came to Hartford and established the now 
famous firm of Ropkins and Company of which he is the proprietor 
and head. He has given over thirty years to the brewing business 
and his success is well known. 

Mr. Ropkins is a Mason, an Elk, a member of the Putnam 
Phalanx, the Hartford Club, the Hartford Country Club, the Hart- 
ford Yacht Club, the Hartford Automobile Club, and the Union 
League Club of New Haven. He enjoys motoring, golf, and fishing. 
In politics he is a Republican. In boyhood he was made a member 

833 



334 EDGAR LUKE ROPKINS 

of the Church of England in his native town and since he came to 
Hartford to live he has attended Trinity (Episcopal) Church. He 
believes that men will best deserve success by " working earnestly and 
hard, with a fixed purpose in view," and that " with honesty added, 
the young American of today who has the advantage of free education 
should win success." 

On the seventh of October, 1893, Mr. Ropkins married Kate A. 
Conkling. No children have been born to them. Their home is at 
856 Prospect Avenue, Hartford. 



EDWARD BUCKINGHAM HATCH. 

HATCH, EDWARD BUCKINGHAM, manufacturer, was born 
at Hartford, December 20th, 1861, son of George Edwin 
and Laura Stanley (Styles) Hatch. His first paternal 
American ancestor was Nathaniel, who came to this country from 
England in 1635 and settled in Falmouth, Mass. His son, Captain 
Zephaniah Hatch, made his home in Guilford, Connecticut, and com- 
manded a ship engaged in West India trade. 

He married Johanna Chittenden who came of a family promi- 
nent in the Revolutionary War, and which produced Thomas 
Chittenden, first governor of Vermont. Major Timothy Hatch, born 
in 1757, brought added distinction to the family name by his service 
in the Revolutionary War. Enlisting when a mere lad at the outbreak 
of hostilities, he was taken prisoner at the battle of White Plains. At 
the close of the war, he served as major in the state militia and was 
among those called out to suppress Shay's Rebellion. He settled in 
Hartford in 1804, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits and as an 
exchange broker. His son, Timothy Lines Hatch, married a niece of 
Henry William Sheperd, who also had taken part in putting down 
Shay's Rebellion, and whose family were prominent Revolutionary 
patriots. Timothy Lines Hatch was the great-grandfather of Edward 
B. Hatch, the line of descent being traced through Walter S. and 
George E. Hatch. The latter was a merchant interested in civic 
affairs and serving at one time in the court of common council. His 
son Edward B., obtained his early education at the public schools of 
Hartford, his preparatory work for college being done at the Hartford 
High School. From there he entered Trinity College, Hartford, in 
1882 and was graduated Bachelor of Arts in 1886. In 1886 there 
was organized in Hartford a new manufacturing concern known as 
the Johns-Pratt Company, the founders being Henry W. Johns, of 
New York, and Rufus N. Pratt, of Hartford; the officers being Mr. 
Johns president, Charles H. Patrick, vice-president, Mr. Pratt, 

387 



338 EDWARD BUCKINGHAM HATCH. 

secretary, and Mr. Hatch as clerk. In 1893 Mr. Hatch was made 
secretary and manager. The capitalization was $100,000 and the 
product of manufacture was Vulcabeston packings and electrical 
insulating materials. 

In 1892 the capital was increased to $150,000 for the purpose of 
increasing the factory and providing facilities for the manufacture of 
new lines. 

In 1898 the company began the manufacture of " Noark " fuses 
and electric protective devices. Starting at the bottom, Mr. Hatch 
familiarized himself with every branch of the business. He ad- 
vanced step by step till in 1898 he was made president and treasurer 
of the company, which positions he still holds. The company has 
been remarkably successful from the start and has been compelled from 
time to time to increase the size of its plant, until today it ranks as 
one of the leading industries of Hartford. 

In 1905 by a stock dividend of one hundred per cent., the capital 
was increased to $300,000. While it may not be known as a one man 
concern, the growth and success of the company is due for the most 
part to the executive ability and business judgment of Mr. Hatch. 
The new officers at the present time are Charles E. Newton, secretary, 
and Robert C. Buell, assistant secretary. 

The factory consists of eleven buildings, employing about five 
hundred hands. The company holds patents of a very wide range 
covering electric protective devices and their accessories. The H. W. 
Johns-Manville Company, of New York, are the sole selling agents, 
and through their twenty-five branches the products are distributed 
throughout the world under the trade marks " Vulcabeston ", 
" Noark ", " J. P. Co." For many years Mr. Hatch has been identi- 
fied with other manufacturing enterprises and with banking institu- 
tions in the capacity of director. He is a director in the Hartford 
National Bank and in the Dime Savings Bank of Hartford; trustee 
of Trinity College and of the Colt Bequest in charge of the large 
property left by Colonel Samuel Colt and his widow. He is also 
active in social, fraternal and church life. High up in Masonry, he is 
a member of St. John's Lodge, of Woleott Council, of Pythagoras 
Chapter, of Washington Commandery, Knights Templar, and of 
Sphinx Temple of the Mystic Shrine. 

He is a member of the Hartford, Farmington Country, Hartford 



EDWARD BUCKINGHAM HATCH. 339 

Golf, Twentieth Century, Kepublican and University clubs and of the 
Alpha Delta Phi fraternity. 

He is vestryman and treasurer of Trinity Episcopal Church of 
Hartford, and a member of the Church Club of Connecticut. He has 
also been identified with the military organizations, having served five 
years as a member of Company K, First Eegiment Connecticut 
National Guards. His chief recreations are golf and fishing. 

Mr. Hatch was married at Hartford, Connecticut, September 
12th, 1881, to Georgia, daughter of the late George W. Watson, by 
whom he has three children, Helen, James Watson, and Edward 
Watson Hatch. 



GARDINER GREENE. 

GREENE, GARDINER, attorney at law, former state repre- 
sentative and one of the leading churchmen of Norwich, was 
bom in that town, New London County, on August 31st, 1851. 
His first ancestor in this country was John Greene, a surgeon, who 
came from Salisbury, England, to America in 1635 and settled in 
Warwick, Rhode Island. One of Mr. Greene's most distinguished 
ancestors was John Haynes, the first governor of Connecticut. 
Another famous ancestor was Samuel Wyllis, who concealed the Con- 
necticut Charter from Governor Andros. The ancestor from whom 
Mr. Greene takes his name was Lyon Gardiner of Gardner's Island. 
Mr. Greene's father was Gardiner Greene, a cotton manufacturer, and 
his mother was Mary Ricketts Adams Greene. 

Excellent educational advantages were among the blessings of 
Gardiner Greene's youth. He first attended private schools and then 
the Norwich Free Academy, where he prepared for college. He next 
entered Yale University, where he was graduated with the degree of 
B. A. in 1873. Two years later he entered the Law School of Colum- 
bia University, where he received his LL.B. degree in 1877. The law 
was his own choice of a profession and he lost no time in starting 
upon the active practice of his calling. He was admitted to the 
Bar of New York in May, 1877, and to the Connecticut Bar in 1878. 

Since 1878 Mr. Greene has practiced law continuously in Norwich 
and he has built up a large and eminent clientele. He began his 
legal career as a partner of the late John T. Wait and continued with 
him until the tatter's death in 1901. Since then Mr. Greene has 
maintained his own law office and has continued to add steadily to 
his prestige as a lawyer. 

In 1891 and again in 1895 Mr. Greene was elected state repre- 
sentative. In 1900 Mr. Greene was appointed a member of the com- 
mission for the revision of the state statutes. In various other ways 
he has served the public and the Republican party, of which he has 
always been a staunch member. 

340 




^^Z^?Z&**jC*~ CS^-i 



r^ze^^CS, 



GARDINEB GEEENB. 343 

Church life and work axe an important part of Mr. Greene's 
activities, for he is a prominent member of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church and is active not only in parish affairs in Norwich but also 
in the broader diocesan interests. For many years he has been a dele- 
gate to the Diocesan Convention of the church. He is a vestryman of 
Christ Church parish, Norwich. 

The only fraternal tie maintained by Mr. Greene is his member- 
ship in the Wolf's Head Society of Yale University. His time is so 
thoroughly absorbed by professional, ecclesiastical, civic and home 
interests that he has never seen fit to affiliate with Masonic or other 
orders. 

Mr. Greene is married, his wife being Louise Eustis Eeynolds 
Greene, whom he married on April 4th, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Greene 
make their home at 3 Sachem Terrace, Norwich. 



JOSEPH WRIGHT ALSOP 

ALSOP, JOSEPH WRIGHT, state senator and agriculturist of 
Avon, Hartford, County, Connecticut, was born in Middle- 
town, Connecticut, on April 2d, 1876. He traces his ancestry 
to Richard Alsop who came from England to Newtown, Long Island, 
in 1686, to Anthoyne Oliver who came from France to Boston in 
1685, and to George Wyllys who came from England to Hartford in 
1635. His father was Joseph Wright Alsop, a physician and farmer, 
who was state representative one term, state senator several terms, 
and lieutenant governor in 1891. His wife, the present senator's 
mother, was Elizabeth Winthrop Beach. 

Wilson's School in Middletown and Groton School in Groton, 
Massachusetts, were the institutions in which Joseph Alsop received 
his elementary and college preparatory education. He then went 
abroad and studied at the University of Berlin, in Germany. Upon 
his return he took the course in mechanical engineering at the Shef- 
field Scientific School of Yale University, where he was graduated 
with the degree of Ph.B. in 1898. 

As soon as he completed his scientific course at Yale Mr. Alsop 
went West and spent a year as a " ranch hand " in Douglas County, 
Colorado. From 1899 to 1901 he was connected with the Denver 
Land and Water Company of Denver, Colorado, as superintendent of 
their ranches and irrigation system. In 1901 he returned to Middle- 
town and became identified with the Russell Manufacturing Company, 
with whom he remained until 1903. Since 1903 he has lived in Avon, 
where he owns a large farm, the management of which is his chief 
work. Tobacco raising is his agricultural specialty, and he also has 
one of the foremost herds of Guernsey cattle in the state. 

He has held various town offices in Avon and is one of the 
strongest Republicans and public men of the community, In 1907 he 
was elected state representative and served on the committee on incor- 
porations. In 1909 he was elected state senator and became a member 
of the committee on claims and chairman of the committee on roads, 

344 



JOSEPH WEIGHT ALSOP 347 

bridges and rivers. He is, at present, chairman of the town school 
committee and holds various other town offices in Avon. 

Senator Alsop is one of the youngest senators in the state. In 
the pursuit of agriculture which he finds so congenial he has had rare 
success for so young a man. His interests are by no means confined 
to politics and farming, in spite of his great and early success in both. 
He has many social and fraternal ties and keenly enjoys all outdoor 
sports. He is a member of St. Mark's Lodge No. 36, F. and A. M., 
Columbia Chapter, No. 31, R. A. M., Washington Commandery, 
Knights Templar and King Phillips Lodge, Knights of Phythias. 
In creed and church membership he in an Episcopalian. He is a 
member of the local Grange and is also a member of the Order of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

On November 4th, 1909, Senator Alsop married Corinne Douglas 
Eobinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Eobinson of New York, 
and niece of Ex-president Eoosevelt. 



WALTER SCOTT ATWOOD. 

ATWOOD, WALTER SCOTT, president and general manager "of 
the Plume and Atwood Manufacturing Company, brass and 
brass goods manufacturers of Waterbury. He was born 
in Woodbury, Litchfield County, Connecticut, on March 11th, 
1837, has parents being Washington H. and Maria Stone Atwood. 
His father was engaged in the meat business and farming and 
served as a lieutenant under Jackson during the War of 1812. 
Through him Mr. Atwood is descended from Captain Thomas 
Atwood, captain of an army under Oliver Cromwell, who settled 
in Wethersfield in very early times, was a noted physician and 
died in 1682. On the maternal side Mr. Atwood is descended from 
John Stone who settled in Guilford in 1620. 

When Walter Atwood was ten years old his father died and he 
was obliged to become self-supporting by working out his board and 
clothes on a farm in Washington, Connecticut. He was thus debarred 
from attending school except during the short winter term. These 
early tasks taught him the value of industrious habits and he has 
always loved work and found it the secret of both success and happi- 
ness. Added to this early lesson of thrift in the use of time were 
the good influences of his mother, who was a noble example to him 
in every way. 

After a few years of farm work Walter Atwood spent four highly 
adventurous years at sea on a trading and whaling vessel that 
touched at " all parts of the world except the two poles." 

Previous to his going to sea Mr. Atwood had worked for some 
time in a factory making thimbles and spectacles and when he returned 
from his long voyage he determined to enter manufacturing life. 
He became engaged in the brass industry known as the Scoville 
Manufacturing Company and he has been identified with the brass 
business ever since. In early manhood he entered the Plume and 
Atwood Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, extensive manufac- 
turers of brass and brass goods, and, by a series of promotions, ha 

348 




W^^^-c^ 



WALTER SCOTT ATWOOD. 351 

has held every office in the company until he is now its president 
and general manager. His progressive career from a farmer's chore 
boy to the head of a large manufacturing company is entirely 
of his own carving and building, unaided by any advantages of a 
higher education, inherited competence, or any other help than his 
own sagacity, steady purpose, and persistent industry. His life work 
has filled his time to the exclusion of fads and hobbies, but he has 
found sufficient satisfaction and pleasure in that work for all his needs. 

Besides the strong fraternal ties as a thirty-third degree Mason, 
Mr. Atwood has been a member of the Waterbury Club and the 
Home Club since their organization. He has been a loyal Republican 
ever since he cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. His business 
creed is " square dealing, honest work, and strict adherence to the 
truth," and he advises young men to build their hopes of success on 
this three-fold and secure foundation. 

Mr. Atwood makes his home in Waterbury the year around, 
though of late years he has found benefit in travel in the south for 
a part of the winter. He is married and his wife was Mary Jane 
Wood when he married her in 1860. Though four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Atwood but one is now living, a son, Walter 
Scott Atwood, Jr. 



HORACE GARDNER TALCOTT. 

TALCOTT, HOEACE GABDNEE, social, political, and in- 
dustrial leader of Talcottville, Connecticut, was born in 
Vernon, Connecticut, November 14th, 1847, and has always 
made his home and his headquarters there, although his activities have 
reached to other centers. No attractions elsewhere have been strong 
enough to draw him from his love and allegiance to the place known 
everywhere as the home of his family and named after them. His 
father was Horace Wells Talcott, who with his brother, Charles 
Denison Talcott, established the firm of Talcott Brothers, of which, 
since 1882, Horace G. Talcott has been the head. The foundation 
for the business was laid in 1802-4 when Daniel Fuller built some 
small mills on the site, which mills passed ultimately into the posses- 
sion of Nathaniel 0. Kellogg who died May 13, 1854. 

The Talcott family in America had sprung from John, the 
emigrant ancestor, who was born in Braintree, County of Essex, 
England, and with his wife came with other of Eev. Thomas Hooker's 
company to Newtown, now Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1632. In 
1635 John Talcott sent forward a carpenter who erected for him 
one of the first residences built in Hartford, which John Talcott and 
his family occupied the following year. 

John Talcott's grandson, Joseph, was Governor of Connecticut 
for seventeen years, 1725-1742, only one other Governor having ever 
exceeded this term ; Jon Winthrop served eighteen years, while Gurdon 
Saltonstall. Governor Talcott's immediate predecessor, equaled the 
latter by having served seventeen years. Governor Talcott was the 
first governor of the state who was born in Connecticut. Horace Wells 
Talcott, on October 9th, 1842, was married to Jane M., daughter of 
Albert and Tacy (Greene) Gardner, and they had two children: the 
late Bosa J. (the widow of Samuel A. Talcott), and Horace G. On 
his mother's side Mr. Talcott's ancestors were also distinguished, for 
they included the Gardners, Greenes and Hardings, all of whom were 
among the oldest and most important families of New England, and 

352 




£hy fyZ' i: U G '& ■ -,j 3 Sr<7 7S¥~ 




HORACE GARDNER TALCOTT. 855 

a member of the last named family, Captain Stephen Harding, served 
with honor in the Revolutionary War. These are excellent family 
trees from which superior types of men would be expected, and Horace 
G. and the younger members of the firm show no traces of 
deterioration. 

H. G. Talcott received his elementary and high school education 
in Eockville. In 1867 he was graduated from Phillips Academy at 
Andover, Massachusetts, then under the administration of Dr. Samuel 
Taylor, and for a time Mr. Talcott was connected with the class of '71 
at Yale, but ill health compelled him to abandon his college work and 
to take up an active business life. 

His father had entered the Kellogg mill in 1838, and had spent 
two-thirds of his life there. His uncle, Charles Denison Talcott, had 
entered the Kellogg mill in 1850. The two brothers were very closely 
associated with Mr. Kellogg, and when he died, in 1854, the executors 
entrusted the management of the factory to them. 

In July, 1856, H. W. and C. D. Talcott bought the property and 
formed the firm of Talcott Brothers, and somewhat later changed the 
name of the village from Kelloggville to Talcottville. For thirteen 
years the brothers prospered steadily; then two calamities came, in 
quick succession. September 20th, 1869, the lower mill was burned, 
and on October 4th, 1869, a flood swept away the dam and part of the 
upper mill. They rebuilt on a site halfway between the upper and 
lower mill. 

It was in this mill that Horace G. Talcott entered upon leaving 
Yale. When his father died in 1871, he became the superintendent 
of the mill, and on the death of his uncle in 1882, he came into the 
general management of the business. By the industry, energy and 
ability of Mr. Talcott and his associates, the business was carried for- 
ward successfully and made one of the important mills of New Eng- 
land engaged in the manufacture of woolens and union cassimeres. 

In 1866-7 Talcott Brothers built a brick Congregational church 
costing $30,000; in 1880 they built a brick schoolhouse sufficient for 
the needs of the community which had grown up around their mills; 
and Charles D. Talcott projected a brick library building but died 
before its occupation. The firm carried out the plans and furnished 
and have maintained, a well-selected library. 

No intoxicating liquors were allowed to be sold on the premises 
of the firm and only men with desirable habits were selected as 



356 HORACE GARDNER TALCOTT. 

employees. The result was a community free from the disadvantages 
and drawbacks which inevitably obtain in communities fostering 
enterprises that feed upon the thrift and earnings of the residents, 
and turned their energies into destructive channels. 

Inspired by the same faith and devotion to high ideals which 
guided the other members of his family, Horace G. Talcott succeeded 
his uncle as deacon of the Congregational Church and also as superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school, having held these offices over twenty- 
seven years ; he became a director of the Connecticut Home Missionary 
Society, was elected a member of the National Society, and for thir- 
teen years has been president of the Tolland County Missionary 
Society. 

Mr. Talcott has a sound judgment, a rich and saving common- 
sense, beside the more brilliant gift of a wit which delights men's 
hearts. He is a believer in human freedom, — in freedom of thought, 
speech, and action. Within the sphere of his liberty as the con- 
scientious and Christian man, he moves freely as he will and thinks 
others should do likewise without overmuch regard for criticism. 
Virtue by repression and compulsion seem impracticable to his mind; 
he seeks rather to give the example which inspires and would trust to 
the gracious leverage of kindly conduct to elevate his fellow-men. 

Mr. Talcott is a high-minded as well as a strong-minded man, 
and it may be added, a profoundly religious man. He works no ill, 
speaks no ill, thinks no ill of his neighbor. On the contrary, his most 
marked characteristic is his friendliness. He is sympathetic, cordial, 
and demonstrative in a way that binds others to him by a peculiar 
affection. As our friends are our best possessions, Mr. Talcott is 
rich indeed. 

To all religious, charitable, and educational interests, both local 
and world-wide, Mr. Talcotfs heart and hand are ever open, and he 
is a tower of strength to the Church of God in his town. 

In politics Mr. Talcott is a Eepublican and represented the town 
of Vernon in the General Assembly of 1895, in which he served on 
the banking committee. Mr. Talcott has been a member of the 
Rockville High School Committee for some years. 

In commercial life he has been active in various enterprises and 
directions. He is a director in the First National Bank of Rockville, 
and of the National Machine Company of Hartford; he is also a 
trustee of various funds. 




"V : '"'W?^?? 



GEORGE ASAHEL HAMMOND. 

HAMMOND, GEORGE ASAHEL, president of the silk 
manufacturing firm of Hammond, Knowlton and Company 
of Putnam, Connecticut, president of the Hampton Silk 
Company, former state representative, and in many other ways a 
leader in public affairs, was born in Hampton, Connecticut, May 
26, 1841. The Hammond family is an English one of high standing 
and dates back to the time of Oliver Cromwell. Probably the best 
known branch of the family in England has been that of St. Albans 
Court, Nonington, County Kent, of which branch but one repre- 
sentative has ever made his home in America, that being Edward 
Hammond, who came to Virginia in 1635 and introduced the culture 
of silk worms. Some of his letters are still extant and are in the 
possession of the present family at St. Albans Court. The New 
England branch of the Hammond family was founded by one of 
the name, who came from England as one of the early settlers of 
that part of the suburbs of Boston now known as Newton. Mr. 
Hammond's grandfather, Asahel, was a stalwart Connecticut farmer 
and his father, George Robinson Hammond, was a farmer and a 
teacher in Windham County schools. The homestead farm, one of 
the most productive in the county, is called Red Eoof and is now 
occupied by Mr. Hammond's brother, William Henry Hammond. 

The education which George A. Hammond secured in his boy- 
hood was that offered by the local common schools and the noted 
Foster High School of Hampton, supplemented by two terms of 
study at Williston Seminary in Easthampton, Massachusetts, where 
he took a thorough course in penmanship and was for a term assistant 
teacher of that study. For a time he followed in the footsteps of his 
father, teaching in the Windham County schools, but when the Civil 
War broke out he abandoned that calling and enlisted in the army. 

Though he began his career as a private in Company G, 26th 
Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, he was soon raised to the rank 
of orderly sergeant. His regiment served under General Banks 
during the memorable seige of Port Hudson, and when Captain 

359 



360 GEORGE ASAHEL HAMMOND. 

Stanton met his death Mr. Hammond was appointed acting lieutenant 
for the remainder of the term of enlistment. The commander of his 
brigade was General Neal Dow, the noted temperance leader. As 
Mr. Hammond desired to enter business life without any further 
interruption he furnished a substitute for the three remaining years 
of the war, a unique instance. 

In August, 1864, he entered the silk industry with his uncle, 
Charles L. Bottum, in Mansfield, Connecticut. In the various 
departments of silk manufacturing he has had the most competent 
instructors and at the end of two years of constant application to 
the details of the business he gained the position of superintendent 
of the mill. At the end of the third year he was given an interest 
in the business and five years later he was made a member of the 
firm. Early in his career he was recognized as an expert in the 
spooling and finishing of silk and he received many flattering offers 
to go to other mills. 

In the Boston fire the office and stock of the silk company in which 
his cousin, Charles C. Knowlton, was interested were a total loss; he 
was admitted to the firm of C. L. Bottum and Company, composed 
of the uncle and two nephews. 

In 1878 Mr. Hammond settled in Putnam and established him- 
self in the silk business with his cousin, Charles C. Knowlton, as 
an active partner, and George M. Morse as a special partner. Mr. 
Hammond and Mr. Knowlton purchased Mr. Morse's interest in 1881 
and took their salesman, Louis Hauchhaus, into the business. From 
the beginning Mr. Hammond carried on his manufacturing according 
to the highest standards, being particular not only about the quality 
of the goods produced but also about the neat appearance and good 
condition of his factory. His working motto, " Pretty good will not 
do; the best attainable is poor enough," had a marked effect upon the 
development of his industry along all lines, and the sales of the firm 
have steadily increased until probably no concern in the country 
makes a larger output in the specialties of sewing silks, machine twists 
and silk braids. In 1893 Mr. Hammond was a member of the 
Connecticut commission at the Chicago World's Fair and he took 
just pride in the fact that Hammond, Knowlton and Company's silks 
were the official silks of the Exposition, being used exclusively on 
all sewing machines. 



GEOKGE ASAHEL HAMMOND. 361 

On January 1, 1894, Mr. Hammond's firm, with Robert Smith 
and Joshua Newey, formed the New London Wash Silk Company 
at New London, Connecticut, where they produce wash silks of 
superior quality and great popularity. Mr. Hammond has become 
one of the leading silk manufacturers of the day and has gained 
this reputation through his complete mastery of all the processes 
of silk manufacturing and through his honorable and progressive 
business methods. Besides being president of Hammond, Knowlton 
and Company, the Hampton Silk Company and the promoter of the 
New London Wash Silk Company, he has a large interest in the 
Eureka Silk Company and in the Putnam Box Company. He is 
also president of the Putnam Light and Power Company and his 
mill and residence were the first buildings in Putnam to be lighted 
by electricity. 

Soon after Mr. Hammond became a resident of the town of 
Mansfield he was placed upon the school board and he retained his 
membership as long as he remained in that town. In 1876 he 
represented Mansfield in the State Legislature. When he located in 
Putnam he was made a member of the school board of which he 
has been chairman for fifteen years. In 1885 he was elected State 
Eepresentative from Putnam, and was re-elected in 1886 and in 1905. 
During his career in the Legislature he was chairman of the com- 
mittee on manufactures and a member of the railroad committee. 
In his more recent term he had the unique duty of voting for two 
United States Senators, Morgan G. Bulkeley and Prank B. Brandegee, 
to complete the term of Orville H. Piatt, deceased. He has been 
a member of the Republican State Committee for ten years; was 
one of the Presidential Electors who voted for William McKinley 
and has been a delegate to the last three Republican National Con- 
ventions. For two years he was a member of the; executive committee 
of the Home Market Club of Boston, the second year the late William 
P. Draper, ex-United States Senator and Ambassador to Italy, being 
president of the club. On the committee with Mr. Hammond were 
Thomas J. Coolidge, ex-minister to France, W. H. Bent, a subsequent 
president of the club, William A. Russell, ex-member of Congress 
and others of like prominence. Mr. Hammond is now one of the 
vice-presidents of the Home Market Club. 

Mr. Hammond is a member of the Order of the Mystic Shrine, 



362 GEOEGE ASAHEL HAMMOND. 

the Eoyal Arcanum, the A. 0. U. W., the Order of Odd Fellows, 
and a life member of the Order of Elks. He is a member of the 
Hartford Club, the Thames Club of New London, the Arcanum Club 
of Putnam, the Army and Navy Club of Connecticut and the 
Catholic Athletic Club of Putnam. 

On October 12, 1862, Mr. Hammond married Jane Crandall, 
daughter of Hezekiah Crandall and niece of Prudence Crandall, who 
was prominent in anti-slavery days. Two children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Hammond: Charles Henry, who died in his nineteenth 
year, and Bertha Elizabeth, who married the well-known New York 
surgeon, Neil Macphatter, P. E. C. S., and died at the age of thirty- 
one. 



ANGUS PARK. 

PARK, ANGUS, one of the most successful and enterprising 
manufacturers of Connecticut, owning and operating woolen 
mills in Dayville, Hanover, and Glastonbury, Connecticut, 
was born in Galashiel, Scotland, January 27th, 1859, and resided 
there until the age of fourteen, when his family removed to Sher- 
brooke, Canada. 

He is the son of William Park (3) and Catherine (Campbell) 
Park. His paternal great-grandfather, William Park (1) was born 
in Ayreshire, Scotland, and for many years was in the employ of the 
English government as a civil engineer, and while in this service was 
sent to America in the interest of his government. On the voyage 
to America the vessel in which he had taken passage was lost with 
all on board, no tidings having ever been heard of it. He had 
married Marian Gilchrist, who died in Scotland, her native land, 
about the year 1804, aged about fifty-five years. At the time of 
his death William Park was in middle life, and the father of two 
children, William and Marian, the latter dying while young. 

William Park (2), son of William Park (1), was born in 1783, 
in Scotland, and was also for a number of years in the employ of 
his government as a civil engineer. Later he engaged in the hotel 
business in Lethenwater, Tollbar, Scotland, which he conducted 
several years, finally retiring and removing to Galashiels, where he 
lived several years before his death, which occurred in July, 1854. 

He married Elizabeth Welch of Galashiels, where she died in 
August, 1844, and their children were: (1) Marian, who became 
the wife of Joseph Sykes, died in Galashiels; (2) Thomas, who is 
a wool scourer by trade, residing in Galashiels, married Agnes Melrose, 
now deceased; (3) Elizabeth, married Joseph Broadhurst of Gala- 
shiels, where she died; (4) William (3) is more fully mentioned 
below; (5) John, who was a spinner by trade, married Elizabeth 
Shell, and died in Galashiels; (6) James, who was a manager of 
woolen mills, married Elizabeth Robinson, and died in New Zealand ; 
(7) Isabella who died in childhood. 

365 



366 ANGUS PARK. 

William Park (3), son of William Park (2), was bom in 
Lethenwater, Tollbar, Scotland, and he was educated in the schools 
of Galashiels to which place his parents removed while he was in 
his infancy. His early educational training was very meagre as 
he left the school-room when eleven years of age, at which time he 
took up mill work. He learned the spinner's trade and also took up 
the other branches of the woolen business, learning carding and 
weaving. He worked at these trades until in September, 1872, he 
sailed from Liverpool for America. He arrived in Quebec, Canada, 
after a very rough voyage of eleven and a half days. In the new 
world he began work as a spinner in the Paton Mills of Sherbrooke, 
Canada, and after a short time he was put in full charge of the 
twisting and novelty yarn department of the same mill. He remained 
there altogether about twenty years, which speaks well for his mechan- 
ical and executive ability. In 1893, Mr. Park retired from active 
work, and until the death of his estimable wife he resided in ease 
and rest at Sherbrooke. He then made his home with his daughter, 
Mrs. William T. Mountain, in Amesbury, Massachusetts, until the 
present. 

William Park (3) was married January 14th, 1854, in Scotland, 
to Catherine Campbell, who was born in 1836, in Carlyle, Scotland, 
daughter of Angus Campbell, a woolen spinner, and a master at his 
trade. Mrs. Park passed away in Sherbrooke, Canada, June 3d, 
1900, aged more than sixty years. To Mr. and Mrs. William Park 
(3) were born children as follows: (1) Angus, residing at Hanover, 
Connecticut, and the owner of woolen mills there and at Dayville 
and at Glastonbury; (2) William (4), owner of the Eiverside 
Woolen Mills, Stafford, Connecticut; (3) James, who is a director 
in the Angus Park Manufacturing Company, of Glastonbury, Con- 
necticut; (4) George is one of the stockholders and general manager 
and treasurer of the Dumbarton Woolen Company, at Dexter, Maine; 
(5) Thomas is superintendent and part owner of the Dumbarton 
Woolen Company; (6) Eunice, an only sister, is the wife of William 
T. Mountain, a carriage builder residing in Amesbury, Massachusetts. 

From this it will be seen that Angus Park's ancestors and family 
have been and are very large factors in the woolen industry of 
Scotland, Canada, and the United States. 

Angus Park's opportunities for securing an education were con- 



ANGUS PARK. 867 

fined to the common schools of Galashiels, which he attended until 
he was thirteen years old. At that time he went to work in a 
woolen mill, and by constant industry and skill worked his way to 
the position of overseer of the weaving department in the mills of 
the Paton Manufacturing Company, the largest woolen mill in 
Canada, having at that time one hundred and forty people under 
his direct supervision. 

He was employed there until 1894, when he came to East Lyme, 
Connecticut, and became secretary of the Niantic Manufacturing 
Company, being associated with an uncle, D. K. Campbell, and with 
a brother, William Park. He remained there until August, 1899, 
when he severed his connection with that concern and purchased the 
Allen Mill and properties at Hanover, Connecticut, which property 
is now known as the Airlie Mills. This mill had been closed for some 
time, and consequently was in poor condition. Mr. Park remodeled 
the mill and installed new and modern machinery at a great outlay 
of money. The mill is now one of the best in this region, and the 
product is a high grade of woolen and flannel suiting. In March, 
1903, when the Assawauga Company, of Dayville, Connecticut, was 
organized Mr. Park became its manager, and one of its largest stock- 
holders. In 1907, Mr. Park purchased the properties of the Crosby 
Manufacturing Company, at East Glastonbury, Connecticut, and 
organized the Angus Park Manufacturing Company, of which he is 
the treasurer and general manager. 

He is a director in the Thames Loan and Trust Company of 
Norwich, and trustee in the Norwich Savings Society. In all his 
business enterprises Angus Park has been successful through his 
ability, energy, thorough knowledge of his business and devoted atten- 
tion to it. Having begun at the very bottom of the ladder he made 
his way steadily upward, and no man is more highly esteemed than 
he is in the business communities of which he is so important a part 
as well as throughout trade circles where he is so widely known. 

He is a member of Somerset Lodge No. 34, A. P. and A. M., 
of Franklin Chapter, Pranklin Council, and Columbian Commandery, 
of Norwich, and a member of Sphinx Council of Hartford. He is 
also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and of the 
Canadian Order of Foresters. In politics he is a Kepublican, and 
he was a member of the State Legislature in 1905. In religious 
14 



368 ANGUS PARK. 

affiliation he is a member of Hanover Congregational Church, as are 
his wife and children. Mr. Park is choir director of this church. 

On December 24th, 1880, Angus Park was married in Sher- 
brooke, Canada, to Elizabeth Barlow Eadie, daughter of George 
Watt Eadie, a manufacturer of woolen goods in Preston, England, 
who came to Canada in 1867 and for many years was a successful 
dry goods merchant in Sherbrooke. Mr. Eadie retired and lived 
at Norwich, Connecticut, until his death in 1908. 

The children of Angus and Elizabeth B. Park are: Margaret 
Alice, who married Francis G. Way, son of Senator Way, of 
East Lyme, Connecticut, they have one daughter, Elizabeth E. ; 
Catherine Campbell who married N. Lome Creig, assistant super- 
intendent of the Assawauga Mills, Dayville, Connecticut; and 
William George Park, who is vice-president and assistant superin- 
tendent of the Airlie Mills, at Hanover, Connecticut. 

In 1901 Mr. Park erected his handsome home in Hanover, it 
being one of the finest in the town, where his family is so pleasantly 
located. 




p 




HARRY EUGENE BACK. 

BACK, Harry Eugene, lawyer, politician and writer, is well 
known not only as a prominent Windham County lawyer and 
a former state representative but also for his past achieve- 
ments in journalism, for his distinguished college career and for his 
keen and effective interest in the public affairs of Danielson, his 
present home, and the allied towns. His earliest known ancestor 
was his great-grandfather, Lieutenant Judah Back, who lived in 
Hampton and Chaplin, Connecticut, in Revolutionary times. Besides 
his military position he was a farmer and extensive land owner. 
His grandson, Lucius Back, grandfather of the present Harry E. 
Back, was a prosperous farmer and a leading Democrat of Holland, 
Massachusetts, who was honored for his probity, industry and good 
judgment and was frequently given positions of honor and trust. 
Lucius Back was the father of a large family and one of his sons, 
Boscius, married Harriet Cutler Bobbins and became the father of 
Mr. Harry Back. Boscius Back was in his younger days a member 
of the firm of Weld & Back, proprietors of a mattress factory and 
grist mill, and was a farmer and lumberman from 1864 until he 
retired in 1908. Until Boscius Back gave up the lumber business 
he owned hundreds of acres of timber in both Massachusetts and 
Connecticut, as well as extensive farm lands and other real estate. 
He has long been a prominent figure in state politics, being one of 
Connecticut's zealous Bepublicans. He represented the town of 
Union in the State Legislature of 1891-2, serving through the famous 
dead-lock session and being a member of the agricultural committee. 
He again represented his town in the Legislature of 1907, when he 
served upon the roads and bridges committee. He has been assessor, 
constable, tax collector and member of the local board of relief. He 
was clerk and treasurer of the Union Congregational Church for 
sixteen years. His wife, Harry E. Back's mother, was organist of 
that church for forty years and was a woman who took a leading part 
in social and religious activities and exerted a strong intellectual 
influence upon her son. 

371 



372 HARRY EUGENE BACK. 

Harry Eugene Back was born in the town of Union, Connecticut, 
on July 8th, 1869. In early boyhood he attended the Union common 
school and worked on his father's farm and in the lumber woods 
outside of school hours. Swinging an axe to cut wood and lumber 
and driving lumber teams made him fearless of hardships, prepared 
him for enduring life's rough places and taught him habits of 
self-reliance and industry. He prepared for college at the Hitchcock 
Free High School in Brimneld, Massachusetts, where he was gradu- 
ated in 1888. He inclined to historical and philosophical literature 
and showed a genius for composition and debating. He next attended 
the College of Liberal Arts of Boston University, where he received 
his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1892. Throughout his college course, 
Harry Back held a commanding position among his fellow students, 
being in his freshman year class secretary and associate editor of 
the national catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, in his sopho- 
more year the university reporter on the Boston Globe, class toast- 
master, and manager of the college paper, in his junior year business 
manager of the college annual, president of the University Debating 
Club, and a prominent fraternity man, and in his senior year editor- 
in-chief of the University Beacon, president of his fraternity chapter, 
and a member of the honorary literary society called the Monday 
Club. 

After graduating from college Mr. Back entered the newspaper 
field as a reporter on the Boston Globe, later as city editor of the 
New Hampshire Republican, then as telegraph editor of the same 
and as managing editor of the Worcester Evening Post he occupied 
the time until the fall of 1893, when he entered the Boston University 
Law School, where he accomplished the three years' course in two 
years, paying his tuition by working as a reporter on the Boston 
Globe. From the fall of 1895 to July, 1896, he was editor of the 
Lowell (Massachusetts) Mail. After this experience he returned 
home to Union and the following fall represented that town in the 
State Legislature. Acquaintances whom he made in the session of 
1897 urged him to open a law office in the borough of Danielson, 
town of Killingly, Windham County, Connecticut. He did so and 
was soon appointed prosecuting attorney for the town of Killingly, 
which office he held by re-appointment until May, 1901. In August, 
1897, he was appointed prosecuting agent for Windham County for 



HARRY EUGENE BACK. S73 

a term of two years. In April, 1899, he was appointed by Governor 
Lounsbury Commissioner of the Connecticut Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics for a term of four years. By the Legislature of 1901 he was 
appointed judge of the town court of Killingly for two years, 
being re-appointed by the succeeding legislatures and still holds this 
office. While in the legislature he drew up, introduced and was 
greatly instrumental in securing the passage of the bill creating the 
office of attorney-general. He is a member of the Republican State 
Central Committee from the Twenty-eighth Senatorial District. 

Since settling as a lawyer in Danielson, Mr. Back has built up 
an extensive corporation practice, especially in the line of street rail- 
way law. He has served as a director in the People's Tramway Com- 
pany, the Danielson and Norwich Street Railway Company, the 
Webster and Dudley Street Railway Company, and the Worcester 
and Webster Street Railway Company. He was one of the original 
directors as well as an organizer of the Thompson Tramway Com- 
pany, which afterwards became the Worcester and Connecticut Eastern 
Railway Company and still later the Consolidated Railway Company. 
He is active in all efforts for civic betterment in his community and 
is at present a burgess of the borough of Danielson, a director in 
the Danielson Y. M. C. A. and in the Danielson Free Public Library. 
From 1904 to 1909 he gave military service as a private in Com- 
pany M, Third Regiment Infantry, C. N. G. He is a member of 
the local Grange, the Order of Masons (Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council 
and Commandery), the Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Order of Elks, and the Bohemian Club. He is a member 
of the college fraternity of Beta Theta Pi. He is a member of the 
Congregational Church. He is a believer in outdoor exercise and 
particularly enjoys walking and fishing. 

A wife and two children constitute Mr. Back's family. Mrs. 
Back was Ella Davenport Hutchins previous to her marriage, which 
took place in January, 1902. The children are Samuel Hutchins, 
born in 1903, and Harry Eugene, Jr., born in 1904. Mrs. Back's 
father was the late Dr. Samuel Hutchins, one of the most skillful 
surgeons of this state in his day. Mr. Back's brother is Roscius 
Harlow Back, a distinguished lawyer who has practiced his profession 
with great success in Boston and in Vancouver, Washington. 

Life is made most successful, Mr. Back believes, by remembering 



374 HARRY EUGENE BACK. 

and preserving throughout the mature years "the pure ideals, the 
confidence in humanity, and the desire to aid mankind that we all 
possess in our youth." " The ambitions and philanthropies of youth 
should be realized and accomplished in maturity." As to methods, 
he adds, "Be intelligently systematic"; as to habits, "Work, work, 
work." 



FRANK J. RICE. 

RICE, FRANK J., mayor of New Haven and manager of the 
Hutchinson Apartments and the real estate business con- 
nected with the same in New Haven, is one of the prominent 
Republicans of that city and a former president of the New Haven 
Young Men's Republican Club. He was born in North Adams, 
Berkshire County, Massachusetts, on February 5th, 1869, the son of 
Jesse H. Rice, a farmer and a merchant who represented the town 
of Cheshire in the State Legislature of 1889 and who is now a resi- 
dent of New Haven. His mother's maiden name was Caroline E. 
liolbrook. 

Until he reached the age of fourteen Frank J. Rice lived and 
worked on his father's farm and attended the country schools in 
season. At the age of fourteen he entered the Yale Business College 
where he studied for one year. 

Leaving business college at the age of fifteen Frank J. Rice went 
to work as bookkeeper and foreman for H. B. Ives and Company, 
hardware manufacturers in New Haven, and he held this position 
from 1885 to 1890. The following year he was engaged in the 
grocery business and for several months of the year 1891 he was with 
Stevens and Brooks. He also spent two years and a half as con- 
ductor for the New Haven Street Railroad. 

Since 1893 Mr. Rice has been manager of the Hutchinson apart- 
ment house on College Street and has had charge of the real estate 
business connected with this well known apartment house. He has 
given much attention to city politics and has served two terms in the 
common council ; also served five years on the special tax commission. 
He was president of the New Haven Young Men's Republican Club 
for two years. He takes a keen interest in all public questions and 
is a consistent adherent of the Republican party. 

In religious belief Mr. Rice is a Methodist and he is a trustee 
of the First Methodist Church of New Haven. He is active in 
fraternal orders, being a member of Wooster Lodge of Masons, 

377 



378 FRANK J. RICE. 

Eelief Lodge of Odd Fellows, and American Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. 

On the sixteenth day of July, 1890, Mr. Kice married 
Charlotte A. Watrous. Their home is at 18 College Street, New 
Haven, and they have two children, Eussell L. and Mancel W. 

Frank J. Rice is the present mayor of the city of New Haven, 
having been elected to that important office October 4th, 1909. 




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GEORGE MARSHALL CLARK. 

CLARK, GEORGE MARSHALL, the late, ex-Senator, manu- 
facturer, inventor, and president of the Cutaway Harrow 
Company of Higganum, Connecticut, was born in Haddam, 
Middlesex County, Connecticut, June 11th, 1833, and died there 
March 2d, 1908. He was a son of George Washington and Cynthia 
(Selden) Clark, the latter a daughter of Captain Thomas Selden 
who served in the War of 1812. On the maternal side his earliest 
American ancestor was William Clark, an original proprietor in 
Hartford in 1639. He was also one of twenty-eight men, who, in 
the summer of 1662, settled in what was then known as " the lands 
of thirty-mile island," subsequently named Haddam. 

George M. Clark's father owned considerable quarry property on 
Haddam Neck, and was a large contractor for government and 
city work at New York, Newport, and other places, furnishing 
Connecticut River stone, known as Haddam stone. He was very 
enterprising, energetic, and successful, but died when he was but 
forty years old in the year 1845, when his son, George M. Clark was 
was but twelve years old. From that time George M. Clark was 
obliged to leave the district school and engage with his elder brother, 
Thomas Jefferson, in the support of the family. Since the age 
of nine he had been actively at work on the farm when not at 
school, and for about two years following his father's death he was 
employed doing odd jobs for the neighboring farmers, all his wages 
being turned over to his mother. He then worked at wool carding, 
and subsequently, for seventeen months, at blaeksmithing and the 
making of edged tools. 

At the age of seventeen Mr. Clark made his first trip to 
Savannah, Georgia, where he worked as a common hand with the 
darkies in a sawmill. One day the main shaft of the mill broke, 
which meant a long and expensive period of idleness. In this crisis 
the knowledge and skill of Mr. Clark prevented a shut down of the 
mill by welding the shaft. Through this act he was given the 

381 



382 



GEORGE MARSHALL CLARK. 



contract for the erection of three large steam sawmills in Georgia, 
which within five months were sawing more than 400,000 feet of 
pine daily, and which mills he completed before he was eighteen. 
Earlier than this he had formed a partnership with his elder 
brother, who was a stone mason, and they continued as Clark Brothers 
for over thirty years. They were associated in business practically all 
their lives. 

For about ten years George M. Clark carried on ship building 
in summer and house carpentering in winter, working from Bangor 
to New Orleans. When he started on his first trip he had but 
fourteen dollars in his pocket, but during the winter he was able to 
send two hundred dollars in gold to his mother, and added two 
hundred and fifty dollars to it in the spring. His motto was : " What 
I will to do I can do," and this spirit brought to him, as it will bring 
to all others, its full reward. 

In the fall of 1859 Mr. Clark engaged with a Meriden cutlery 
firm as a journeyman carpenter at one dollar and seventy-five cents a 
day, but within a couple of days, the head man, Aaron Collins, dis- 
covered his ability, and at the next meeting Mr. Clark was made 
foreman of all the outside men at a salary of ten dollars a day. 
Always considering his family, Mr. Clark soon obtained employment 
for his elder brother and the two were engaged for seven years 
with the Meriden company. 

Meanwhile Mr. Clark had turned his attention to the improv- 
ment of agricultural implements, and in the fall of 1867 he and his 
brother began the erection of a factory at Higganum, which marked 
the beginning of the important manufacturing industry which for 
more than forty years has been carried on with constantly increasing 
output under his direction. Upon the completion of this small 
original factory, Clark Brothers engaged in the manufacture of 
mowing machines, for which George M. Clark had invented a new 
mechanical movement. At the beginning a stock company was 
formed, called the Higganum Manufacturing Company, of which 
original company and its successors George M. Clark was president, 
filling this office continuously until his death, March 2d, 1908. His 
brother, Thomas J. Clark, was secretary and treasurer, and later 
became vice-president, which office he has filled continuously until the 
present time, 1910. 

In the middle of the eighties Mr. Clark invented the famous 



GEORGE MARSHALL CLARK. 383 

" Cutaway " disc, which proved to be so far superior to any other 
form of disc that he patented it, and also the harrow in which it 
was used. Eecognizing the great value of this invention, the com- 
pany immediately began manufacturing it and placed the original 
cutaway harrow on the market in 1886. After the lapse of five years 
the output consisted almost entirely of cutaways, and the present 
company was organized, August 19th, 1891, under a name more in 
keeping with the nature of their product, as the Cutaway Harrow 
Company. The first officers of the new company were: George M. 
Clark, president; Thomas J. Clark, vice-president; and Clinton B. 
Davis, secretary and treasurer. 

Probably the most important machine that Mr. Clark invented 
was the double action harrow, which has had an enormous sale in 
this and foreign countries, two-thirds of the present output being 
of this pattern. 

Not only was Mr. Clark intimately known from one end of the 
land to the other through his improved agricultural implements, but 
as a writer and specialist in the raising of grass he was one of the 
scientific agricultural experts of the country, and known as the 
" Grass King." He removed sixteen thousand tons of rock from a 
field of sixteen acres, and then raised a hundred tons of hay annually 
from that field, whereas sixteen tons of hay was all that could be 
raised on seventy-five acres of another farm nearby which was not 
improved by Mr. Clark in the same way. 

In 1856 Mr. Clark aided in the organization of the Republican 
party in Connecticut, to which faith he remained consistently devoted 
during his life, and he was the leader of his party in his section 
of the state. For many years he represented his town and district 
in the House and Senate, where he was chairman of important com- 
mittees: such as committee on incorporations, three terms; new 
towns and probate districts, two terms; contingent expenses, five 
terms ; and he was an active and very important member of the 
insurance committee. In 1885 he introduced fourteen bills to reform 
the methods of the fire insurance companies doing business in this 
state, and during the contest he was on the witness stand seventeen 
days, standing out against the power wielded by millions of capital, 
and the skill and brains of the most expensive legal talent, in his 
effort to make the companies pay the full amount for which the 
property was insured. For forty-six years Mr. Clark was a member 



884 GEORGE MARSHALL CLARK. 

of the town committee. A Eepublican in a Democratic town, his 
popularity was so great as to secure his election to the legislature 
repeatedly. Mr. Clark was elected a delegate from the town of 
Haddam to the Constitutional Convention held in Hartford in 
January, 1903. 

Mr. Clark was a member of Columbia Lodge, No. 25, A. F. 
and A. M., of Haddam; a charter member of Granite Lodge, No. 119, 
of Haddam; a member of Burning Bush Chapter, No. 29, E. A. M., 
of Essex; and of Cyrene Commandery, No. 8, K. T., of Middletown. 
He was a lifelong member of the Congregational Church Society at 
Higganum. He contributed freely to the maintenance of this church, 
and was a help to every good cause, to the churches, the schools, to 
everything that was a help to mankind, to aid them to become useful, 
intelligent, and honest citizens. 

On August 26th, 1860, George M. Clark was married to 
Clementine Isabel, daughter of Edwin B. Bonfoey of Haddam, and 
they had four children : (1) Estelle Eugenia was born September 17th, 
1864, and on February 15th, 1888, she was united in marriage with 
Clement S. Hubbard of Middletown, who is now, in 1910, secretary 
and treasurer of the Cutaway Harrow Company. (2) Harriet 
Cynthia, born January 3d, 1869; died February 25th, 1873. 

(3) Clementine Dolly, born August 26th, 1871, who, on September 
14th, 1892, married Elmer S. Hubbard, president of the Cutaway 
Harrow Company, and younger brother of Clement S. Hubbard. 

(4) Isabel, twin sister of Clementine Dolly, died June 25, 1872. 
Mrs. George M. Clark, who survives him, is a descendant of an 

old Huguenot family, and is a great granddaughter of Benanuel 
Bonfoey (2), a Revolutionary soldier, who was the son of 
Benanuel (1), the famous soldier of the French and Indian Wars. 
They lived in Haddam and with the other members of the family 
they were the most active, enterprising, and public-spirited citizens 
of the community. Practically without exception the members of the 
family were long-lived, exceedingly sane and sensible, and with strong 
characters, which nothing could swerve from the strict path of duty. 
Mrs. Clark's grandfather and father were noted ship caulkers, whose 
work was always such as to safeguard the lives of " those who go 
down to the sea in ships." Mrs. Clark's mother was Harriet Cotton, 
daughter of Samuel Cotton, who was a lineal descendant of the 
famous divine, Rev. John Cotton. 



ELMER STEPHEN HUBBARD. 

HUBBAED, ELMER STEPHEN, president of the Cutaway 
Harrow Company, of Higganum, Connecticut, was born at 
Middletown, Connecticut, March 23, 1865. He is a son 
of Samuel J. and Frances D. (Smith) Hubbard. His father was a 
farmer and lumberman, assessor, district treasurer, and, in 1877-1878, 
represented his town in the lower house of the State Legislature. 
The family is descended from Stephen Hopkins who came over in 
the Mayflower. 

Elmer S. Hubbard's early life was spent on a farm and in the 
lumbering business with his father, where he learned the dignity 
of labor, and the valuable lesson that all true achievement comes 
from patient and persistent labor intelligently directed toward any 
desired end. The influence of his mother, although she passed away 
when he was but eleven years old, has been strong upon him. He was 
also greatly influenced by reading the lives of great men, and by 
learning how they secured advancement in the competitive battle 
which every man and every woman must fight for himself or herself. 

That these lessons were well learned is shown by his advance- 
ment early in life to a position at the head of one of the largest manu- 
facturing establishments in the State, whose products are furnished 
to every State in the Union and to other countries as well. The 
history of the birth and growth of this concern is more fully told 
elsewhere, but under the presidency of Mr. Hubbard, who devotes 
himself so assiduously to its welfare, its prosperity will continue 
and increase. 

Elmer S. Hubbard's school education was received in the public 
schools of Middletown, but as indicated above his actual education 
was in the school of experience, and that which was obtained by his 
own efforts. He began the active work of life on the farm, and in 
1899 entered the service of the Cutaway Harrow Company, to the 
presidency of which he was elected in August, 1908, succeeding the 
late George M. Clark. He has shown himself well fitted to be the 

387 



388 ELMER STEPHEN HUBBARD. 

executive head of such a large establishment, and the business has 
grown rapidly under his management. 

Mr. Hubbard is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, a mem- 
ber of the Republican party, and of the Congregational Church. 

On September 14, 1892, Elmer S. Hubbard was married to 
Clementine D. Clark, daughter of the late George M. Clark, and they 
have two children: Beverly Raymond, born December 27, 1901, and 
Dolly Bonfoey, born October 3, 1904. 



CLEMENT SAMUEL HUBBARD. 

HUBBARD, CLEMENT SAMUEL, is the secretary and treas- 
urer of the Cutaway Harrow Company, of the Higganum 
Savings Bank, and of the Higganum Hardware Company, 
and in many other ways is a prominent citizen of the town of Hig- 
ganum, Middlesex County, Connecticut. He was born in Middletown 
on June 20th, 1862, the elder son of Samuel J. and Frances D. 
Hubbard. His father was a farmer and lumberman who represented 
Middletown in the State Legislature of 1877-1878. Through him 
Mr. Hubbard is descended from one of New England's oldest and 
most honorable families, founded in this country by George Hubbard, 
who was born in England in 1601 and came to New England in his 
early manhood and was one of the original settlers of Hartford in 
1639. His descendants have been substantial New England citizens 
for two hundred and fifty years and made a remarkable record in 
the War of the Bevolution, more than five hundred of their number 
having served in that war. Later generations have been industrial 
leaders and foremost manufacturers in various cities of Connecticut 
and Massachusetts, notably in Meriden and Middletown. 

A farm-bred boy, Clement S. Hubbard learned lessons of thor- 
ough, persistent industry in early youth. Equally strong foundation 
was laid for his moral and spiritual life by the noble influence and 
example of his good mother. He was educated in the Middletown 
public schools, where he pursued his studies with earnest diligence, 
particularly those connected with mechanical engineering, a prophecy 
of his future career as a manufacturer. 

After working with his father at farming and lumbering for a 
number of years, Clement Hubbard entered the employ of the Cuta- 
way Harrow Company of Higganum in February, 1888. His position 
was that of receiving clerk and it was his duty to receive and inspect 
all stock and material used in the business. In climbing from this 
starting point through all the intermediate stages of the industry of 
manufacturing farm implements to the position of secretary and 

391 



392 CLEMENT SAMUEL HUBBARD. 

treasurer, Mr. Hubbard has mastered and managed the work of every 
department from receiving the raw material to shipping the finished 
goods. He became secretary and treasurer of the Cutaway Harrow 
Company on February 27th, 1904. He has been secretary and treas- 
urer of the Higganum Hardware Company, makers of nippers, cutting 
pliers, knife grinders, etc., since April 17th, 1899. He has been 
secretary and treasurer of the Higganum Savings Bank since 
December 31st, 1888. 

These many and strong business interests leave Mr. Hubbard 
little time for political offices, though he is a loyal Eepublican and 
keenly interested in the success of that party. He once served as 
assessor for the town of Haddam. He is a member of the Congre- 
gational Church, of the Patriarchs Militant, I. 0. 0. F., of the 
National Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and of the Order of Masons, 
in which he has attained to the thirty-second degree. Yachting and 
motoring are his favorite forms of recreation. He believes that young 
people should have steady employment at some useful work, good 
habits and sufficient outdoor recreation to keep them healthy and 
active. If these things are looked after in youth he believes success 
in later life is guaranteed. 

Mr. Hubbard's family consists of a wife and two sons. Mrs. 
Hubbard was Estella Eugenia Clark, daughter of the late Hon. George 
M. Clark and Clementine Bonfoey Clark of Higganum, and the date 
of their marriage was February 15th, 1888. One child, Frances 
Estella, born in 1889, died in 1892. The two now living are George 
Marshall, born in 1890, and Clement Samuel, Jr., born in 1895. 
George graduated from the Higganum Union School in 1904, being 
class valedictorian. In September, 1904, he entered Williston Semi- 
nary in Easthampton, Massachusetts, from which he was graduated 
in 1908, again being valedictorian and also receiving the appointment 
of " Yale Scholar," the highest honor given by the school. He is 
now the advertising manager of the Cutaway Harrow Company. His 
brother is a member of the Class of 1913 at the Middletown High 
School. 



ilpfp 8 ^ 





FEANK BRAINERD. 

BRAINERD, FRANK, was born October 23, 1854, on the site 
of the old Brainerd homestead at Portland, now destroyed 
by excavations for stone in the quarry business. His early 
education was pursued in the common school in Portland, at the old 
Stone school, and then he was sent to Cheshire Academy, at that 
time one of the best educational institutions of the locality, and, 
indeed, in all New England. After two years there he went to 
Phillips Academy at Exeter, N. H., graduating in the class of 1873, 
after which he entered Harvard College, where he remained to finish 
his junior year, and then left to enter business. Eventually, in April, 
1877, he entered the employ of Brainerd & Company, acting as first 
measurer in the quarry, this being the begi nnin g of a career in which 
Mr. Brainerd has filled various positions of responsibility in and 
about the quarry. In 1891, he became treasurer of what was then 
the Brainerd Quarry Company, it having been incorporated as such 
in 1884. In 1896, when the Brainerd, Shaler & Hall Company was 
formed, and consolidated two properties, Mr. Brainerd became the 
vice-president and is filling that position at present. 

On October 8, 1879, Mr. Brainerd wedded Miss Ida Gillum, of 
Hartford, a native of Portland, and a daughter of Henry Hobart and 
Isabella (Gildersleeve) Gillum. The children born of this union 
are: George Gillum, born July 10, 1880, is a graduate of the High 
School of Portland, of St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and also 
of Harvard University, class of 1901; Amelia, born May 22, 1882, 
died July 14, 1887; and Frank Judson, born October 26, 1888. 

Although Mr. Brainerd is a staunch Republican, he has no desire 
for public recognition, his varied business and social duties occupying 
his time and attention. For many years he has been a vestryman 
and treasurer in Trinity Episcopal Church, in which the Brainerd 
family has been a tower of strength; is a director in the Portland 
National Bank and a trustee in the Freestone Savings Co. Socially 
he is connected with the Sons of the Revolution, and the Harvard 
Club of New York. 

15 395 



WILLIAM ROGER TYLER. 

TYLEB, the late WILLIAM BOGEB, was a well-known 
merchant of New Haven, in which city he was born on 
April 8, 1850. He died in the prime of life, on September 
25, 1907, at his summer home in Pine Orchard, Connecticut. He 
was the son of Morris Tyler, the wholesale rubber and leather 
merchant, former mayor of New Haven and lieutenant-governor of 
Connecticut, who married Mary Butler, to whom their son, William 
Eoger Tyler, was indebted for some of the best influences ever exerted 
upon his life. Mr. Tyler's paternal great-great-grandfather was 
an early settler of Saybrook, Connecticut, being Jonathan Tyler by 
name. His paternal great-grandfather, Eoger Tyler, was a native 
of Branford, Connecticut, as was also his paternal grandfather, 
Malachi Tyler. Mr. Tyler's maternal great-grandfather was Ezekiel 
Butler of Branford, and his maternal grandfather was Ezekiel Butler 
of Hudson, New York. 

New Haven has always given excellent educational advantages 
to her boys and William Eoger Tyler received a good education at 
the Webster School and the Hillhouse High School. He graduated 
from the latter in 1867 and immediately afterward entered business 
as a clerk in his father's mercantile concern, Morris Tyler and 
Company, rubber and leather merchants. He remained in the whole- 
sale rubber and leather business the rest of his life and became senior 
partner in the business after his father's death in 1876. 

Outside of the mercantile business Mr. Tyler had a number of 
important business interests in New Haven. He was a director in 
the New Haven County National Bank, the New Haven Water 
Company, the Security Insurance Company of New Haven, and a 
trustee of the New Haven Savings Bank. He took a lively interest 
in the city's growth and prosperity along both industrial and civic 
lines, and contributed most liberally to charity. 

In politics Mt. Tyler united with the Eepublican party. In 
religious belief he was a Congregationalist. He carried his creed 

396 




'/'/>&■/'■■ 



WILLIAM ROGER TYLER. 

into his business life, which was actuated by high moral and Christian 
ideals. He believed that success depends on " every thought and 
deed being prompted by right and truth and carried out in a straight- 
forward manner," and that " the helping of unfortunates is one of 
the truest kinds of Christianity." Although a member of the 
Quinnipiack and Country Clubs of New Haven he was essentially a 
home man and devoted his time almost exclusively to his family. He 
was a hearty advocate of out-door sports and took special pleasure in 
riding and driving good horses. 

Mr. Tyler is survived by a wife, Sarah A. Pierpont, whom he 
married June 17, 1873, and four children, Eoger Pierpont, William 
Butler, Eleanor Prances and Zaida Pierpont. 



JOHN MILTON GREIST, ESQ. 

GREIST, JOHN MILTON, the late president, treasurer, 
general manager and owner of the Greist Manufacturing Com- 
pany of New Haven, noted inventor, among the most enter- 
prising and successful of Connecticut's many manufacturers and 
one of the men who added greatly to the beauties of the beautiful 
Elm City, was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, May 9, 1850. 

He was the son of Joseph W. and Ruthanna Greist, whose ances- 
tors were counted among the worthy and sturdy Friends, whose 
ability, industry and thrift made the State of Pennsylvania and 
maintain its prestige as the second commonwealth in the Union. 
The father had the spirit of the pioneer and did not tarry in the 
Hoosier State, but pushed across the continent, where he died in 
1859 in the gold fields of California. 

The boyhood of John M. Greist was spent in the country, in the 
healthy, invigorating life of the great Middle West. His education, 
so far as schooling is concerned, was secured in district schools of 
the country during the winters, but his real education was self obtained 
through exceptionally wide and wisely directed reading and through 
the active operation of a seer's mind which was always investigating 
and reflecting. 

Industry, energy and concentration steadily applied to stated 
tasks were not only inculcated by the precept and example of the 
beautiful life of the typical old Quaker lady whom he called "Mother" 
and whose strong influence for good followed him as long as he lived, 
but the death of his father caused him to do from his eleventh year 
mature work and to assume a man's responsibilities. 

As a boy he was resourceful and cheerful in coping with trials 
and disappointments, and the optimistic spirit thus developed was 
one of the most attractive and fruitful elements of his mature per- 
sonality. 

In 1865, when he was but fifteen years old, Mr. Greist began 
selling sewing machines in Plainfield, Indiana, taking his first lessons 

400 



JOHN MILTON GEEIST. 403 

in this particular field of human helpfulness in which during the 
remainder of his life he was to play such an important part. Five 
years later, in 1870, he first began the manufacture of sewing machine 
attachments in a small room over a butcher's shop in Delavan, Illinois. 
He soon removed to Chicago, where, under the firm name of J. M. 
Greist & Company, he continued the manufacture of attachments, 
conducted a general business in sewing machine supplies, and devoted 
much of his time and inborn inventive ingenuity to the invention of 
additional labor saving devices to be used in connection with sewing 
machines. 

But he did not limit his productiveness entirely to this field; 
for it was about this time that he originated and patented the first 
known means of duplicating or multiplying pen-written manuscripts, 
letters and drawings in such a way that large numbers could be 
produced quickly and economically. This invention he successfully 
defended in a suit against Thomas A. Edison. Another interesting 
and important basic patent which he secured about this time covered 
the production of studs used as rivets, which studs were forced up 
from the surface of the material to be riveted. 

The rapidly increasing demand for his sewing-machine attach- 
ments brought about such a growth as to require concentration of 
effort upon these products, and the general sewing machine supply 
trade was discontinued in order that he might give himself entirely 
to the manufacture of the attachments under the name of the Chicago 
Attachment Company. 

About 1883 Mr. Greist produced and patented some important 
and valuable patents on sewing machine rufSers, tuckers and hemmers, 
which patents he sold to the Singer Manufacturing Company. The 
next three years were spent in research and invention on buttonhole 
attachments, which again brought a valuable contract with the Singer 
Manufacturing Company. In 1886 he moved to Bayonne, New 
Jersey, to take charge of the attachment department of the Singer 
Manufacturing Company, where he remained until 1889, when he 
removed to New Haven to work alone with larger freedom as his own 
employer. Within a short time he organized a company known as 
J. M. Greist & Company, but after a year or so he moved to Westville 
and there started business as The Greist Manufacturing Company. 
By hard work and application to business, Mr. Greist rapidly and 



404 



JOHN MILTON GBEIST. 



steadily built up his trade, and in spite of the fact that the great value 
of bis patents invited infringements he vigorously protected his rights 
through lawsuits against the trespassers, and the company prospered 
as only a company so situated can ever prosper. Mr. Greist secured 
nearly one hundred patents and originated many other inventions and 
these formed the foundation and superstructure of the present estab- 
lishment. The articles manufactured by this company are supplied 
to every sewing machine manufacturer in this country and to most 
of those in Europe. 

John M. Greist was very fond of athletics and was interested in 
riding, driving and baseball. He did much toward the success of the 
old Edgewood Baseball Club, which was one of the most prominent 
among the clubs of the state. Aside from his inventions and business, 
Mr. Greist was always most interested in current events and politics, 
and though he took no active part in political life or other public 
affairs, he was an earnest Eepublican and a vice-president of the 
Union League Club. 

When he went to Westville the place had but few inhabitants, 
but he gave profitable employment to a great many people in con- 
stantly increasing numbers as addition after addition was made to his 
factories until at present nearly eight hundred persons are employed 
in them. In this and in many other ways Mr. Greist was a public 
benefactor of far greater worth than many another who appeared 
more prominently before the public. Kindly, just, conscientious, 
generous, he was held in high esteem by all. 

In August, 1870, John M. Greist was married to Sarah Edwina 
Murdock, to whose wifely co-operation in the early years a large 
measure of his success must be attributed. She died August 14, 1897. 
Pour children were bom to them, three of whom are now living; 
Percy Eaymond Greist, who is president and general manager of the 
Greist Manufacturing Company ; Charlotte Kuthanna Greist, who has 
spent some years studying music abroad; and Hubert Milton Greist, 
who was graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School, Yale Uni- 
versity, in 1905, and who is now secretary and superintendent of the 
Greist Manufacturing Company. 

October 10, 1899, John M. Greist married Miss Mary Fife 
Woods, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who survives his death, which 
occurred February 23, 1906. 



JOHN MILTON GEEIST. 405 

Mr. Greist was a true lover of nature, and reveled in the great 
out-of-doors. In 1901 after building his beautiful home, " Marvel- 
wood," in Westville, Connecticut, he became interested in gradually 
acquiring much of the woodland adjacent; and during 1903 and 
1904 he had secured in one tract seven hundred acres, which he 
enclosed, leaving foot gates that anyone who desired might enter and 
enjoy the freedom of this magnificent forest, where roads were built, 
beautiful walks made among flowers, ferns and rocky streams, and 
where fishes, birds, rabbits and squirrels flourish unmolested as in 
their native haunts. This was but one of many loving services to 
his fellow men. 



CHARLES HENRY TIBBITS. 

TIBBITS, CHARLES HENRY, manufacturer, member of the 
Connecticut Legislature, and one of the most prominent lay- 
men of the Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Connecticut, 
is a resident of Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut. He 
was born in White Plains, Westchester County, New York, on Janu- 
ary 30th, 1866, the son of William B. and Prances E. Johnson 
Tibbits. His father was one of the leading men in the town, an 
insurance man, a bank officer and a leader in all town affairs. His 
mother was a woman of strong and beautiful character and hers was 
the best influence ever exerted upon his life. Through these worthy 
parents Mr. Tibbits is descended from old French and Dutch families. 

Born and brought up on a farm, Charles H. Tibbits received 
very healthy influences in early boyhood and laid the foundation of 
a vigorous, wholesome, active manhood. He attended Harrington's 
School in Westchester, New York, where he prepared for college. 
He then entered Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where 
he was graduated with the degree of B. A. in 1887. 

The autumn after his graduation from Trinity, Mr. Tibbits 
became a teacher of Latin in St. Margaret's School in Waterbury, 
where he taught for two years. He then gave up teaching to enter 
the manufacturing business. From 1894 to 1898 he was secretary 
of the Simpson, Hall, Miller & Company, of Wallingford, Conn. 
In 1898 he was elected manager of Factory " L " of the International 
Silver Company. In 1907 he was elected third vice-president of 
the International Silver Company, his present office. He is vice- 
president of the First National Bank of Wallingford. 

During the past ten years of his residence in Wallingford, Mr. 
Tibbits has been a zealous promoter of local improvements and has 
frequently held town offices. He has been a member of the court 
of burgesses, treasurer of the electric light commission, and warden 
of Wallingford. He is at present state representative from Walling- 

406 



CHARLES HENRY TIBBITS. 409 

ford (1907-1909) and he is chairman of the committee on education. 
He is a Kepublican in his political allegiance. 

Mr. Tibbits is one of the most active, loyal and influential lay 
workers in the Protestant Episcopal Church in this diocese and 
frequently uses his scholarly talents in behalf of causes connected with 
the Church. Outside of church and political affiliations he has the 
following ties: Membership in the Psi TJpsilon Fraternity, the 
Graduate Club of New Haven, and the Union League Club of New 
Haven. He is an enthusiastic outdoor man and enjoys tennis, golf 
and motoring as ideal recreations. 

On November 20th, 1890, Mr. Tibbits married Georgiana S. 
Hull. Mr. and Mrs. Tibbits have two children, Margaret E. and 
Charles H., Junior. Their home is at 245 North Main Street, 
Wallingford, Conn. 

From his own experience in life Mr. Tibbits deduces the following 
advice for the training of young men and women. " Let them be 
democratic in ideas and tenacious of purpose. Let them be educated 
in the public schools, where, more than anywhere else, is found the 
true idea of democracy. The thought that each child is on an equal 
footing with every other child engenders a healthy American spirit. 
Above all let them be thoroughly imbued with the present day neces- 
sity of a good education in our high schools and colleges. There never 
was a time in our history when higher education was such a necessary 
adjunct to a successful career, whether professional or business, as 
at the present. With a sound education as a basis, a healthy ambition 
to make the most of every opportunity, and a truly democratic idea 
pervading all their actions, the highest ideal of American citizenship 
and motherhood will be attained and the future safety of our country 
is assured." 



JAMES THOMAS MORAN, ESQ. 

MOKAN, JAMES THOMAS, one of the foremost lawyers and 
business men of New Haven, was born at North Haven, 
Connecticut, September 19th, 1864, the son of Thomas and 
Maria (Cullorn) Moran. His father was a farmer in North Haven, 
but entered mercantile life as a grocer in New Haven when James 
was five years old, since which age James has always lived in New 
Haven. 

He received his early education in the New Haven grammar 
schools and was graduated from the Hillhouse High School of New 
Haven in 1883, and from Yale Law School in 1884 with the degree 
of LL.B., and the graduate degree of M.L. in 1885. He began the 
practice of law in 1884 in New Haven in the office of Piatt, Tyler 
& Colby, which firm was succeeded by Tyler, Ingersoll & Moran, of 
which he was a partner. Through his intimate association with the 
late Morris F. Tyler, president of the Southern New England Tele- 
phone Company, which continued for twenty-four years, from 1883 
to Mr. Tyler's death in 1907, he, in 1884, took up the legal work of 
the telephone business in Connecticut. He was for years general 
attorney for the company, was made a director in 1907, and vice- 
president and general attorney in 1908. 

Next to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Eailroad Com- 
pany, the Southern New England Telephone Company is the largest 
and most powerful corporation in Connecticut, and, in smoothing the 
innumerable legal wrinkles which necessarily arise, during the many 
years which have elapsed from the birth to the maturity of such a com- 
pany, Mr. Moran has demonstrated ability of the very highest order. 
For the company comes into such close personal touch with every 
citizen and sojourner in the state; it is so interwoven with the daily 
lives of all the people from the highest to the lowest ; so indispensable 
in expediting the transaction of all business affairs; so essential to 
social life; it brings all the people of the state so closely together in 
friendly and neighborly personal intercourse; it spreads its numerous 

410 



JAMES THOMAS MORAN. 413 

branches from the central stem at New Haven through the cities 
and towns to remote farmhouses, like arteries from the heart, or 
like nerves from the brain — to have safely and smoothly guided the 
course of such a growth is no small achievement. It is not strange 
that such a man should be in demand elsewhere, and, responding to 
such calls, Mr. Moran's broad legal scholarship and unerring business 
judgment have gained for him official preferment in many of the 
most important corporations of New Haven. Since 1891 he has 
been president of the New Haven Union Company, which publishes 
the most largely circulated newspaper in the city. He is a trustee 
of the Connecticut Savings Bank, a director of the Merchant's 
National Bank, of the National Folding Box and Paper Company, 
and of the Acme Wire Company. His public spirit and unselfish 
patriotism have been manifested during all his life. From 1886 to 
1909 he held non-paying municipal offices in New Haven : three years 
as councilman, one year as president of the board of councilmen;* 
three years as director in the public library; three years as police 
commissioner; and sixteen years, from 1893 to 1909, as member of the 
board of education. 

In politics Mr. Moran is a Democrat and has taken an active 
part in the management of several state campaigns. Socially he is a 
member of the Graduates' Club, the Knights of St. Patrick, and the 
Yale Club of New York. In religion he is a member of the Koman 
Catholic Church, and is a trustee of Saint Francis Orphan Asylum 
of New Haven. 

He thoroughly enjoys healthful outdoor sports, and takes much 
pleasure in attendance at college games. 

He has offices in the First National Bank Building and with the 
Southern New England Telephone Company. His home is at 221 
Sherman Avenue. 

On April 27th, 1898, James T. Moran was married to Miss Mary 
E. McKenzie, daughter of James and Catherine McKenzie. Two 
children were born to them, of whom one, Helen, is now living, aged 
eight years. 



HENRY CLINTON ATWOOD. 

ATWOOD, HENRY CLINTON, manufacturer, president and 
treasurer of the Williamsville Manufacturing Company of 
Williamsville, town of Killingly, Windham County, Connecti- 
cut, where he was born on February 12th, 1856. He is directly 
descended from Harmon Atwood who came from England to Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1642 and appears on the records as a member of an 
artillery company in 1644 and as a freeman in 1645. His wife was 
Ann Copp who came to America in the ship " Blessing " in 1635. 
John Atwood, son of Harmon and Ann, was a deacon and a lieutenant 
of artillery, and his son John, Mr. H. C. Atwood's great-great-grand- 
father, was a sergeant in the Kevolution. Mr. Atwood's grandfather, 
also named John Atwood, was the first of the family to engage in 
manufacturing, being one of the owners of a mill in 1849. Mr. 
Atwood's parents were William Allen and Caroline Hargraves Atwood. 
His father was a manufacturer in Williamsville and a stockholder in 
the big mills at Taftville. 

After due preparation at the Friends' Grammar School and the 
University Grammar School of Providence, Henry C. Atwood entered 
Brown University, where he was graduated in 1878. The following 
fall he entered the store of the Williamsville Company, where he 
worked for three years. 

In 1881 Mr. Atwood was made agent and superintendent of 
the Williamsville Manufacturing Company and since 1890 he has been 
treasurer as well. The Company has a large and complete plant for 
the extensive manufacture of cotton shirtings and is recognized as 
a leading Connecticut industry. It is known not only for the high 
grade and great quantity of the goods manufactured but also for its 
up-to-date equipment and for the harmonious relations of employer 
and employees, all of which facts are largely due to Mr. Atwood's 
ability, sagacity, justice and broad-mindedness. 

In 1884 Mr. Atwood represented Killingly in the State Legisla- 
ture and during his term of office he was a member of the Committee 

414 




'mm 



y ff#0ff/y",'!. 




t-fr-^c^ 



HENRY CLINTON ATWOOD. 417 

on New Towns and Probate Districts and of the Special Committee 
on Boiler Inspection. He has always adhered to the Eepublican party 
in politics. 

Mr. Atwood is a member of the society of the Sons of the 
American Eevolution, of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, A. P. and A. M., of 
Warren Chapter, No. 12, E. A. M., and of Montgomery Council, No. 
2, E. and S. M. His chief interests, outside of business affairs, are 
public matters and these fraternal ties, is in educational progress. 

In October, 1878, Mr. Atwood married Miss Lillian B. Whitford, 
of Providence, Ehode Island. Two sons born of this marriage are 
both living, Clinton W. and Harold Bradford. The family home is 
at Williamsville. 



CHARLES A. GATES. 



GATES, HON. CHARLES A., state senator and well-known 
official of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
at Willimantic, is as prominent in fraternal circles as he is 
in town, county, and state politics. Though he has been a resident 
of Willimantic, Windham County, Connecticut, most of the time since 
1888, he was born in Mifflin Township, Richland County, Ohio, and 
received his education in that state, so that he has been well called 
" a product of the Middle West." The date of his birth was August 
22d, 1867. He passed in due course of time through the public 
schools of his native town and then took a course in a business col- 
lege in Mansfield, Ohio. 

While seeking a suitable business career, after completing his 
schooling, Charles A. Gates did not "go West to grow up with the 
country " but came instead to Connecticut in April, 1888, and located 
in Willimantic. His first position was as baggage master and clerk 
with the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. At that time 
the so-called " modern " expansion of the railroad was beginning 
and the company was not only straining every nerve to make its 
equipment equal the constantly increasing demands of the public 
and of commerce in general, but was eagerly looking for capable men 
worthy of advancement. It was not long before Mr. Gates' diligence 
and ability won official recognition and in 1891 he was made a 
station agent. He acted in this capacity at Franklin, Massachusetts, 
at Waterbury, Connecticut, and at Southbridge, Massachusetts, and 
finally at Willimantic. He received the last named appointment in 
March, 1895, and held it until January, 1907, when he was promoted 
to the position of general agent of the freight department. His expe- 
riences and training as station agent were excellent preparation for 
the political career for which he was destined, as it brought him into 
close touch with the public and developed his natural tact in dealing 
with all sorts of people in all sorts of moods and walks of life. A 
station agent learns to know human nature and as his dealings with 

418 



CHARLES A. GATES. 421 

people demand both courtesy and firmness a forceful personality and 
broad-mindedness are sure to result and these are essential to success 
in politics. 

In 1899 and 1901 Mr. Gates represented the town of Windham 
in the State Legislature and served with great credit on the finance 
committee and as chairman of the committee on contingent expenses. 
In 1902 and 1903 he was councilman-at-large in Willimantic and 
served as a member of several of the important committees of the 
city government. In 1903 he represented the Seventeenth District, 
serving as senate chairman of the committee on excise and contingent 
expenses. In 1907 he was again elected to represent the old Seven- 
teenth, now the Twenty-ninth District, and served on the committee 
on cities and boroughs and on the committee on fisheries and game. 
As a senator he gave the same faithful and efficient work he had 
done for his state as representative. Since 1901 Mr. Gates has been 
a member of the Eepublican State Central Committee. 

When the Horseshoe Park Agricultural Association was organ- 
ized in April, 1902, Mr. Gates was made president and he still holds 
this office. He has many strong fraternal ties and is a member of 
Natchaug Lodge No. 22, Knights of Pythias, an order which comes 
very close to his heart. He was grand chancellor of the order in the 
State Grand Lodge in 1904-1905 and he has also been treasurer. He 
is a member and past grand of Obwebetuck Lodge No. 16, I. 0. O. F., 
Putnam Lodge No. 574, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and Border Grange, No. 93. His popularity in fraternal life is due 
to the same qualities as is his success in public life, — straightfor- 
wardness, geniality, faithfulness, zeal, and uprightness in fulfilling 
all duties, and broad, human sympathies. 

In 1893 Mr. Gates married Miss Cora A. Eogers of Willimantic, 
who died in 1896. Of the two sons born to them one of them is now 
living, Kaymond P. 

In 1902 Mr. Gates married Miss Lena A. Broadhurst of Willi- 
mantic. Two children were born to them, Balph B. and Helen. 



ALEXANDER STEWART HAWKINS. 

HAWKINS, ALEXANDER STEWART, of Coventry, Con- 
necticut, a prominent figure in local and state politics, is 
fourth, in the male line of descent from Thomas Hawkins, 
who emigrated from Scotland and settled in South Kingston, Rhode 
Island, about two centuries ago. 

John Hawkins, father of Alexander, was born in Exeter, Rhode 
Island, in 1808, and was left fatherless while an infant. When eight 
years old he was placed with the family of William Crandall, a pros- 
perous farmer of South Kingston, Rhode Island, with whom he re- 
mained until sixteen years of age, performing the ordinary farm 
chores, and attending school during the winter season. He then began 
a life career for himself, working out upon neighboring farms until 
he reached the age of twenty-three years, when he married Sally 
Crandall, daughter of William Crandall and his wife Sally (Tucker) 
Crandall. He immediately leased and cultivated seventy acres of 
land in Griswold, Connecticut, which he subsequently purchased, 
together with contiguous farms until his final holdings consisted of 
two hundred and fifty acres of excellent agricultural land, three 
dwelling houses, and numerous outbuildings. The old homestead 
continues in the possession of the family to the present time, and is 
cherished with pride by his children and their descendants for its 
memories and associations of other days. There was born of the 
marriage aforesaid, Lucy Burrows Hawkins, now the widow of Hial 
Hull, residing with her two children in Willimantic, Connecticut; 
John Crandall Hawkins, a well to do farmer of Griswold, Connecticut, 
who has one son; William Horace Hawkins, late of Willimantic, 
who died at the age of sixty-three years ; Alexander Stewart Hawkins, 
the subject proper of this article; Julia Smith Hawkins, now widow 
of Clark Reynolds, residing at Willimantic; Sarah Jane Hawkins, 
now wife of Frank Bentley of Preston, Connecticut, and Mary Emma 
Hawkins, who married Captain Joseph T. Hull of Griswold, and died 
a^ed twenty-six years. Mr. Hawkins was a devout church member, 

422 






CtMr/ic^d. 




ALEXANDER STEWART HAWKINS. 425 

a consistent Democrat, an exemplary citizen, a successful farmer, and 
a model husband and father. He died February, 1865, and was sur- 
vived by his wife until February 13th, 1894. The remains of both 
are interred in Eixtown Cemetery, G'riswold, Connecticut. 

Alexander Stewart Hawkins was born at Griswold, Connecticut, 
on December 25th, 1838. He attended the schools of his native town 
until fifteen years of age, and then completed an academic course as 
student at the Preston Academy, where he graduated in 1856. The 
next ten years he devoted his entire time to the profession of teach- 
ing, mostly as principal, in the common schools of towns in Ehode 
Island and Connecticut, and taught at intervals thereafter until 1890. 
He was eminently fitted by training and temperament for his chosen 
profession, and met with exceptional success in teaching and supervis- 
ing schools in Voluntown, Lebanon, Norwich, and Stonington, in 
Connecticut, and East Greenwich, in Rhode Island. In 1866 he en- 
gaged in mercantile business at Liberty Hill, in the town of Lebanon, 
with considerable success and profit for three years. 

On March 18th, 1869, he was married to Mary Eliza Kingsley 
of Columbia, daughter of Captain Ogden Kingsley, a commissioned 
officer of the state militia, and Mary (Turner) Kingsley. The 
Kingsley family had been residents of Columbia since its incorpora- 
tion into a township, and stood pre-eminent in the community for 
industry, integrity, and executive ability. The Turner family were 
among the early settlers of the adjoining town of Coventry, and 
ranked equally high as desirable citizens. Mrs. Hawkins was a gradu- 
ate of the Broadway Academy of Norwich, and had taught school with 
marked ability previous to her marriage. In 1869, Mr. Hawkins 
purchased and located upon the " Old Turner Homestead," so-called. 
His wife's mother had been born upon this property and it had been 
in continuous possession of some member of the Turner family for 
more than two hundred years, and at present is the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hawkins. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Hawkins was specially en- 
dowed with qualifications that peculiarly fitted him for active partici- 
pation in town government, he could not be prevailed upon to accept 
office of any sort until 1875, and then only that of school visitor, and 
because of his interest in promoting and maintaining the highest 
possible standard of education compatible with the limited means of 
16 



426 



ALEXANDER STEWART HAWKINS. 



district schools. He has held the office of school visitor continuously 
from his first election to the present time, and during this period 
has been repeatedly chosen chairman of the board, and always acting 
as school visitor. His interest in public affairs having been thus 
enlisted, he was elected by eighty majority to the General Assembly 
in 1878, as first representative of a town in which his party was in a 
decided minority. He was again elected to the Legislature in 1883, 
and again in 1898. He served on the House Committees of manu- 
factures, railroads, and constitutional amendments. In 1901, he was 
elected delegate from the town of Coventry to the constitutional con- 
vention. Since his advent into the political arena he has been particu- 
larly active in the affairs of town government. He was chosen mem- 
ber of the board of selectmen in October of 1881, 1883, and 1887, 
and was elected first selectman in 1888, 1889, 1890, and 1891. He 
has been selected for the important position of assessor of taxes, every 
alternate year since 1879, and at this writing has nearly two more 
years to serve. He has held the office of Grand Juror, and has been 
many times chosen chairman of the board of relief. For twenty years 
he has been a justice of the peace, acting at first to accommodate 
neighbors in taking acknowledgments of written instrument, and in 
recent years as trial justice. 

On February 8th, 1865, Mr. Hawkins was admitted to member- 
ship in Eastern Star Lodge No. 44, F. & A. M., of Willimantic, and 
with his wife continues to be affiliated with the Order. 

Since attaining his majority he has been a life-long democrat, a 
conscientious citizen and public official, and of pronounced liberal 
undenominational religions proclivities. 

Mr. Hawkins, at present in his seventy-second year, is rounding 
out a practical and useful career upon the old Turner homestead, 
now a splendid residence surrounded by sixty acres of excellent farm 
land, in the enjoyment of good health, deserved prosperity, and of 
the respectful esteem of the community, as the Teward of an active 
outdoor life, intelligent husbandry, and unswerving fealty to public 
responsibilities and a high conception of duty. He has led a simple, 
clean, and upright life, and of all those who have known or met him, 
there is not one who has not paid homage to his manhood and unfail- 
ing kind disposition. 




(^£as<: Ck^&O^ 




ALEXANDER TROUP. 

TROUP, ALEXANDER, the late editor, proprietor and manager 
of the New Haven Union, was a former state representative 
and held many offices in the gift of the Democratic party in 
politics. As the founder, editor and manager of such a prominent 
newspaper as the New Hwven Union he occupied a high position in 
the world of journalism and he worked up to this eminence from 
the humhle starting point of " printer's devil." He was born in 
Halifax, Nova Scotia, on March 31st, 1840. His father was a jeweler 
and watch and clock maker of Halifax and was a man of great public 
spirit and political influence, who held several public offices in Halifax 
and was one of the donors of land for the beautiful Public Gardens 
and cemetery in Halifax. Mr. Troup's grandfather was also a clock 
maker and it was he who made and placed the town clock in the 
Halifax Citadel, which has kept perfect time for more than a century 
and is one of the city landmarks. Mr. Troup's grandfather was a 
lieutenant in the army of the Duke of Wellington and was wounded 
in the battle of Waterloo. The family came originally from Aberdeen, 
Scotland, and were first Covenanters and then Presbyterians. They 
came to America previous to the Revolutionary War and located in 
the State of Maine, but removed to Halifax after the outbreak of 
the War of the Revolution. 

The childhood and boyhood of Alexander Troup were spent in 
Halifax, where he received his early education. He hoped to enter 
the navy and his parents wanted him to enter the British army, but 
after completing studies that amounted to a college preparatory course 
he hired out as a " printer's devil " on the Halifax Record. 

A few years later, in 1856, he went to Boston, where he worked 
as a printer on various Boston papers. Brother " devils " who worked 
with him were former Mayor Patrick Collins of Boston and the late 
Mr. Taylor of Boston Globe fame. This was the beginning of many 
associations with men who were among the great men of their genera- 
tion. During the period of his journalistic experience in Boston he 

429 



430 ALEXANDER TROUP. 

was in close touch with William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, 
.John Boyle O'Beilly, Charles Halpine, and many other distinguished 
men, especially those who were prominent in the anti-slavery and 
labor cause. Mr. Troup founded the first paper in Boston which was 
devoted to the cause of labor, The Voice, of which the only copy 
extant is in the Boston Athenasum. 

After a number of years of newspaper work in Boston, Mr. Troup 
went to New York, where he was associated with Horace Greeley on 
the New York Tribune. In 1871 he located in New Haven and 
founded the New Haven Union, which he owned and controlled. 

Besides serving two terms as a member of the Connecticut State 
Legislature, Mr. Troup was a member of the New Haven Tax Com- 
mission in 1880, director of public works in New Haven from July, 
1899, to September, 1900, when he resigned, internal revenue collector 
for Ehode Island and Connecticut under President Cleveland from 
1885 to 1889, chairman of the Democratic State Committee from 
1896 to 1898, and Connecticut member of the Democratic National 
Convention from 1896 to 1900. An ardent Democrat, he was an 
enthusiastic advocate and a sincere personal friend of William 
Jennings Bryan, candidate for the presidency. Mr. Troup filled all 
of his responsible public positions conscientiously and satisfactorily. 

On June 12th, 1872, Mr. Troup married Miss Augusta Lewis, 
to whom he was introduced by the late renowned reformer, Susan B. 
Anthony. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Troup — Alex- 
ander, Philip, Grace, Augusta, Jessie, Elizabeth, Georgie and Elsie. 
The sons, Alexander and Philip, have succeeded their father in the 
business management and editorial control of the New Haven Union. 
Augusta and Jessie died in infancy. Mr. Troup died on September 
4, 1908. Successful in his life work, zealous and influential in politics, 
deeply and unselfishly interested in public affairs, and devoted to bis 
family and his friends, Alexander Troup deserved the time-worn 
epithet, "God's noblest work, an honest man," not only for what 
he did but for what he was. 




**~Ctslsxs^G<7 / fou l^OXo-^-Z <3-^xJl <xw ^ 



LIVINGSTON W. CLEAVELAND. 

CLEAVELAND, LIVINGSTON WAENEB, JUDGE, was born 
January 31st, 1860, at South Egremont, Berkshire County, 
Massachusetts. His father, Eev. James Bradford Cleaveland, 
a well-known Connecticut Congregational clergyman, died April 21st, 
1889. His mother, Elizabeth H. Jocelyn Cleaveland, with whom 
Judge Cleaveland now resides in New Haven, is a poetess, author of 
the widely read poem "No Sects in Heaven." Her father was the 
late Nathaniel Jocelyn, the noted portrait painter, one of the founders 
of the National Bank Note Engraving Company and the American 
Bank Note Company of New York City. Judge Cleaveland is a 
direct descendant, paternally, of Governor William Bradford, of the 
Mayflower, and Moses Cleaveland; maternally, he is a descendant of 
John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley, passengers on the Mayflower; 
he is related by common ancestry, paternally to Grover Cleveland and 
Governor Chauncey P. Cleveland, and maternally to John Adams, 
John Quincy Adams and (Governor) Jonathan Trumbull. 

Judge Cleaveland received his education under private tutors. 
At the age of nineteen he entered the law department of Yale 
College, graduating with the degree of LL.B. in 1881. In 1888 he 
received the degree of M.L. from Yale University. 

His first occupation was the law. Prior to his admission to the 
bar, however, he had been employed during vacation periods in the 
National Tradesmen's Bank of New Haven. He was elected Judge of 
Probate for the District of New Haven in 1894, the first Eepublican 
to hold that office in nearly thirty years. He was elected for six terms 
of two years each. In 1898 he was the only Eepublican on the ticket, 
national, state, or local, to carry New Haven. In 1900, when Bryan 
carried New Haven and the Democratic candidate for governor car- 
ried the city by about 4,500, Judge Cleaveland carried the city by 
about 1,100. He carried every town in his district every time he 
was a candidate. Early in 1906 he declined to be a candidate again, 
and accordingly in January, 1907, resumed his law practice. Among 

433 



434 



LIVINGSTON W. CLEAVELAND. 



the noted cases heard by him as judge of probate was the will ease 
of the late Philo S. Bennett, with which Colonel William Jennings 
Bryan was connected as executor. 

Before going on the bench Mr. Cleaveland was a member of 
the Board of Councilmen of New Haven two terms, 1891-1892, rep- 
resenting the tenth ward, and a member of the board of finance of 
New Haven, representing the Board of Councilmen. In 1902 Judge 
Cleaveland received 158 votes for the Republican nomination for 
governor of Connecticut. 

Judge Cleaveland is a member of the International Law Associa- 
tion, the American Bar Association, the State Bar Association of 
Connecticut, Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, Massa- 
chusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, the Graduates' Club, New 
Haven Chamber of Commerce, New Haven Colony Historical Society, 
the Improved Order Heptasophs (supreme committee on laws, 1894- 
1896), and New Haven Young Men's Bepublican Club; is one of the 
National Managers of the American Sunday-school Union, and is 
Chairman of the State Y. M. C. A. He was president of the Con- 
necticut State Y. M. C. A. convention in 1903 and 1909, moderator 
of the Connecticut Congregational Conference in 1905, president of 
the New Haven Congregational Club in 1900, and has been super- 
intendent of the New Haven City Mission Sunday-school since 1889. 

He is an enthusiastic horseback rider and devotes much of his 
leisure to that sport. He is unmarried. 

Among the cases successfully tried, since his resumption of his 
law practice, is that of Blake vs. Brothers, which went to the Con- 
necticut Supreme Court. In this case the question of the constitu- 
tionality of the Connecticut Secret Ballot Act was involved. Judge 
Cleaveland was employed by the city of New Haven as special counsel 
to represent the defendant, the election moderator. 



CHARLES CARTLIDGE GODFREY, M.D. 

GODFREY, DE. CHARLES C, physician and surgeon, former 
surgeon general of the state, and state representative, is a 
member of the surgical staffs of the Bridgeport Hospital 
and St. Vincent's Hospital of Bridgeport and one of the leaders in 
his profession in that city. 

He was born in Saybrook, Connecticut, February 3d, 1855, the 
son of the Rev. Jonathan Godfrey and Maria Cartlidge Godfrey, 
the former an Episcopal clergyman. The Godfreys have been resi- 
dents of Greens Farms and Southport, Connecticut, since 1688. Dr. 
Godfrey's paternal great and great-great-grandfathers served in the 
Revolutionary War, the latter being a lieutenant in Col. Whiting's 
regiment, which participated in the storming of Crown Point and 
Ticonderoga during the French and Indian War. The doctor's grand- 
father was Jonathan Godfrey of Southport, who served the state as 
representative from the town of Fairfield for several terms of the 
legislature. 

At the time of Charles Godfrey's birth his father was the rector 
of the Episcopal Church at Saybrook, but not long afterwards the 
family removed to Aiken, South Carolina, because of the latter's 
ill health. They remained in Aiken until the outbreak of the Civil 
War forced them to return north and they went to live in the family 
homestead at Southport, where Charles' education was begun. He 
attended private and public schools in Southport and Greenfield, 
Connecticut, and later a military school in Stamford. He then 
entered the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University, where he 
specialized in chemistry and received the degree of Ph. B. with the 
class of 1877. 

In 1881 Charles Godfrey located in Bridgeport and began the 
study of medicine under Dr. Robert Hubbard. He also attended 
courses of lectures in the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University, New York, and at Dartmouth Medical College, 
being graduated from the latter in 1883. 

437 



438 



CHARLES CARTLIDGE GODFREY, M.D. 



On the first of January, 1884, Dr. Godfrey formed a partnership 
with Dr. Hubbard which continued until Dr. Hubbard's death in 
1897, since when Dr. Godfrey has been in the partnership of Godfrey 
& Smith, physicians and surgeons, at 340 State Street, Bridgeport, 
where he carries on a large and eminent practice. Dr. Godfrey is 
a member of the State, County and City Medical Societies and" he 
has been president of the Bridgeport Medical Society. He is also a 
member of the American Medical Association, the New York Academy 
of Medicine, and the Association of Military Surgeons of the "United 
States. He is a member and former president of the Bridgeport 
Scientific Society. 

In municipal and state politics. Dr. Godfrey has had an import- 
ant part and has always affiliated with the Republican party. He 
was an alderman of the city of Bridgeport in 1892-3 and is a member 
of the Bridgeport Republican Club. 

Dr. Godfrey was surgeon of the Fourth Regiment, Connecticut 
National Guards, from 1890 to 1893, and surgeon general of the 
state on the staff of Governor Chamberlain in 1903-4 with the rank 
of colonel. 

Mrs. Godfrey is Carrie St. Leon Godfre}', daughter of the late 
Colonel Samuel B. Sumner of Bridgeport, having married Dr. Godfrey 
on April 30th, 1885. One daughter has been born of the marriage, 
Carrie Lucile Godfrey. 



EDWIN STARK THOMAS. 

THOMAS, EDWIN STARK, lawyer, former state representative, 
and secretary of the Democratic State Central Committee, is 
also president of the Mayo Radiator Company of New Haven. 
His law office is in New Haven but his home is in West Haven. He 
was born in Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois, November 11, 
1872. His father was Wilbur H. Thomas, who was engaged in the 
real estate and title business, and his mother was Mary Stark Thomas, 
a mother whose influence for good was brought to bear upon all 
phases of her son's life and character. As to his very early ancestors, 
Mr. Thomas claims descent from that historic and romantic Puritan 
couple, John Alden and Priscilla Mullins. 

As soon as he reached the age of thirteen, Edwin S. Thomas went 
to work on a farm and from that time until he became seventeen he 
earned his winter schooling by summers of hard farming. He pre- 
pared for college at the Hartford High School and the New Britain 
High School, graduating in 1891. He then entered Yale University 
with the class of 1895 and took one year of the Academic course. The 
years 1894 and 1895 he spent at the Yale Law School, where he was 
graduated in 1895. Meanwhile, in September, 1894, he had married 
Louise L. Peck, by whom he has had one child, Lois Peck Thomas. 

Ever since 1895 Mr. Thomas has been engaged in the active 
practice of law in New Haven, having an office on Church Street. 
His career as an attorney- at-law has been highly successful, though 
he is still a young lawyer. His time outside of his profession has 
been devoted to public service along military and political lines, and 
to fraternal life. From 1895 to 1898 he was a private in the New 
Haven Grays, Company P, Second Regiment, Connecticut National 
Guards. In 1899 he represented the Town of Orange in the General 
Assembly. He was, and has been since 1902, the secretary of the 
Democratic State Central Committee. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, a Shriner, an Elk, an Eagle, and a Granger. He is at present 
Captain General of New Haven Command ery, No. 2, Past Master 

441 



442 



EDWIN STABK THOMAS 



of Annawon Lodge No. 115, A. F. and A. M., and Esteemed Lectur- 
ing Knight, New Haven Lodge of Elks, No. 25. 

In 1905 Mr. Thomas was elected president of the Mayo Radiator 
Company of New Haven, a large concern manufacturing automobile 
radiators and specialties. He still holds this important industrial 
position. The automobile is associated as closely with his private life 
as with his business, for motoring is his favorite recreation and 
pastime. 

For the young man who would make his life work a success 
Mr. Thomas advocates " everlasting perseverance, constant application 
to work, watching for the right opportunity and cultivating the faculty 
of grasping it. Also temperance and moderation in all things." In 
creed Mr. Thomas is an Episcopalian. 



EDWARD EUGENE FULLER. 

FULLER, EDWARD EUGENE, state representative, insurance 
man, town official, and generally prominent business man of 
Tolland, Tolland County, Connecticut, is also a leader in 
Masonic and fraternal affairs. He comes of an old and distinguished 
family, the American branch of which was founded by Robert Fuller, 
who came from England in 1636 and settled in Salem and Rehoboth, 
Massachusetts. Another early paternal ancestor, Simon Huntington, 
ancestor of Gov. Samuel Huntington, came from England in 1633 
and settled in Norwich, Connecticut. The paternal line of Mr. Fuller's 
ancestors is traced through families illustrious in the history of New 
England and includes such honorable names as Butler, Meacham, 
Mason, Clark, and Ormsby, besides many of the name of Fuller who 
were public men. Sergeant Abijah Fuller, of Hampton, Connecticut, 
Mr. Fuller's paternal great-grandfather, served in the Revolutionary 
Army and had the honor of being delegated by General Putnam, his 
old friend and neighbor, to take charge of fortifying Bunker Hill 
the night before the battle. On the maternal side Mr. Fuller is 
descended from equally distinguished ancestors, whose names include 
Bliss, Abbott, White, Bissell, Baker, Burt, Dart, Douglass, Stearns, 
and Barnes. Thomas Bliss came from England in 1635 and settled 
in Hartford, George Abbott came from England in 1647 and settled 
in Rowley and Andover, Massachusetts, and Elder John White came 
from England in the " Good Ship Lyon " and settled in Hadley, 
Massachusetts. Mr. Fuller's maternal great-great-grandfather. Cap- 
tain Joel White, was a member of the Connecticut Committee of 
" Correspondence, Inspection and Safety " during the, Revolution and 
was chairman of that important committee part of the time. John 
Abbott, Mr. Fuller's maternal great-grandfather, served in a Massa- 
chusetts regiment during the Revolution. Mr. Fuller's parents were 
Lucius Seymour and Mary Eliza (Bliss) Fuller. His father was an 
insurance agent and farmer who held many public offices of import- 
ance. He was state representative and senator, delegate to the 

445 



446 EDTTAKD BDGENE FULLER 

Republican National Convention at Philadelphia in 1872, a member 
for many years of the Republican State Central Committee of Con- 
necticut, and judge of probate. He was president of the Tolland 
County National Bank, president of the Tolland County Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, and a trustee for many years of the Connecticut 
Hospital for the Insane at Middletown until his death, a period of 
more than twenty years. 

The date of Edward Eugene Fuller's birth, which occurred in 
Tolland, his life-long home, was May 13th, 1853. As a boy he worked 
outside of school hours on his father's farm and while he was thus 
learning lasting lessons of industry he was taught by a good father 
and mother to cultivate high moral ideals. He attended the district 
schools of Tolland, Woodstock Academy in Woodstock, Connecticut, 
and the Bryant and Stratton Business College in Philadelphia, where 
he was graduated in 1871. 

In December, 1871, Mr. Fuller began his insurance experience 
as a clerk in the office of the iEtna Fire Insurance Company of Hart- 
ford, remaining thus employed for ten years. In 1883 he became 
secretary of the Tolland County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
and he held this position until 1901, a period of eighteen years. He 
has also been a director of the Tolland County National Bank and of 
the Tolland County Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 

Always a loyal Republican and a zealous worker for the public 
weal, Mr. Fuller has frequently held public offices in town and state. 
For many years he has been a member of the town school board and 
was town auditor for several years. In 1895 he was state senator 
from the Twenty-fourth District, serving as chairman of the Com- 
mittees on " Insurance " and " Manual and Boll." In 1900 he was 
alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention at Phila- 
delphia. He was State Building and Loan Commissioner in 1900 
and 1901. In 1909 he was elected state representative from the town 
of Tolland and served as chairman of the Committee on " Insurance" 
and as a member of the Committee on the " State Library." 

Mr. Fuller's father and both of his brothers, John B. and Lucius 
H., have been members of the Connecticut House of Representatives, 
while his father and one brother, Lucius H., as well as himself, have 
been members of the Connecticut Senate, an unusual familv record 
in legislative annals. 



EDWARD EUGENE FULLEB 447 

Mr. Fuller is a veteran of the Connecticut National Guard, of 
which he was a charter member in Company K, First Kegiment. He 
served in that company from 1879 to 1884. In church affiliations 
as well as in military service he has followed his ancestors, as he 
attends the Congregational Church, of which so many of his progeni- 
tors were members, and was for five years the treasurer and chairman 
of the Congregational Ecclesiastical Society of Tolland. 

Mr. Fuller is also a member of many fraternal and patriotic 
orders. Among these may be mentioned the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Patrons of Husbandry, the Sons of the American 
Kevolution, and the Order of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
being in the latter a member of the lodge, chapter, council, com- 
mandery, mystic shrine, and having taken the thirty-second degree 
in the Scottish Kite, and being a member of the Order of the Eastern 
Star. In his official Masonic life he has filled, among other positions, 
the following: Worshipful Master of Fayette Lodge, No. 69; Most 
Excellent High Priest of Adoniram Chapter, No. 18, and Thrice 
Illustrious Master of Adoniram Council, No. 14, all of Rockville; 
Eminent Commander of St. John's Commandery, Knights Templar, 
No. 11, of Willimantic, and Potent Master of Charter Oak Lodge 
of Perfection of Hartford. In 1902 he was Grand Commander of 
the Grand Commandery of Connecticut; in 1905 he was Grand Master 
of the Most Puissant Grand Council of Connecticut, and in 1908 
he was Grand Master of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Con- 
necticut. Mr. Fuller is also a Past Noble Grand of Rising Star 
Lodge, No. 49, I. 0. 0. F., and Past Master Workman of Rockville 
Lodge, A. O. U. W., both of Eockville, and has been for fifteen 
years a member of the Board of Visitors of the Masonic Home at 
Wallingford. 

Mr. Fuller has never married, and has found recreation and 
pleasure in following his inherited love for literature, which has 
resulted in the bringing together of one of the largest and finest 
private libraries in the state. 

Mr. Fuller, who is a pleasing and forceful speaker, is often called 
upon to address special gatherings. His keen eye, his frank and 
open countenance, his wide range of knowledge, his large vocabulary, 
his power to comprehend and distinguish quickly, coupled with his 
strong individuality and ability to express himself easily, quickly, 



448 



HOWARD EUGENB FULLER 



and to the point, makes him a speaker of exceptional power. To those 
who know Mr. Fuller best he will be remembered as a man who is very 
social in his nature and is the personification of faithfulness and 
enthusiasm in any object with which he allies himself, and as a man 



whose word is as good as his bond. 




(xlru/^r \r,-H&^L — N 



ABNER PIERCE HAYES. 

HAYES, ABNEB PIERCE, LL.B., lawyer of Waterbury, prose- 
cuting agent for New Haven County, and former state 
representative, was born in Bethlehem, Litchfield County, 
Connecticut, January 25th, 1876. His father, Franklin Pierce Hayes, 
a fanner, was first selectman of Bethlehem for eight years, state repre- 
sentative in 1891, and chairman of the Republican Town Committee 
of Bethlehem for many years. Through him Abner Hayes is descended 
from John Hayes, who came from England and settled in Easton, 
Connecticut, about 1750. On the maternal side Mr. Hayes traces his 
ancestry to Eichard Blois, who settled at Watertown, Massachusetts, 
about 1670. Mr. Hayes' mother was Katherine Pierce Blois, a woman 
of great intellectual and moral force. 

The first fifteen years of Abner Hayes' life were spent on his 
father's farm, where he did the usual work of a farmer's son and 
acquired habits of industry and pertinacity, as well as right views of 
the dignity of manual labor. His intellectual life was equally devel- 
oped, for he read the Bible several times and the entire works of 
Shakespeare during his early boyhood. In later life he derived great 
profit and pleasure from the study of history, political science, soci- 
ology, and law. He prepared for college at the Mt. Herman School for 
Boys and then entered Yale University, where he was graduated with 
the class of 1898, receiving the degree of B.A. 

Prom 1898 to 1900 Mr. Hayes acted as statistician for the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company at Pittsburg. He next studied law at the 
Yale Law School, where he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1902. He began the general practice of law in Waterbury in 1903, 
building up his present fine practice with speedy success. With him 
the law and politics have been interlacing careers. In 1902 he was a 
delegate to the Connecticut Constitutional Convention, in 1907 and 
1909 he was state representative, and since 1907 he has been prose- 
cuting agent for New Haven County. He is still a young man and his 
career in politics and his profession promises many more noteworthy 
chapters. 

451 



452 ABNER PIERCE HAYES. 

While in college Mr. Hayes was made a member of the Phi Beta 
Kappa fraternity. He is a member of the orders of Masons and Elks 
and various other fraternal bodies. He enjoys all kinds of outdoor 
sports and exercise. He is a member of the Congregational Church. 
In politics he is a prominent Republican. On the fourth of November, 
1908, Mr. Hayes married Margaret Ingoldsby FitzPatrick. Their 
home is at 29 Cooke Street, Waterbury. 



HADLAI AUSTIN HULL. 

HULL, HADLAI AUSTIN, attorney at law of New London, 
Connecticut, and state's attorney, was born in the town of 
Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, on August 22, 
1854. His father was Joseph Hull, a school teacher who also engaged 
in the seafaring and whaling industry, and his mother was Mary 
Ellen Hull, who exerted a marked influence on her son's mental and 
moral standards. On his father's side Mr. Hull is descended from 
Joseph Hull, an early settler of Rhode Island, and Hannah Perry, a 
cousin of Oliver Hazard Perry. On his mother's side he is descended 
from John P. Babcock, his mother's great-great-grandfather, who was 
killed by Arnold at Groton Heights, Connecticut, on September 6th, 
1781. Hadlai Fish, Mr. Hull's maternal grandfather, came of a family 
who were early settlers of Stonington and Groton. 

Although Hadlai A. Hull was reared in the country and had 
plenty of work to do in his boyhood, on a farm and in a grist mill, he 
had excellent educational advantages and read widely outside of school. 
His reading of history, the Bible, and Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress was 
particularly lasting in influence. He prepared for college at the 
Natchaug High School in Willimantic, and then entered Amherst 
College, where he studied for one year. He then entered Yale Law 
School, where he was graduated in 1880. Between the time of his 
leaving Amherst and graduating from law school he taught school 
for three years. 

In August, 1880, Mr. Hull began the practice of law in Ston- 
ington. During President Cleveland's administration he acted as 
collector of the port of Stonington and in 1884 he represented that 
town in the State Legislature. He was also a member of the Ston- 
ington board of education in that year. 

For twelve years Mr. Hull was prosecuting attorney of the 
Criminal Court of Common Pleas of New London County, and since 
March 3, 1906, he has been state's attorney. For some time he has had 
his law office in New London, where he has also made his home. His 
practice is large and well esteemed. 
17 455 



456 



HADLAI AUSTIN HULL. 



At the time of the Spanish War Mr. Hull recruited and became 
captain of Company H, major of the Third Battalion, Third Connec- 
ticut Volunteer Infantry. He organized the First Company, Coast 
Artillery, in the Connecticut Militia, and is retired major, Coast 
Artillery. 

Mr. Hull is a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner. In 
politics he is an " old-fashioned Democrat" whose vote is " quite inde- 
pendent." He enjoys outdoor life and his favorite sport is baseball. 
He is a member of the First Baptist Church of New London. 

On the 31st of March, 1878, Mr. Hull married Mary J. Jencks, 
by whom he had one son, Hadlai Hull, born in 1883. On the 26th of 
June, 1906, Mr. Hull married Ellen Brewster. One daughter has been 
born of this union, Eleanor Hull, born May 6th, 1909. 



DENNIS H. TIERNEY. 

TIERNEY, DENNIS H., who is engaged in the real estate, insur- 
ance, and bond and surety business in Waterbury, where he is 
one of the prominent business men, is also an inventor. 
He was born in Abbeyleix, Queens County, Ireland, in 1846, the grand- 
son of Matthew Tierney, a lumber dealer, and the son of John and 
Margaret McDonald Tierney. When Dennis Tierney was two years 
old his family came to the United States by way of Quebec in a sailing 
vessel which took fourteen weeks for the trip. An outbreak of fever 
caused the vessel to be quarantined near Quebec where the father and 
two of the children soon died. The mother, in every way destitute, 
managed to get her three remaining children to Waterbury and reared 
them by constant toil and self-denial until they were old enough to 
support themselves. She died in 1888. Through her influence and 
help Dennis secured a fairly good education, partly in the district 
schools and partly at night school. At the early age of nine he went 
to work in a buckle factory in Waterbury and later in other local 
factories until he became accomplished in metal working. From the 
time he was eighteen until he became of age he was employed in the 
thimble department of the Scovill Manufacturing Company where he 
learned to make tools and various branches of the machine business. 
He was ambitious to have the advantages of work and study in a large 
city and in 1867 he went to New York and took a year's course of in- 
struction in mechanical drawing at Cooper Union where he was gradu- 
ated with highest honors in 1868. He also attended courses in the New 
York evening schools and had practical experience in various machine 
shops and in perfecting machinery for the making of silver thimbles 
from a solid disk of silver for Ketchum Brothers and McDougal & 
Company of New York. He remained in New York three years and 
during that time invented a bevel, and tapering gauge, a necktie fas- 
tener, and a lathe-chuck by the use of which work could be adjusted 
to the thousandth part of an inch in the lathe. 

Upon leaving New York Mr. Tierney went to Danbury where he 
worked for a short time in a sewing machine factory. He then went 

459 



460 



DENNIS H. TIERNET. 



to Forestville where he made dies in the burner department of the 
Bristol Brass and Clock Company with whom he remained for ten 
years. During that period he invented " Tiemey's Diamond Dust 
Hardening Powder" which has proved a great success. He also in- 
vented a popular mechanical toy. 

In 1881 Mr. Tierney returned to Waterbury and opened the 
Naugatuck Valley Patent Agency. He soon added the real estate, 
general insurance, bond and surety business and moved to his present 
quarters at 167 Bank Street, Waterbury, where he conducts all branches 
of his business on a large scale. 

For some time Mr. Tierney has been president of the Globe Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers of the Evening Globe of Waterbury, and a 
stockholder in the Commercial Record, a New Haven paper. He is 
intensely interested in education and in 1893 he was chairman of the 
financial committee of the Central school district of Waterbury. 

Although Mr. Tierney is a broad-minded and patriotic American 
citizen who works for the public good regardless of creed or politics, 
he is a loyal Irishman and a devout Eoman Catholic. He is a member 
of the Church of the Immaculate Conception and active in all the 
affairs of that parish. In 1880 he was president of the Young Men's 
Catholic Institute of Naugatuck, and he used his influence to have 
the library of that Institute at the disposal of all, regardless of creed or 
race. In 1882 he organized a Father Matthew Total Abstinence and 
Benevolent Society in Bristol and was its first president. Since that 
time he has adhered to the principles of total abstinence and deems that 
course to have been of great advantage to his health, usefulness, and 
happiness. In every possible way Mr. Tierney works for the highest 
welfare of Hibernians in this country. At the time of their Centennial 
in Waterbury he was chairman of the reception committee and presi- 
dent of the Second Division, A. 0. H. He was president of the associa- 
tion organized to erect a monument to James Reynolds, the Irish 
patriot, and treasurer of the committee to raise funds for sending the 
remains of another Irish patriot, Stephen Meany, back to Ireland. 
Like all true Irishmen he is a lover of liberty and exerts every effort 
to abolish political oppression and social evils. He is a Democrat in 
politics. He was instrumental in securing proper recognition for the 
Waterbury heroes of the Spanish-American War and also in sending 
aid to the Boers of South Africa. He is a member of the order of 
Knights of Columbus and was grand knight of Carrolton Council. 



DENNIS H. TIERNEY. 461 

His zeal, patriotism, strong sense of justice, and desire for a good, 
clean government make him a force for good in his community as 
well as an example of worthy citizenship. 

In 1873 Mr. Tierney married Julia A. Smith, who came from 
Ireland to Waterbury in childhood. She died in 1875, survived by one 
son, Henry S., who was chief engineer of the government steam 
launch " Percy " in Cuban waters during the Spanish- American War. 
Ten years later, in 1885, Mr. Tierney married Annie Fisher of Dan- 
bury, a native of Ireland, who died, childless, in 1887. In 18S9 Mr. 
Tierney married Margaret Cassidy of Greenwood, New York, by whom 
he has had seven children : John D., Matthew D., May M., Mark, 
Madeline C, Geraldine J., and Luke. All but the last named are now 
living. 



SILAS CHAPMAN, JR. 

CHAPMAN, SILAS, JR., was born in Hartford September 2d, 
1845, and is the third in direct line of descent to bear the name. 
He completed a course in the Hartford High School, and in 
1863 began his business career as an office boy with the North Ameri- 
can Fire Insurance Company. In 1868 he was appointed local agent 
in Hartford for the Firemen's Fund Insurance Company of San 
Francisco, and when the North American was closed out, in 1871, 
he had a fair agency business established. It was largely through 
his influence that so much of the stock of the Firemen's Fund (some 
$200,000) was placed in Hartford. In the fall of 1892 Mr. Chapman 
purchased the agency business of B. R. Allen, which included the 
agency of the Hartford and the Royal Insurance Companies. Far 
many years he occupied offices in the building on the corner of Asy- 
lum and Trumbull streets, where the office of the North American 
was located, but in 1885 he took the north basement office in the 
Hartford Fire Insurance Company's building, and in 1892 he re- 
moved to the south basement, which was formerly occupied by Mr. 
Allen. Mr. Chapman is a gentleman of culture and refined taste, 
and has traveled extensively in this country and elsewhere. He is 
prominent in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-third degree 
in Scottish Rite Masonry. He is a member of Washington Conimand- 
ery, K. T., and was master of Hartford Council, Princes of Jerusalem, 
for many years. He is also active in religious work, has been clerk 
of the First Baptist Society in Hartford since 1873, and was librarian 
for twenty years in the Sunday-school. Being an ardent disciple 
of old Izaak Walton, he has been a regular visitor in the Rangley 
Lake region for many reasons, where, with a company of chosen 
friends in his favorite pastime, he is one of the most companionable of 
men. In business he is reticent, clear-headed, and penetrating to the 
last detail, and his selection by President Chase of the Hartford for 
the most influential agency in the company is an expression of con- 
fidence of the highest value. Mr. Chapman is a director in the 

•162 



SILAS CHAPMAN, JB. 465 

Charter Oak National Bank of Hartford; the Billings & Spencer Co., 
one of the largest manufacturing concerns in Hartford; the Middle- 
sex County Mutual Fire Insurance Co., and several other manufactur- 
ing corporations. 

Silas Chapman, Jr., was married December 10th, 1868, to Julia 
A. Camp, who was born in Windsor, Connecticut, August 13th, 1848. 



MARCUS M. JOHNSON, M.D. 

JOHNSON, MARCUS MORTON, B.Ph., M.D., a renowned 
Connecticut physician and surgeon, whose operations for 
appendicitis and in ovariotomy and whose discovery of a new 
and successful treatment for diphtheria have made him a famous 
and valued exponent of his profession, is also well known as the 
founder and proprietor of Woodland Sanitarium, Hartford, Con- 
necticut. He was born in Malone, New York, April 21, 1844. His 
ancestry on both branches of his family tree is distinguished and 
interesting. On the paternal side it is to be traced back through five 
generations to Sir John Johnson, Sr., sea captain of an English vessel, 
who afterwards settled in Connecticut and whose son, John Johnson, 
Jr., settled in Rutland, Vermont. Silas Johnson> the doctor's grand- 
father, was a pioneer settler of Malone, New York. Dr. Johnson's 
father was Marvin L. and his mother Polly Chapman Johnson, who 
is still living and is approaching her one hundredth birthday. Her 
side of the family is noted for its longevity as well as for its promi- 
nence in our early history. Her lineage is traceable through seven 
generations to a Dean of Coventry, England, and includes early 
settlers of Norwich, Connecticut, and Revolutionary heroes. 

After preparing for college at the Franklin Academy in his 
native town, Marcus M. Johnson entered Brown University, where 
he was graduated in 1870 with the degree of B.Ph. He received his 
medical degree at the University of New York, where he was gradu- 
ated with high honors, receiving the Valentine Mott Gold Medal, the 
highest award for excellence in anatomy and dissections. He earned 
the money for his professional education by teaching for five years in 
the Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield. He is now a trustee of 
that school and has been president of its alumni association since 1876. 
After obtaining his M.D. degree, Dr. Johnson became house surgeon 
at the Hartford Hospital, which experience was followed by two years 
of advanced surgical study abroad. While in Europe he studied under 
such eminent surgeons as Thomas Keith of Edinburgh, whom he 
assisted in six ovariotomies, Sir Joseph Lister of London, Billroth 

406 



MARCUS M. JOHNSON, M.D. 469 

of Vienna, Martin, the Berlin gynecologist, and Von Langenbeck, a 
dean of operative surgery. 

In 1880 Br. Johnson returned to Hartford and opened his own 
office for the practice of medicine and advanced surgery. In 1882 
Hartford was visited by a terrible epidemic of diphtheria, and Dr. 
Johnson was the first to use bichloride of mercury, a step strongly 
opposed by his fellow physicians, but which met with such success that 
he won not only fame but many professional followers. 

After a few years of successful practice in Hartford, Dr. John- 
son, convinced of the many disadvantages of conducting operations 
in the patients' homes, opened a sanitarium on Woodland Street, 
Hartford, provided with the most advanced surgical equipment, elec- 
trical devices, and sanitary conveniences, and the best-trained nurses. 
Here, under Dr. Johnson's thorough and skillful guidance, nearly a 
thousand operations have been performed, some of them unique in 
the history of surgery in this community. Particularly noteworthy 
was a highly successful operation which Dr. Johnson performed in 
1899 on a nineteen days' infant in a strangulated condition for thirty- 
five hours. He was one of the first Hartford physicians to operate 
successfully in appendicitis and has been a vital factor in the growth 
of that important branch of surgery. 

Dr. Johnson's contributions to the technical literature of his 
calling have been many and valuable. They include the following 
articles: Diphtheria, Its History, Etiology, and Treatment; The 
Technique of Removing the Appendix Vermiform, with a Report of 
100 Cases with 2 Deaths; History of the First Twenty-three Cases 
of Gastrostomy with Successful Cases by the Writer; Etiology of 
Hernia of the Ovary; History of the Treatment of Injuries to the 
Face, and many others. He is a member of the city, county, state, and 
national medical societies, a fellow of the New York Academy of 
Medicine, and a surgeon to St. Francis Hospital. 

Fraternally, Dr. Johnson is a member of Washington Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar, and the Connecticut Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. For many years he has been surgeon to 
the First Company of Governor's Foot Guards. 

On February 14th, 1884, Dr. Johnson married Mrs. Helen 
Lyman Jackson. They have two daughters, Helen Gaylord and Ethel 
Chapman Johnson. 



DEXTER LEETE BISHOP. 

BISHOP, DEXTER LEETE, secretary and treasurer of the Dex- 
ter L. Bishop Company, ice and lumber dealers of Meriden, 
ex-president of the Connecticut State Business Men's Asso- 
ciation, and president of the Connecticut Ice Dealers' Association, was 
born in the little town of Orange, New Haven County, Connecticut, 
August 8th, 1865. His early ancestors were important factors in the 
life of the Colonies, the first to come to this country being James 
Bishop who came from England to New Haven and was secretary and 
deputy governor of the Colony and finally lieutenant-governor, serv- 
ing from 1681 to 1691. James Bishop's first wife was Mary Lamber- 
ton, a daughter of Captain Lamberton of the ship Phantom. By his 
second wife James Bishop had four children, the eldest son being 
Samuel who was town clerk of New Haven. Samuel's son and grand- 
son succeeded to that office in turn so that the town clerkship of New- 
Haven was held by this family for one hundred and sixteen years. 
Dexter Bishop is a direct descendant of James Bishop whose descend- 
ants removed to North Haven and took an active part in the affairs 
of that community. Mr. Bishop's father was Walter Goodrich Bishop, 
a farmer, and his mother was Nancy Maria Leete, daughter of Capt. 
Rufus Norton Leete. She was descended from Governor William 
Leete who came to this country with the Rev. Whitfield and, while 
on shipboard, was one of the signers of the Plantation Covenant. 
January 13th, 1639. Governor Leete had been a lawyer in the Bishop's 
Court at Cambridge, England, and in that position became a student 
of the oppressive treatment of the Puritans and also of their doctrine 
and as a result gave up his position and joined the Puritans. He was 
one of the original proprietors of Guilford and bought " Leete's Is- 
land " for himself. He was clerk of the Plantation from 1639 to 1662, 
a deputy from Guilford to the General Court from 1643 to 1650, and 
magistrate of the town from 1651 to 1658. He was Governor of his 
Colony from 1661 to 1664 and was Governor of the Connecticut Colony 
after the union of the two. He held the latter office until his death in 

470 




■7/. 



^€<%% ^%::^t ";-'7^Y / - 



DEXTER LEETE BISHOP. 



473 



1683. He was one of the " seven pillars " of the original church in 
Guilford. 

When Dexter Bishop was a lad of six his parents left Orange and 
located in Guilford where he lived until he attained his majority. He 
attended the Guilford public school and the Guilford Academy where 
he was graduated in 1884. Two years later he left home and went to 
Meriden to take a position as clerk in the office of the Little, Somers 
and Hyatt Company with whom he remained for eight years. 

In January. 1895, Mr. Bishop purchased an interest in the ice 
business carried on by Foster Brothers of Meriden. and two years 
later he purchased the entire business, which was reorganized in 
January, 1898, as the Dexter L. Bishop Company with him as secre- 
tary, treasurer, and business manager. The business is a very large 
one and includes ice and domestic lumber, both wholesale and retail. 
Since the company was formed it has acquired the business of four- 
teen competitors, and not only has a large percentage of the ice 
business of Meriden, but sends large shipments outside. Mr. Bishop 
is actively interested in the ice industry throughout the State, and for 
three years he has been president of the Connecticut Ice Dealers' 
Association, which office he still holds. He is a member of the Natural 
Ice Association of America, and represents Connecticut on the 
executive board of that body. He is affiliated with the ice associations 
of Massachusetts and New York, also the Eastern Ice Association. 
He has had an important part in developing the ice industry in this 
part of the country along the lines of modern business methods. 
He has been secretary and president of the Meriden Business 
Men's Association, and in 1909 was made president of the State 
Business Men's Association of which he had formerly been secretary 
and first and second vice-presidents. 

A thirty-second degree Mason, Mr. Bishop is a member of the 
following fraternal bodies: Center Lodge No. 97, F. and A. M. : 
Keystone Chapter No. 27, K. A. M.; Hamilton Council No. 22, 
R. and S. M. ; St. Elmo Commandery No. 9, Knights Templar; 
Pyramid Temple N. and M. S. ; E. G. Storer Lodge of Perfection, 
A. A. S. K.; Elm City Council, Princes of Jerusalem, A. A. S. P.: 
New Haven Chapter Eose Croix, Lafayette Consistory. S. P. of 
R. S. A. and A. S. R. He is also a member of the Home Club of 
Meriden, the Colonial Club, and the Highland Country Club of 
Meriden. In politics he is a strong Republican, and in 1900 and 



474 



DEXTER LEETE BISHOP. 



1901, he served on the Meriden Board of Aldermen. He is a member 
of the Center Congregational Church and a trustee of the Meriden 
Y. W. C. A. 

On November 4, 1892, Mr. Bishop married Esther Cornelia 
Johnson, daughter of the late Chauncey G. Johnson, a well known 
real estate man. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, 
Ethel Johnson, Herbert Leete, who died in 1905, and Wilfred 
Merriman. Mrs. Bishop died in January, 1903. In November, 1908, 
Mr. Bishop married May Bauman, daughter of John and Carrie 
(Welles) Bauman of New Haven. One son has been born of this 
second marriage. 



WILLIAM E. ATTWOOD. 

ATTWOOD, WILLIAM E., president of the New Britain Trust 
Company, treasurer of the Burritt Savings Bank of New 
Britain, former state representative and senator, secretary of 
the New Britain hoard of education and former president of the 
Mechanics National Bank of New Britain, is justly regarded as one 
of Connecticut's most prominent bankers. He is a typical Connecti- 
cut son in that he was born and educated in the country and from the 
humble beginning of clerk in a country post office has carved his own 
way to high places in the world of finance and to positions of public 
honor. He was born in the village of East Haddam, Middlesex 
County, Connecticut, on February 24th, 1864. His grandfather was 
Whiting Attwood who was born in East Haddam in 1787 and his 
father was William Henry Attwood, a carpenter by trade. His 
mother was Josephine Bishop Attwood. 

The education which William E. Attwood received was merely 
that of the East Haddam district school. At the age of thirteen he 
went to work in the post office at East Haddam and kept the books of 
W. C. Beynolds the post-master, who also ran a lumber and coal yard. 
He was employed there for six years. 

In 1883, when he was nineteen years of age, Mr. Attwood left 
the position with Mr. Beynolds to become bookkeeper in the National 
Bank of New England at East Haddam. Four years later, in 1887, 
he was called to New Britain to be cashier of the Mechanics National 
Bank in that city. In 1900 he became vice-president of that bank 
and in 1905 he was made its president. He held that high office 
until 1907 when he resigned to take his present position as president 
of the New Britain Trust Company. The history of the Mechanics 
National Bank of New Britain was one of marked success under Mr. 
Attwood's guidance. It was liquidated in 1907, its business being 
combined with that of the Hardware City Trust Company and taken 
over by The New Britain Trust Company of which Mr. Attwood was 
elected President, which position he still holds. 

477 



478 



WILLIAM E. ATTWOOD. 



Since 1893 Mr. Attwood has been treasurer of the Burritt Sav- 
ings Bank of New Britain, another evidence of his prominence in the 
banking world. From 1899 to 1910 he was a member of the New 
Britain board of education and the last seven years of that time he 
was secretary of that board. In the session of 1901 he was state 
representative from New Britain and served on the committee on 
banks, acting as house chairman. In 1905 he was state senator from 
the sixth senatorial district and was senate chairman of the committee 
on banks. He has always been a loyal and active Republican in his 
political affiliation. 

Socially Mr. Attwood has many interests, being an Odd Fellow, 
a member of Middlesex Lodge No. 3, East Haddam, and a member of 
the New Britain Club. He was president of the New Britain Club 
in 1909 and 1910. He is an Episcopalian in creed and is a member 
of St. Mark's Church, New Britain. From 1905 to 1908 he was a 
vestryman of that parish. 

On October 11th, 1887, Mr. Attwood married Alice Belden 
Seward of East Haddam who died in 1905. One daughter was born 
of this marriage and she died in 1900. On June 2d, 1906, Mr. Att- 
wood married Fannie Canfield Wetmore of Meriden. Their home is 
at 175 Vine Street, New Britain. 





CZcV 



DIETRICH EDWARD LOEWE. 

LOEWE, DIETRICH EDWARD, one of Danbury's foremost 
manufacturers and leading public men, is well known to the 
industrial history of the state for his unique success in enforc- 
ing the law against boycotts and in defeating the unions of hatters 
so effectively that his own " open shop " for the manufacture of hats 
is one of the best and most prosperous in the country. 

Germany was Dietrich E. Loewe's native land and his birthplace 
was Greste, the date of his birth being June 21st, 1852. His parents 
were Adolph and Charlotte Shalh Loewe, who maintained a farm 
that had been in the family for several hundred years. Adolph Loewe 
wa6 town councillor, road commissioner, and poor law guardian up to 
the time of his death in 1866. The boy Dietrich spent his summers 
at work on the home farm and his winters at school in a near-by city. 
His home influences were strongly for his good, as his mother was a 
sincere Christian with a sweet disposition and true family devotion. 
Her sons grew up to be very manly and strong under her guidance 
Though not a great reader, Dietrich was thoughtful and earnest in 
his school work and had a great love for the beauties of nature. When 
he reached the age of fourteen and had completed the district school 
course, he entered the agricultural college at Hupen, near Bielefild, but 
as that college was closed after his first term he soon entered the 
Bielefeld" institution and specialized in higher mathematics and civil 
engineering. His plans were defeated by ill health and he went home 
to build up his constitution on the farm. At the age of eighteen, as 
soon as he had fully regained his health, he and his brother Ernest 
came to America to fulfill their ambition for being citizens of the 
United States. They arrived in New York, June 30th, 1870. After 
many discouragements, Dietrich secured employment on a railroad at 
Middletown, New York, where a construction company was digging 
a bed-way. The following winter he worked for a business concern 
on Long Island and during the subsequent summer he was engaged as 
shipping clerk for a wholesale grocery firm in New York City. 

In November, 1871, Mr. Loewe located in Danbury and set about 

481 



482 



DIETEICH EDWARD LOEWE. 



learning the hatting trade. He devoted the following three years to 
the making of fur hats and during the dull summer season busied 
himself with painting. In 1876 he became foreman of a Danbury hat 
factory and in 1879 he embarked for himself under the firm name of 
D. E. Loewe and Company. The business is still so styled. He ran 
successfully as an open shop until 1885, when the various hat manu- 
facturers of Danbury entered into a trade union agreement which 
provided a mode for settling disputes without strike. In 1893 a 
refusal of the union to modify union rules brought about a conference 
which terminated in the closing of all factories in November of that 
year. The following February two-thirds of the factories re-opened 
as independent or open factories and D. E. Loewe and Company was 
among them. By 1900 all but three of these had been unionized, but 
in Mr. Loewe's factory union and non-union men worked harmoniously 
side by side. Though threatened with coercion, Mr. Loewe refused to 
cancel his contract with his many faithful and capable non-union 
employees, and in April, 1901, he formally issued his well-known 
declaration of independence, in which he clearly stated his convictions 
that his open policy was for the best interest of all and the assurance 
that his factory would not be unionized and would use all lawful mean9 
of protection. The following spring and fall the union ordered Mr. 
Loewe's union men to other factories, but they got back to Mr. Loewe 
as soon as they could. In June, 1902, by threats of bodily violence 
and social ostracism, all but eight men were driven from the Loewe 
factory and union agents systematized a boycott of the Loewe products 
all over the country. Mr. Loewe and his supporters then organized 
the American Anti-Boycott Association, which undertook to finance the 
enforcing of the law against boycotts. The procedure consisted of the 
Loewe suits, one in the Superior Court of Fairfield County and one in 
the United States District Court in 1903 against the two hundred 
United Hatters of North America in Danbury, Bethel, and South 
Norwalk. Beal estate and bank accounts to the amount of $202,000 
were attached. The officers of the American Federation of Labor 
were named as defendants and their counsel claimed the suits had no 
standing in the courts and the boycott was pushed with renewed force 
in California, where it was directed against one of Mr. Loewe's largest 
customers. Mr. Loewe's ruin seemed imminent and would have hap- 
pened but that he suddenly appeared in California and applied for a 
temporary restraining order in the United States Circuit Court of 



DIETRICH EDWARD LOEWE. 



483 



that district. Upon due hearing this injunction was not only obtained 
but made permanent. This finished the affair and the boycott soon 
ceased. Mr. Loewe's customers gladly returned and his business 
resumed and steadily increased. After a slow progress the suits were 
heard in the United States Supreme Court in February, 1908, and the 
famous decision was rendered which declared the United Hatters and 
the American Federation of Labor guilty of a boycott that was " illegal 
and in restraint of interstate trade." This was an important step in 
national industrial progress, for it established the principle that " labor 
unions and their officers are personally liable for damage inflicted by 
boycott and the victim may sue and recover three-fold the loss actually 
sustained." After six weeks' trial in the United States Circuit Court 
of Appeals, before Judge James P. Piatt, they obtained a judgment 
of $235,000. 

Outside of his great part in industrial affairs, Mr. Loewe is promi- 
nent in many ways. He was assistant chief of the Danbury Fire 
Department in 1880, assessor of Danbury soon after that, and state 
representative on the Democratic ticket in 1887. He has been council- 
man and alderman. In 1896 Mr. Loewe voted for McKinley and he 
has been a Eepublican ever since that time. He is a member of the 
executive board of the Danbury Relief Society, and since 1901 has been 
president of the Danbury Hospital Board. He is a member of the 
German Benevolent Society and was its secretary for thirty years, 
resigning in 1902. He was at one time chairman of the town poor 
investigation committee. 

On June 21st, 1877, Mr. Loewe married Christina Heinzelman. 
Their children are Charlotte C, Mathias C, Earnest E., D. Carl, 
Melanie C, and A. Percival. 



18 



FRANKLIN SULLIVAN FAY. 

FAY, FRANKLIN SULLIVAN, attorney at law, judge of 
the City and Police Courts of Meriden, New Haven County, 
Connecticut, was born in Marlboro, Middlesex County, Mass- 
achusetts, on September 26th, 1848. He is in the seventh generation 
of descent from John Fay, who was born in England in 1648 and 
came to this country on the ship " Speedwell " in 1656, landing in 
Boston and settling in Marlboro in 1667. John Pay, Second, was a 
prominent citizen of Westboro, Massachusetts where he held many 
public offices. Josiah Fay, Mr. Fay's great grandfather, also held 
many town offices and was a soldier with a distinguished record, 
having been a sergeant in the Crown Point Expedition, one of the 
" Minute Men," and major in the Revolutionary War. He experienced 
service first following the British retreat from Lexington and Con- 
cord, was later wounded in the Battle of White Plains and died in 
service. His son, Mr. Fay's grandfather, Captain Josiah Fay, was 
town constable, selectman and a skillful mechanic as well as a Revo- 
lutionary officer. George W. Fay, Mr. Fay's father, a builder and 
cabinet maker, held a number of minor town offices. Mr. Fay's 
mother was Amanda A. Ward Fay, a woman whose influence was de- 
cidedly for her son's highest good in every way. 

Country scenes are the background of all of Frank S. Fay's boy- 
hood memories, for his entire youth was spent in the rural town of 
Marlboro. He loved the country, its scenery and sports, and took a 
keen delight in the study of birds, trees and flowers. He received a 
good education in the Marlboro High School, where he graduated in 
1808. He earned his education by working in a shoe shop and as a 
farmer's boy. After leaving high school he studied in the law office 
of his brother, George A. Fay, and was admitted to the Bar in 1871. 

Since 1871, Mr. Fay has practiced law in Meriden, with ever in- 
creasing success. He has held the positions of City Counsel and City 
Prosecuting Attorney at various times and was Prosecuting Agent in 
New Haven County a number of times, from 1876 to 1902. In 1891 

484 



FRANKLIN SULLIVAN FAT 487 

he was a town-site trustee in the Territory of Oklahoma, and secretary 
and treasurer of the deciding boards of land titles for the city of 
Oklahoma. Since March, 1902, he has been judge of the City and 
Police Courts of Meriden, succeeding James P. Piatt ( now TJ. S. Dist. 
Judge of Conn.), and was first appointed by Governor McLean. 

Judge Pay is a member of the Home Club and Colonial Club, of 
Meriden, and the Metabetchum Fishing Club of Canada. He is en- 
thusiastic about all kinds of outdoor sports and country life, and is 
an expert fisherman. He is a Kepublican in politics, and has held a 
number of minor town offices, common to lawyers. He attends the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

In September 1881, Mr. Pay married Elizabeth B. Ham, daugh- 
ter of Allen J. Ham of Stuyvesant, New York. No children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Fay. 

Life as an active career, with success as the goal, may be well 
judged, by one who is so well fitted by both experience and character 
to test human motives and possibilities, as Frank S. Fay. His merci- 
ful justice, impartiality, intense human sympathy and tact on the 
bench, have proved him both judge and friend to his fellows. He be- 
lieves that success comes surest to those who cultivate " common sense, 
honesty, industry, and perseverance." He advises young men to " keep 
young, tackle the duty that lies next — do the best you know how 
and keep at it, and keep sober, for the man who does all that is success- 
ful, whether he knows it or not." 



CHARLES DENISON NOYES. 

NOYES, CHARLES DENISON, president and treasurer of 
the Bulletin Company, Publishers, of Norwich, County 
Commissioner for New London County, secretary of the 
Crane Eealty Company and a leader in banking affairs and local 
political and business matters, was born in the village of Mystic, in 
the town of Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, on 
October 31, 1850. His father was Cyrus Noyes, who was engaged 
in the sign and general painting trade, and was also an investor 
in ships which were at that time built in Mystic, and his mother 
was Bridget Gallup Denison. His father taught him to be industrious 
and strictly honorable and his mother's influence was strongly for his 
highest good. Through both parents Mr. Noyes is descended from 
notable ancestors, dating back to earliest colonial times. The Eev. 
James Noyes was born in England in 1608, educated at Oxford and 
came to this country in 1635. He settled in Newbury, Massachusetts, 
where he preached until his death in 1656. His son James was the 
first pastor of the first church established in Stonington, where he 
labored for over half a century, and he was also one of the founders 
of Yale College. On his mother's side Mr. Noyes is descended from 
William Denison, a native of Bishops, Stratford, in Hertfordshire, 
England, who married Margaret Chandler Meuck in 1630 whom 
he brought to America on the ship " Lyon " with the Bev. John Shot 
in 1631. William Denison settled at Boxbury, Massachusetts, where 
he was a deacon in the church and a respected scholar. His son, 
Captain George Denison, settled in Stonington in 1654 and was very 
prominent in the making of that town. He had previously been in 
the English Army and in the militia at Boxbury, Massachusetts, and 
was a famous Indian fighter. With the exception of Captain John 
Mason he was considered the most conspicuous and daring soldier 
in New London County. He took part in ten separate forays against 
the Indians which broke their power forever. It was in one of his 
expeditions that the famous Narragansett chieftain, Canouchet, was 

488 



CHARLES DENISON NOTES. 491 

captured and afterwards hanged by the Indian allies of the white 
men. Captain Denison also assisted the colonies of Massachusetts 
and Khode Island against the Indians. He received grants of large 
tracts of land for his bravery and achievements and was a deputy 
to the General Court for many terms. He died at Hartford during 
a session of the Court in 1694. The Noyes and Denison families 
have been prominent in Stonington ever since these early settlements 
and are still among the leading families of that town. 

Until he reached the age of eighteen Charles Denison Noyes was 
sent regularly to school and attended, besides the district school in 
Stonington, the public schools of Mystic and the Connecticut Literary 
Institution at Suffield. His schooling was interrupted for one season 
during his fifteenth year when he worked on a farm. Against his 
father's judgment he hired out for a term of seven months to a farmer 
but at the end of a week came home convinced that he would rather 
stay at school. His father, though he disapproved of his losing the 
time from school, insisted on his keeping his agreement and the boy 
returned to the farm and worked out the full time of his contract. In 
this experience he learned not only the value of money and indus- 
trious habits but also the sacred nature of a contract, whether verbal 
or written, and he returned home with $70. saved and the satisfaction 
of doing right. He made up for the interruption to his schooling by 
reading and private study of which history and biography were the 
most influential and profitable branches, as they have been in his later 
life. 

In October, 1868 Mr. Noyes entered the stationery store of M. 
Stafford and Company of Norwich as junior clerk, where he remained 
for seven years. He then founded the firm of Noyes & Davis and was 
its head for twenty-eight years. He is now president and treasurer of 
the Bulletin Company, Publishers of Norwich, secretary of the Crane 
Realty Company, and a director of the Norwich Savings Society and 
the First National Bank of Norwich. He was one of the builders of 
the Groton and Stonington Street Railway and is a director and sec- 
retary of that company. He is also a director in a number of other 
corporations. From 1895 to 1898 Mr. Noyes was a member of the 
Common Council, of the city of Norwich as councilman and alderman. 
In 1901 he was elected county commissioner for New London County 
and his present term expires in 1913. He is active in the Central 



492 



CHABLES DENISON NOTES. 



Baptist Church of Norwich and has served in its board of managers 
for many years. In politics he is a Republican. He is a member of 
the American Geographical Society, the Navy League of tbe United 
States, the Arcanum Club of Norwich, Sons of American Eevolution, 
several Masonic Orders, and other social and fraternal organizations. 

Mr. Noyes believes that " Any young American of average ability, 
correct habits and good address, coupled with fair education, honesty, 
persistence of purpose, loyalty to friends and employers, fidelity to 
duty and an ambition to succeed and make the most of life, stands to 
do so in this country of great opportunity for men of that stamp." 
He enjoys and advocates all forms of clean athletics, provided they do 
not conflict with business interests. 

On October 11th, 1877 Mr. Noyes married Carrie Parthenia Crane 
of Norwich. Their three children, all sons, are living and are : — 
Charles Floyd Noyes of New York City, Frederick Kuiney Noyes of 
Washington, D. C, and Harrison Crane Noyes of Norwich. 



CHARLES W. BARNUM. 

BARNUM, CHARLES W., Vice-President of Barnum, Richard- 
son & Company, and prominent in many other manufacturing 
concerns which are known nationally, was bom in Lime Rock, 
Connecticut, his present home, October 30, 1853, a son of the late 
Hon. William Henry and Charlotte Ann (Burrall) Barnum. On 
both sides he is descended from early settlers, the paternal branch 
having descended from one of the first of our colonists, who estab- 
lished himself at Danbury, Connecticut. Upon the maternal side, 
Charlotte A. Burrall was a lineal descendant of Governor Brad- 
ford. Her mother was Lucy (Beach) Burrall, a member of the well- 
known and prominent Beach family of Hartford, and her father was 
Captain Charles Burrall, whose ancestors on both sides were very 
prominent in Colonial and Revolutionary times. Charles W. Barnum 
spent his youth amid the exquisitely beautiful Berkshire Hills, where 
he acquired the independence and health and robust character which 
such scenes naturally produce. His schooling was secured in the 
public schools of his native place, where his advancement was rapid 
until he had passed through the grammar grades, when he entered 
the select school of the late John H. Hurlbutt, from which he was 
graduated. By inheritance, and by the example of his father, the 
late United States Senator William Henry Barnum, who was one 
of the great leaders of the Democratic party in national affairs, for 
many years, he turned his energy, enthusiasm, and great natural 
ability first into the channels of business, and later into public 
affairs. He followed in the footsteps of his fathers, taking up and 
extending the already large business of the Barnum, Richardson 
Company, manufacturers of Salisbury Pig Iron and Car Wheels, a 
business which was established in 1734, and incorporated one hundred 
and thirty years later, in 1864. Rugged and strong mentally and 
physically, active and restless, progressive and determined, making 
friends easily and holding them firmly, Senator Barnum increased 
the business of the firm and established its trade more firmly through- 
out all the United States. Traveling much in the interest of his firm, 

495 



496 



CHARLES W. BARNUM. 



and thrown constantly with men who dominate large enterprises, 
Mr. Barnum soon was called into positions of trust and influence in 
other important financial and manufacturing concerns. He is a 
director of the Canaan National Bank and of the New England 
Lime Company, of Canaan, vice-president of the Barnum, Richardson 
Manufacturing Company of Chicago, and director of the Railway 
Steel Spring Company, of New York. Very much at home with, 
(and himself one of the important) business men of New York and 
Chicago, his sociable disposition enables him to enjoy to the fullest 
without abuse the privileges which these centers afford, but he has 
never for a moment forsaken his love for and devotion to his native 
place, where he still makes his home. 

Democratic, broad-minded, and kind-hearted, he commands the 
friendship and allegiance of his employees, the good will of his 
neighbors, and the respect of the best people all over Connecticut, 
and beyond in other states through his wide acquaintance. 

Senator Barnum became a member of the Episcopal Church at 
an early age, and has always been one of its most faithful supporters. 
Socially he is a member of the New York Yacht Club. 

Politically, Senator Barnum has always been a devoted Republi- 
can, strong in his adherence to its principles, and active in working 
for its success. So successful and prominent in business affairs, 
and with a depth of knowledge and breadth of view which can only 
be attained through much travel and mingling with men of affairs, 
it was natural that his party should have often sought to enlist his 
services in shaping legislation for a state whose entire welfare is so 
dependent upon the encouragement and protection given to its 
manufacturing establishments. Finally, in 1906, he consented to 
his nomination, which, in his case, was equivalent to election, as 
Senator from his district in the General Assembly. There he was 
honored with the chairmanship of two committees, that on Incor- 
porations and the Committee on Senate Appointments. His popu- 
larity was not confined to members of his own party but, he was 
liked by the opposition as well, for while a vigorous friend he is 
a manly foe. His constituents, having no wish to be served by a 
less able man, promptly returned him to the succeeding session of 
the Senate, and in the session of 1909-1910 he was again chairman 
of the same two committees and of a third, the Special Committee 



CHARLES W. BARNUM. 497 

on Public Utilities, where he stood firmly for a public utilities com- 
mission founded upon principles of right and justice to the citizens 
and to the corporations. 

Recognized as one of the strongest men in the State, he was 
very prominently mentioned for governor, but wisely declined to 
permit the use of his name during the unusual situation which 
developed politically in this State, as in all others, during the year 
1910. But Senator Barnum is a young man, and will not be per- 
mitted to seek seclusion. Such men are needed in political positions 
more than ever now that all industrial as well as transportation 
affairs are coming more and more under state and national control. 

On May 27, 1875, Charles W. Barnum was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary Nicholls, daughter of Reverend George Nicholls, 
of Hoosick Falls, New York. They have two children; Richard N., 
born April 4, 1876, and Charlotte, born October 12, 1879. 



CHARLES ALVORD. 

ALVORD, CHARLES, late manufacturer of Torrington, 
founder, manager, and treasurer of the Excelsior Needle 
Company, was prominently identified with the business, poli- 
tical, social, philanthropic, and religious life of Torrington for over 
half a century. He was born in Bolton, Connecticut on November 
25th, 1826, and died in Torrington on July 13th, 1901. His father 
was Saul Alvord, a well known Tolland County lawyer, and his mother 
was a daughter of Captain John H. Buell, a distinguished Revolution- 
ary officer. 

In his early manhood, about 1850, Charles Alvord located in Tor- 
rington and engaged in the mecantile business with his brother 
Hubbell. Their store was at the corner of Main and Water Streets, 
now known as Agard's Corner, and among other things they were 
the leading manufacturers of the palm leaf bonnets which were then 
so popular. Their trade in this line embraced the surrounding 
towns and rural districts and Mr. Alvord spent many hours in the 
healthful and enjoyable occupation of driving over the hills deliver- 
ing these goods. 

In 1866, Mr. Alvord with several other men organized a company 
for the purpose of manufacturing needles. The first operations of 
this needle factory were conducted in a modest frame building and 
along very limited lines and popular opinion predicted that the 
concern would be short-lived. Mr. Alvord, who was appointed treas- 
urer and manager of the Company, saw a far different future for the 
industry than that prophesied by many capable financiers and worked 
diligently for the sucessful outcome in which he so earnestly believed. 
Forty years elapsed between the founding of the Company and Mr. 
Alvord's retirement from its active management and during that time 
the industry grew, chiefly under his management, to be the first of 
its kind in the world, and to embrace extensive plants busily occupied 
in supplying the world with sewing and knitting machine needles and 
bicycle spokes and nipples. This brilliant success and colossal growth 

498 



CHARLES ALVOKD 501 

is a tribute to Mr. Alvord's foresight, industry, and executive ability 
as well as to his undaunted optimism and purposefulness. For over 
thirty years he was the head and manager of the Company whose 
excellent products are marketed throughout our land and abroad or, 
as has been well said " from New England to Australia." About three 
years before his death, Mr. Alvord retired from the active manage- 
ment of the Company, a step which ill health and advancing years 
made expedient, but until that time he could always be found at his 
desk in the office of the Excelsior Needle Company. 

Mr. Alvord was deeply interested in many local institutions be- 
side his own Company. He was one of the incorporators of the Tor- 
rington Savings Bank and a director and an extensive stockholder in 
the Eagle Bicycle Company. He was actively interested in the Brooks 
National Bank, the Torrington and Winchester Street Eailway Com- 
pany, the Union Hardware Company, and the Torrington Water 
Company. He carried on an extensive real estate business and was 
one of Torrington's largest property owners. He was active and 
influential in public affairs and frequently held minor town offices. 
In 1880 he represented Torrington in the State Legislature. 

The wealth which Mr. Alvord so justly earned through his suc- 
cessful manufacturing enterprises was freely and wisely spent for 
the benefit of his fellow citizens. He was intensely interested in the 
local Y. M. C. A. and gave liberally of his means to free that institut- 
ion from debt and to establish it in comfortable quarters where it could 
bring the utmost benefit to its members. Like his esteemed fellow 
townsman, Elisha Turner, he hated a debt and these two loyal men 
worked together to make up the deficit they so much deplored. To Mr. 
Alvord's beneficence is greatly due the handsome Y. M. C. A. build- 
ing and to his personal influence and example many young men have 
attributed strong moral benefits. His personal work in that, as in 
all other good causes, was conscientious and effective. From the time 
when he first located in Torrington, Mr. Alvord was a zealous mem- 
ber and a generous supporter of the Center Congregational Church 
in that town. When the new church was built he served with telling 
faithfulness on the building committee and to his taste and generosity 
its success is largely due. He also helped to free that church 
from indebtedness. He was likewise substantially interested in 
the French Church in Torrington, to which he gave a new parsonage 



502 



CHARLES ALVORD 



shortly before his death, and frequently helped needy clergy in the 
neighboring towns. He gave freely to foreign and domestic missions 
and never forgot the needy close at hand. These private charities 
were given quietly and with careful judgment of conditions that re- 
vealed tact and sympathy and thoughtfulness. After his retire- 
ment from business he devoted much of his time to the advancement of 
the public good along material, educational and religious lines. 

Mr. Alvord is survived by two sons, George B. and John F. Mrs. 
Alvord was Almira Burtis of New Rochelle, New York. Death came 
to Charles Alvord on July 13th, 1901, after a long but gradual illness 
during most of which he was able to be out among his friends and 
take his usual keen interest in affairs of the day. His was a life of 
lofty and cheerful service to others and of usefulness and achieve- 
ment beyond the power of most men. 



GEORGE HEWLETT CLOWES. 

CLOWES, GEOBGE HEWLETT, one of Waterbury's chief 
captains of industry, former managing partner of the large 
brass manufacturing firm of Randolph & Clowes, is now 
extensively engaged in the real estate business in Waterbury. He 
was born at Clinton, Oneida County, New York, on June 17th, 1842, 
while his father, the Rev. Timothy Clowes, LL.D., an Episcopal 
clergyman and a distinguished man of letters, was president of the 
Clinton Liberal Institute. His paternal ancestors settled in Hemp- 
stead, Long Island, in the latter part of the seventeenth century, 
and their descendants included many notable scholars and men of 
eminence in all the professions. Mr. Clowes' father was a most 
erudite and scholarly man, both as a clergyman and as an educator, 
and he was not only rector of a number of important parishes but he 
was also president of Washington College, Maryland, as well as of 
the Clinton Institute. Mr. Clowes' mother, Mary Hewlett Clowes, 
was of an equally illustrious ancestry, traceable without a break to 
the middle of the eleventh century in England, where theirs was one 
of the great Saxon families, first called Sandys and finally modern- 
ized to Sands, the name of Mr. Clowes' maternal grandmother. Dr. 
Benjamin Sandys was Archbishop of York in the time of Cromwell, 
who confiscated his estates. Sir Edwin Sandys came to this country 
in 1617 and became Governor and Treasurer of the Colony of Virginia. 
In 1040 others of the family settled in Boston and not long after- 
wards owned Block Island. About 1660 a branch of the family 
located on Long Island, whence Sands Points was named. For three 
centuries members of the Sands family have been prominent in busi- 
ness and the professions in New York and vicinity, and have been 
officers and soldiers in the Bevolution and the War of 1812, and 
politicians of influence and renown. 

As his father died when he was but five years of age, George 
Clowes was brought up by his mother. He studied at the Hempstead 
Seminary, the Jamaica Academy, and the Thetford Academy of 
Thetford, Vermont. At the age of fifteen his brother, a banker in 

505 



506 



GEORGE HEWLETT CLOWES. 



De Pere, Wisconsin, offered him a position in his banking house, 
where he worked until he was able to enter Lawrence University in 
Appleton, Wisconsin. After completing his college course, he went 
to live with his mother in Brooklyn, New York, but as the Civil War 
was beginning he enlisted and was at once appointed adjutant of 
the McClellan Infantry, a new regiment then forming. After he had 
aided in recruiting six hundred men for this regiment it was ordered 
to be consolidated with a smaller body and the entire staff changed 
through a most unjust favoritism. This great injustice did not 
lessen Mr. Clowes' patriotism, and when a second call for troops came 
he re-enlisted with the 47th Eegiment, New York National Guards. 
He was sergeant-major of this regiment until he was mustered out. 
He also served in the United States Navy during the Civil War as 
paymaster's clerk on the gunboat " Flambeau " and on the store-ship 
" Home." His brother Joseph was admiral's secretary in the Union 
Navy and afterwards lost a leg at Fort Fisher. 

In the fall of 1864 Mr. Clowes began his actual business life as 
bookkeeper for Garden & Company, New York manufacturers. Two 
years later he accepted a most complimentary offer of a position with 
the Middlefield Fire and Building Stone Company of New York. 
From 1869 to 1872 lie was paymaster's clerk on the United States 
gunboat " Juniata," stationed abroad during that period. Upon his 
return to the United States he became loan and discount clerk for 
the New York Loan and Indemnity Company. During his two years 
with that company he was influential in securing more than a quarter 
of a million dollars of deposits, a large sum in those days. The 
famous old firm of Brown & Brothers of Waterbury kept their New 
York account with the New York Loan and Indemnity Company, 
and when the latter decided to discontinue business in 1874, Mr. 
Clowes was recommended by the president of the New York concern 
to Mr. Philo Brown, president of the Waterbury company, as the 
most worthy, through his character and ability, to receive a respon- 
sible position with Brown & Brothers. As a result Mr. Clowes was 
engaged as head bookkeeper for Brown & Brothers and located in 
Waterbury in January, 1875. He remained with Brown & Brothers 
for eleven years and rose to the position of general office manager 
and assistant treasurer of the company, but it is only fair to say that 
he had no part in the direction, policy, or management of the firm. 



GEORGE HEWLETT CLOWES. 507 

In 1886 financial embarrassment led to the assignment of the com- 
pany, and Mr. Clowes was the only clerk or officer who was retained 
by the trustees to aid them in settling up the highly involved affairs 
of the company, a fine tribute to his honor and ability. With capital 
advanced by Edward Randolph, Mr. Clowes purchased the tube, 
boiler, and kettle departments of the concern from the trustees, believ- 
ing that this portion of the original plant could be made to form 
the nucleus of a great industry. He began with a capital of $75,000, 
fifty employees, and only two hundred customers, and in ten years 
had five thousand customers and an investment exceeding a million 
dollars. Randolph & Clowes soon surpassed the whole world in the 
size and quality of their seamless tubing drawn from single sheets 
of copper. The entire management and policy of the company was 
absolutely in the hands of Mr. Clowes, who supervised the installa- 
tion of the machinery, the selling and financeering, and the inventions 
that have made his products ahead of all competitors. 

In January, 1894, Waterbury made due recognition of Mr. 
Clowes' position in her industrial life by making him president of 
her board of trade. At that time the press said of him, " He will 
leave nothing undone to secure the public blessing," and that prophecy 
was amply fulfilled. 

Since retiring from the active management of the brass industry, 
Mr. Clowes has been a most important factor in the development of 
residential real estate in Waterbury. He purchased twenty-four 
acres of wildwood northwest of Center Square of such rough char- 
acter that it was called " Hardscrabble," and converted it into sightly 
building lots now adorned with fine residences and now called " Nor- 
wood," and including the attractive streets styled Sand, Hewlett, 
Randolph Avenue, Clowes Terrace, and Tower Road. He has also 
cultivated and built up " The Pines " and " Overlook," the latter a 
tract of over four hundred building lots, overlooking the picturesque 
Naugatuck River and affording beautiful homes for the people of 
Waterbury in locations whose value has increased tenfold under his 
improvements. His own imposing residence and ideal home is in 
the Overlook district. 

On June 27th, 1882, Mr. Clowes married Miss Mamie T. Black- 
nail, daughter of George T. Blacknall of Raleigh, North Carolina. 
One daughter, Florence Guernsey, died in 1907. There are two living 
children, Mary Louise and Randolph Clowes. 



DAVID EDWARD FITZ GERALD. 

1J\ ITZ GERALD, DAVID EDWARD, a well known New Haven 
l lawyer, and a prominent Democrat in that city, was born in 
New Haven on September 21st, 1874. His father was Edward 
FitzGerald, a grocer, now deceased, and his mother was Ann Connay 
FitzGerald, who died when her son was but an infant. 

In boyhood David E. FitzGerald attended the excellent public 
schools in New Haven and worked in his fathers grocery store while 
not at his studies. He deems a grocery the best possible place for a 
boy to study human nature and has found his experience there of 
great aid in his later life, and especially in his professional work. 
After preparing for college at the Hillhonse High School he entered 
Yale University Law School in 1893 and received his LL.B. in 1895. 
The following year he did post-graduate work leading to his taking 
the degree of M.L. in 189(1. He passed the bar examinations before 
becoming of age. but had to wait until he was twenty-one before being 
admitted to the bar, that is, until September 21st, 1895. Since that 
time he has practiced law in New Haven with marked success. He 
is senior member of the firm of FitzGerald & Walsh, his partner 
being Walter J. Walsh of the class of '97, Yale Law School. The 
partnership was formed in 1897 and has continued with offices in the 
Law Chambers, New Haven, since date of formation. In the recent 
important controversy between the Connecticut Company, the New 
York and Stamford Railway Company, and the motormen and 
conductors of those companies, relative to the increase of wages, Mr. 
FitzGerald was selected by the employers as their arbitrator. Clarence 
Deming acted as arbitrator for the companies, and he and Mr. Fitz- 
Gerald chose Judge William S. Case as the third arbitrator. The 
result of that body's deliberations and hearings was that a majority 
report signed by Judge Case and Mr. FitzGerald gave the men an 
increase in wages. A minority report against the increase was filed 
by Mr. Deming. The increase carries with it several months of back 
pay and will mean a big increase in the expenses of the road. The 

508 




/\)/h^' 




DAVID EDWARD FITZGEBALD. 



611 



decision is binding on the companies and the men until June 1, 1912. 
This was the first tribunal of its kind involving so many men, about 
2,100, in this State, and was the subject of much comment from the 
press throughout the state, editorially and otherwise. The decision 
affected every trolley man in Connecticut employed by the Connecticut 
and the New York and Stamford companies. 

In the city election of 1907, Mr. FitzGerald was chairman of 
the Democratic Town Committee of New Haven, and a Democratic 
mayor was elected for the first time in eight years. He is a 
member of the Knights of Columbus, the Order of Elks, the New 
England Order of Protection, the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, the Emmet Club, the Knights of Saint Patrick, 
and the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick. He is a member of the 
Roman Catholic Church. 

Mrs. FitzGerald was Alice J. Clark, of Milford, Conn., before 
their marriage, which took place on November 14th, 1900. Mr. and 
Mrs. FitzGerald have two sons, David Clark and John Fowler. Their 
home is at 476 Howard Avenue, New Haven. 

Mr. FitzGerald's greatest pleasure is in his work, and his industry 
is the secret of the large measure of success which he has won so 
early in life. 



19 



WELLINGTON BROWN SMITH. 

SMITH, WELLINGTON BROWN, was born in the town of 
New Hartford in 1856. His father, Darius B. Smith, who 
was born in East Haddam, was a manufacturer of cotton 
cloth in New Hartford at the time. His mother's maiden name was 
Eliza M. Brown, and she was bom in Virginia. His boyhood days 
were passed in his native town. 

Immediately after the completion of his academic education, Mr. 
Smith began the study of law, and was admitted to the Litchfield 
County Bar in 1877, at which time he had barely reached his majority. 
He at once began the practice of his profession in Winsted, and in 
that place, he has ever since been, as he is now, an active and success- 
ful lawyer in both criminal and civil business, the law firm of Smith 
& Munn, of which he is the senior member, being of good repute 
throughout the state. 

After the death of Darius B. Smith, the father, his eldest son, 
George W., who had for some years been associated with him in 
the manufacturing business, under the firm name of D. B. Smith & 
Son, joined interest with his two brothers, Wellington and Darius, 
and together they still carry on the business of cotton manufacture in 
the original factory, enlarged and improved, located on the Farming- 
ton River in New Hartford. Their specialty in production is a heavy 
cotton duck and felts, used in paper making. They have looms cap- 
able of weaving the heaviest and widest cotton duck in this country. 
Mr. Smith's interest in manufacturing is subordinate to his interest in 
his profession, but it takes much of his time and attention. 

From the practice of law to the making of laws there seems to 
be but one step in these United States, politics being the means to the 
end of choosing the members of General Court, where statutes that 
rule in the subordinate courts are made, and on rare occasions un- 
made, to suit the supposed will of the majority. Into politics Mr. 
Smith went as a matter of course, and to all appearances found it a 
congenial career — certainly one in which success has cheered and en- 

612 



WELLINGTON BROWN SMITH. 515 

livened him. He represented the town of Winchester in the House of 
Representatives at Hartford in 1895, and was made chairman of the 
railroad committee. Later he represented Winchester in the Con- 
stitutional convention to revise the state constitution. In that con- 
vention the paramount question was the question of what should be 
the basis of representation of the town in the legislature. The cities 
were united in a demand for representation on a basis of population, 
and the " little hill towns " foresaw in that their own subordination in 
the law-making body for all time to come. This is not the fit place to 
enter into any discussion of the merits of the question on either side. 
The published records of the day show that there was plenty to say 
on both sides and that each side put forward its picked men to say it. 
The small towns numbered 151 and the cities 17, but the towns were a 
disjointed force under tatterdemalion discipline, and somewhat hazy 
in their notions of how best to keep what they already had, and they 
were not unanimous in opposition to the new demand. The cities 
were compactly organized, and officered by men who understood ex- 
actly what they wanted and knew by experience about all that is to 
be known of the ways and means best adapted to get what they wanted . 
Mr. Smith represented one of the small towns (Winchester) and was 
therefore in opposition to the proposed change in the constitution. 
Being there as the representative of a definite idea, he would have 
stood up faithfully and stubbornly to defend it against any op- 
position and gone down before overwhelming odds. The small towns 
were being rounded up to their sure defeat, when their champion 
from Winsted marshaled their representatives by counties into a 
caucus, and was made chairman of that caucus. Thenceforth there 
was unity where before there had been all manner of variety, and the 
basis of representation remained in the revised constitution unchanged.. 

Gov. Abiram Chamberlain made Mr. Smith Judge Advocate Gen- 
eral of his staff. Col. Smith filled the office with credit to himself 
and to the complete satisfaction of his superior. In politics he has 
always been and is now a Republican, though an independent one on 
occasion, with convictions of his own that party chieftains do not con- 
sider it prudent to ignore. 

In his early years of law practice, Col. Smith was for seventeen 
years prosecuting agent of Litchfield County, and during seven of 
those years he was sole prosecuting agent. Furthermore he was an 



516 WELLINGTON BROWN SMITH. 

agent who prosecuted, without fear or favor — for Ms father so made 
Mm that he is afraid of nobody, and fortune has so smiled upon him 
that he has little need of favors. He is a member of the Masonic 
order and of the order of Elks. 

He is not affiliated with any church organization. Intensely 
practical and thoroughly alive to the business affairs of a busy age, he 
may be said to be almost destitute of that " other-worldliness " that 
bothers the heads of a great many well-meaning people. " He is no 
less just or generous or ready with a helping hand for those whom 
he finds in sorrow, oppressed or unfortunate — no less humane and 
kind hearted than those who make loud profession of especial good- 
ness. He is an omniverous reader of solid and informing books, and 
a man of broad sentiments, who, if he ever knew the meaning of sen- 
timentality has forgotten it, and by constant and close association with 
live men of all conditions has come to know men for what they are 
really worth. 



HERBERT SPENCER DORMITZER. 

D0RM1TZEE, HERBEET SPENCER, president and treasurer 
of the American Shear - & Knife Company, of Hotchkissville, 
Connecticut, and one of the ablest among the younger 
manufacturers of the state, was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, 
February 12, 1865, where, with his parents, Henry and Anna 
(ISssroger) Donnitzer, he lived until 1874, when they removed to 
New York City. His education began at the early age of five years 
in a German Lutheran school in Hoboken. He then spent two years 
in the New York public schools, and two years more were spent in 
a French academy in New York. He then attended Columbia 
grammar school, graduating at the end of three years. He com- 
pleted a four years' academic course in Columbia College in the 
class of 1885, receiving his A.B. at the age of twenty. 

He began business life shortly after leaving college, engaging as 
stock clerk in August, 1885, with the firm of Wiebusch & Hilger, of 
New York, importers and sole agents of foreign and domestic cutlery 
and hardware. Four years later, in 1889, he began his career as 
salesman, and in 1893 the responsibilies of buyer of cutlery were 
added to his duties, and his route extended over the entire United 
States, England, France, and Germany. In 1898 he became treas- 
urer of the company, and at the same time was elected vice-president 
of the Challenge Cutlery Corporation of Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
which positions he held until he sold out his interests in both com- 
panies in 1902. 

From the time he was nine years old, until a few years ago, 
Herbert Dormitzer made his residence in New York City, though his 
field covered much of two hemispheres. In 1902 he purchased a 
controlling interest in the American Shear & Knife Co., of Hotch- 
kissville, Connecticut, of which he is now president and treasurer, 
and he then and since has made his home in Woodbury, and has 
naturally taken his place as an important factor in the industrial and 
political activities of Connecticut as well as in the social life of the 
community. 

519 



520 



HERBERT SPENCER DOEMITZEB. 



He has been secretary and treasurer of the Wholesale Pocket 
Knife Manufacturers' Association since l'JOfi. 

His intimate knowledge of every department of the business, 
buying, selling, manufacturing, with his enterprise in securing con- 
trol of patents covering improvements in the utility of his products, 
enables him to conduct his business profitably and keep his factory 
busy through periods of depression as well as in good times. It 
requires no prophet to foresee a growth which will mean large ex- 
tensions to his plant, for few men engaging in manufacturing enter- 
prises are better equipped to command large success than is Mr. 
Dormitzer in his field. Mr. Dormitzer is a member of Adelphic 
Lodge No. 348. F. & A. M., of New York. He is president of the 
Woodbury Inn, Incorporated, and first vice-president of the Hotchkiss- 
ville Republican Club. Politically he is an active and consistent 
Republican, and is fitted by scholarship, travel, and experience to 
give a good account of himself in the halls of legislation. He made 
his first, but not his last, record as a lawmaker in the General 
Assembly of 1909, in which he represented Woodbury very capably, 
where he was the ranking member of the Committee on Finance. 
He was the author of the new Inheritance Tax law, and was " father " 
of the celebrated "Carmody" Utilities Bill. He is very sure to be 
returned by his satisfied constituents until he is called by them to 
higher positions. 

On May 11, 1907, Herbert S. Dormitzer was married to Margaret 
C. Daniels, and they have three sons, Harold James, Henry Herbert, 
and Herbert Spencer, Jr. 



FRANK LORENZO STILES. 

STILES, Hon. FRANK LORENZO, senator, and one of the lead- 
ing manufacturers of New England, was born at North Haven, 
Connecticut, July 12, 1854. He is the son of Isaac Lorenzo and 
Sophronia M. (Blakeslee) Stiles, the father having been a well known 
brick manufacturer and a member of the Connecticut General Assem- 
bly. His first American ancestor was John Stiles of Windsor, and 
he is a direct descendant of Rev. Ezra Stiles, who was president of 
Yale College. 

He received his earlier education at the Lovell School, New 
Haven, and then at the famous Cheshire Academy, where he was in 
line to be appointed valedictorian of his class, but, his father having 
died just before the date for graduation, made it necessary for him 
to cease his school life abruptly, and carry on the business which his 
father had established. 

With the energy and activity which seems naturally to spring 
from a strong, vigorous nature which is reared in the exhilarating air 
of the country, Mr. Stiles began to learn the brickmaker's business in 
his father's plant when he was eighteen years of age. He learned 
this lesson as he did those in school, well, so well that the business, 
whose output at the time he assumed the management amounted to 
from one to one and a half million brick a year, now manufactures 
and sells about seventy millions of brick annually — the largest in 
New England, and probably the largest in the country. This means 
a great deal when one reflects that the manufacture of brick is the 
largest single item in the most important group of clay manufactures, 
and that the value of this group reaches hundreds of millions yearly, 
and far surpasses in value that of all the precious metals produced 
in the country. 

Senator Stiles is not only president and treasurer of the I. L. 
Stiles & Son Brick Company, North Haven, Connecticut, one of the 
very largest individual plants of its kind in America, but is also presi- 
dent and treasurer of the Stiles & Hart Brick Company, Taunton, 
Massachusetts, and of the Stiles & Reynolds Brick Company, Berlin, 

523 



524 



FRANK LORENZO STILES. 



Connecticut, and of the Stiles & Davis Brick Company, North Haven, 
Conn. 

He is also deeply interested in agricultural pursuits, having 
several farms at North Haven and at Taunton and New Britain. He 
is very fond of good horses, motoring, and whatever gives healthy 
diversion to a busy life which is already filled with an unusual variety' 
of business activities. He is a warden of St. John's Episcopal Church, 
a thirty-second degree Mason, a member of the Union League of New 
Haven, and of numerous organizations in Meriden, Providence, and 
other cities. In politics he is a Republican and ably represented his 
town in the General Assembly of 1903. He was elected senator from 
his district to the session of 1909, where, as chairman of the com- 
mittee on agriculture, he promoted the enactment of legislation of 
great value to the entire state. He was also chairman of the committee 
on forfeited rights, and a member of the committee on incorporations. 
He is treasurer of the Connecticut Legislative Club of 1909. It is 
the active participation of a comparatively few such strong characters 
in legislation which holds the ship of state on an even keel. 

On December 22d, 1886, Frank L. Stiles was united in marriage 
with Mary Amelia Dickerman, daughter of Philos and Amelia H. 
Diekerman, of Mount Carmel, Conn., and a descendant of one of the 
oldest families of New England. 





'£5^-7^-7-^-1^7^ 



THORVALD FREDERICK HAMMER. 

HAMMER, Thorvald Frederick, late inventor and general man- 
ager of the Malleable Iron Fittings Company of Branford, 
New Haven County, Connecticut, was born in Copenhagen, 
Denmark, on the fourteenth of August, 1825, and died in Branford, 
Connecticut, May 24th, 1901. His father was Peter Hammer, a 
navigation officer at ports of the Baltic Sea, and his mother was Jo- 
hanna Bestrup Hammer, a woman whose motherly influence was a 
strong factor for good on all phases of her son's life. 

On account of the nature of his father's calling, Thorvald Ham- 
mer spent his youth in various places, both in the city and the 
country. He inherited his father's mechanical bent and took the 
keenest interest in books on science and mechanics. He was educated 
at the Danish Royal School of Navigation and was graduated as a 
mechanical engineer and master navigator. 

After completing his technical education Mr. Hammer entered the 
naval service as assistant navigator out of the port of his native city, 
Copenhagen. After a number of years' experience as a navigator 
he left the sea and came to this country where he was occupied for 
many years as a mechanical engineer and the executive head and 
general manager of various large mechanical plants. From 1864 to 
1901, the year of his death, he was general manager of the Malleable 
Iron Fittings Company of Branford, Connecticut. Such a long and 
important connection with such an extensive industry bespeaks Mr. 
Hammer's prestige in the world of mechanical progress and as an 
industrial executive, and his many valuable inventions give further 
testimony to his skill and talent. His mechanical inventions are 
numerous and well known, the most important being his sand mold- 
ing machine, which, with modifications, is now used in all the large 
factories of the world, and his tapping machinery for the threading 
of pipe fittings. 

In religious faith the late Thorvald Hammer was a Lutheran 
and in politics he affiliated with the Republican party. His favorite 

527 



628 THOBVALD FREDERICK HAMMER. 

study was astronomy and his most enjoyable pastimes were garden- 
ing and yachting. 

On the fifteenth of October, 1856, Mr. Hammer married Delphina 
Lvmdsteen. Six children were bom to bim, two of whom. Thora 
Delphine and Linda, are deceased. The living children are: Alfred 
Emil, Laura Johanna, Julia Henrietta and Valdemar Thorvaklsen. 




; ■ ■ ,-:----■■ 




<yL^C 




EDGAR CHAPIN LINN. 

LINN, EDGAR CHAPIN, of Hartford, Connecticut, owner and 
promoter of real estate subdivisions in all parts of the United 
States, and ex-president of the Connecticut Building and Loan 
Association, is a native of " New Connecticut " in the Western Reserve, 
Ohio, where he was born May 29th, 1861. He is a descendant of 
some of the oldest settlers of the Western Reserve and is the son of 
Dr. and Mrs. Ezra Buell Linn. His great-great-grandfather, Joseph 
Linn, was an adjutant in the Revolution. Going still further back, 
we find Mr. Linn's ancestry traceable to William Buell, who came 
from England to Massachusetts in 1630 and settled in Windsor, Con- 
necticut, in 1639. Deacon John Buell, grandson of William, married 
Mary Loomis in 1695. Her tombstone at Litchfield, Connecticut, tells 
that she was the mother of thirteen children, the grandmother of 
one hundred and one, and the great-grandmother of two hundred and 
seventy-four. Edgar C. Linn was one of the great-great-great-grand- 
children. 

Until he was fourteen years old, Edgar C. Linn attended the 
public school in Richmond. He then earned enough money to carry 
him through a two years' course at the Academy in Austinburg, Ohio. 
After that he became clerk in a general store in Conneaut, Ohio, with 
a salary of $100 a j'ear. After five years of this work he was put in 
management of this store. He earned enough money at this work for 
two years in college, which he spent at Allegheny College. After 
leaving college he resumed the management of the Conneaut store, 
which he held until 1884, when he established himself in the retail 
shoe business. Five years later he sold out the large business he had 
developed. 

In 1887, after retiring from the shoe business, he became identi- 
fied with a building and loan association in Conneaut and continued 
in this business for ten years, completely mastering the real estate and 
investment business. 

531 



582 EDGAR CHAPIN IJNN 

In 1895 Mr. Linn came to Connecticut to take the position of 
agency manager and secretary of the Connecticut Building and Loan 
Association. In 1901 he was elected president of the Association. 
He resigned from this office in 1902 in order to give his time to the 
operation of territory he now controls. He is now one of the largest 
land operators in the United States. 

In June, 1884, Mr. Linn married Harriet Hawley, daughter of 
Gideon Hawley, of Conneaut, Ohio. Five children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Linn, three of whom are now living: Robert H., Eliza- 
beth H, and Chapin C. Mr. Linn's home is on Arnolddale Road, West 
Hartford, and his business is in the Sage-Allen Building, Hartford. 




...■ ., -■ s .: ■■ : .'.,—_r s :—■ : :■' 



JOHN THOMAS HENDERSON. 

HENDERSON, JOHN THOMAS, deputy chief engineer for 
the Connecticut River Bridge and Highway District, at 
Hartford, was born on a farm near the town of Elkton, 
Cecil County, Maryland, on March 19th, 1876, the son of William 
Cyrus Henderson, a farmer and merchant, and grandson of John 
Henderson. His mother, Annabel Smith Henderson, filled his early 
life with strong moral and spiritual influence. 

Long hours of hard farm labor left John Henderson little leisure, 
even in early boyhood. He was determined to have a thorough educa- 
tion and was willing to work all of his time outside of school hours 
to attain that important end. He inclined strongly to mathematics, 
mechanics, physics and history. After preparatory courses at the 
public schools of Cecil County and the Newark Academy, he entered 
Delaware College, in Newark, Delaware, where he took special courses 
in the branches of study which appealed to him so strongly and also 
took a four years' military course at the same time. During each 
summer vacation of his college course he worked to earn money for 
the next year's college expenses. He was graduated with the civil 
engineer's degree in 1896. 

The two years following his graduation as a civil engineer Mr. 
Henderson spent in the study of bridges and bridge building. In 1898 
he entered the office of the consulting engineer of the Manhattan 
Elevated Railway Company of New York, where he was employed as 
rodman. He also worked as draftsman for the late William Rich 
Hutton. On June 1st, 1898, Mr. Henderson located in Hartford, 
as draftsman for the Connecticut River Bridge and Highway District. 
While in that position he worked under Edwin D. Graves as consult- 
ing engineer and designed several bridges for the Greenwich and 
Johnsonville Railway Company of New York City, the bridge across 
the Penobscot River at Bangor, Maine, and a suspension foot-bridge 
across the Kennebec Biver at Waterville, Maine. He was chief drafts- 
man in designing the steel plate-girder bridge, East Hartford (cost 

535 



536 



JOHN THOMAS HENDERSON. 



$120,000), and on all the preliminary studies for the bridge which 
now connects East Hartford and Hartford and is one of the world's 
greatest bridges. He acted as chief draftsman and assistant engineer 
on this bridge until May 2Sth, 190f>, when impaired health compelled 
Chief Engineer Graves to relinquish the duties of his office, and Mr. 
Henderson was appointed deputy chief engineer by the Bridge Com- 
mission. This was a great opportunity and an unusual responsibility 
to come to so young a man as Mr. Henderson, but he was peculiarly 
fitted by experience, training, ability and personality to be equal to 
the task. The work done by the Bridge Commission has been esti- 
mated at $3,000,000, and the office work for the construction of the 
bridge and its approaches has been entirely under Mr. Henderson's 
personal supervision. 

On September 3d. 1902, Mr. Henderson was elected an associate 
member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and on September 
3d, 1907, he was elected to full membership in that society. He is a 
member of the Connecticut Society of Civil Engineers, the Hartford 
Golf Club, the Order of Masons, in which he has taken the thirty- 
second degree, as follows: St. John's Lodge No. 4, Pythagoras 
Chapter No. 17, Wolcott Council, Washington Commandery, Charter 
Oak Lodge of Perfection. Hartford Council Princes of Jerusalem, 
Cyrus Goodell Chapter of Rose Croix, Connecticut Sovereign Con- 
sistory and Sphinx Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 

He is illustrious Potentate of Sphinx Temple and is thrice Potent 
Master of Charter Oak Lodge of Perfection. In politics he is a 
Republican. Golf is his favorite out-door recreation, and music his 
indoor pastime. 

On December 27th, 1905, Mr. Henderson married Maude Helen 
Keeney, daughter of Frank and Emma Bidwell Keeney of Rockville. 
Their home is on Capitol Avenue, Hartford. 

Great responsibilities have come to John T. Henderson early iu 
his career and deservedly so. He believes that his success and skill 
in his profession has been due to " hard work and having to shift 
for himself, with no one to rely on." The result of his most important 
work, the Hartford bridge, is so well known that it is in itself a 
universally accepted commentary on Mr. Henderson's ability as an 
engineer. 



JOHN HENRY RORABACK. 

RORABACK, J. Henry, lawyer, politician, recent post-master 
and a leader in public affairs in Canaan, Litchfield County, 
Connecticut, is also president of the Berkshire Power Com- 
pany, the Sharon Electric Light Company and the Canaan Printing- 
Company. He was bom in Sheffield, Massachusetts, on April 5th, 
1870. His parents, John C. Roraback, a farmer, and Maria Hoysradt 
Roraback, were natives of New York State who moved to Massa- 
chusetts in 1830 and were prominent in their community for their 
highly respected characters and for their leadership in social life 
and public matters. 

As he was reared on a farm, J. Henry Roraback had manual 
duties to perform in early boyhood and he was taught by his mother 
that whatever was worth doing was worth doing well and by hard 
labor and honest dealing. Prom the time he was fourteen until he 
was eighteen he walked three miles to school in winter and worked 
on the farm during the summer months. He attended the public 
and high schools of Sheffield and Great Barrington, Massachusetts, 
and completed the regular high school course in 1888. He was fond 
of reading and especially enjoyed the works of Scott and Dickens. 
After leaving school he taught in the district school in the town of 
Salisbury and he found his experiences as a teacher very valuable in 
the chances they afforded for the study of human nature so helpful 
in his later career as a lawyer and public man. 

In the fall of 1889, while he was still teaching school, Mr. Rora- 
back began to study law in the law office of his distinguished brother, 
Judge A. T. Roraback of Canaan. He also did newspaper work on 
the Connecticut Western News, published in Canaan, and acted as 
principal of the Canaan High School, thus paying his expenses and 
making his legal education a possibility. 

In January, 1892, he was admitted to the Litchfield County Bar 
and from that time on he has maintained a law office in Canaan. His 
legal practice has been successful from the first, as has also been his 
political career. 

539 



540 



JOHN HENRY RORABACK. 



A strong Republican in his political creed. J. H. Roraback has 
served his party in many distinguished capacities- In 1898 he became a 
member of the Republican State Central Committee. He has been town 
clerk, town treasurer, and postmaster of Canaan, his term in the 
last named office expiring in 1910. In all of these official positions 
he has acted efficiently for his party and town and has evinced tact, 
executive skill and integrity. 

Mr. Roraback is president of the Berkshire Power Company which 
owns and operates the Norfolk Electric Light and Power Company, 
and the Sharon Electric Light Company, he is president of the 
Canaan Printing Company, publishers of the Connecticut Western 
News and the Sharon News, president and director of the American 
Carlsonite Company of Hartford, and a director in the Canaan 
National Bank and in the Eastern Machine Screw Company of New 
Haven. 

On the 29th of April, 1896, Mr. Roraback married Mary Louise 
Parsons. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Roraback, 
one of whom is now living, Lewis Roraback, born in 1899. 




'&^p<--^ 



EDWARD TAYLOR BUCKINGHAM. 

BUCKINGHAM, EDWAED TAYLOR, the present mayor of 
Bridgeport, and a leading lawyer and Democrat of that city, 
is as prominent in fraternal affairs as he is in public life and 
in his chosen profession, the law. He was born in Metuchen, Dutch- 
ess County, New Jersey, on May 12th, 1874, the son of Walter T. 
and Helen E. Buckingham. His father was an accountant and a 
man honored for his honesty, integrity and trustworthiness, being 
at one time city clerk of Norwalk and at another time deputy col- 
lector of customs at Bridgeport. Through him Mayor Buckingham 
is descended from Governor William A. Buckingham, Connecticut's 
well-remembered " War Governor," who held that office from 1858 
to 1866 and raised 55,000 troops from his state without recourse 
to draft, greatly exceeding the state's quota, and who was afterwards 
United States Senator from Connecticut. 

The first seven years of Mayor Buckingham's life were spent in 
the country and the rest of his life in Bridgeport. His early home 
influences were ennobling and lasting, that of his good mother being 
especially strong on his moral and spiritual life. He was equally 
interested in books and athletics and thus preserved a balance in his 
intellectual and physical development. In boyhood, as in mature life, 
he was well and healthy, and he had no obstacles in the way of a 
satisfactory preparation for his life work which he determined at 
an early age should be the law and public service in political activities. 
He read history and the biographies of public men with great interest 
and inspiration. He prepared for college at the Bridgeport High 
School, graduating in 1891, and then entered Yale University where 
he took his B.A. degree in 1895 and his LL.B. degree in 1897. 

In 1898 Edward Buckingham began the practice of law in 
Bridgeport and he has maintained an unusually successful practice 
there ever since. His career in public life began almost as soon as 
his professional career and has been equally distinguished. He was 
elected Justice of the Peace in 1898 and again in 1900. He was 
elected City Clerk for terms of two years in 1901, 1903, 1905 and 
20 543 



544 



EDWAJRJD TAYLOB BUCKINGHAM. 



again in 1907. In 1909 he was elected to his present important 
office, mayor of Bridgeport. At the recent Democratic Convention 
in New Haven he had the honor of being mentioned as a candidate 
for Governor but he withdrew his name and seconded the nomination 
of Judge Simeon Baldwin, the choice of the convention. He has 
never shifted his political allegiance from the Democratic party to 
any other and is considered one of the state's strongest Democrats. 

Mayor Buckingham is a member of the Yale Club of New York, 
the University Club of Bridgeport, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, No. 32, Samuel Harris Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, St. John's Lodge, No. 3 F. and A. M. and Lafayette 
Consistory, 32nd degree, Joseph Dowdal Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles and Wowompon Tribe No. 40, I. 0. 
E. M. In the last named he has been Past Sachem and Great Senior 
Sagamore of the State. In St. John's Lodge F. and A. M. he has 
been Past Master. In creed he is a Congregationalist. 

Outdoor life and exercise are important parts of Mayor Buck- 
ingham's daily life. He particularly enjoys base ball and tennis. 
He is a base ball player of no little distinction, having pitched on 
various teams since he served on the Law School teams. These 
include several city official teams in Bridgeport. At tennis he is also 
an expert, having won many city and state cups in the past twelve 
years. 

Young men are always eager to hear the advice of men who have 
achieved success early in life and for this reason as well as many 
others the opinion of Mayor Buckingham has a strong appeal. He 
says : " Be moderate and temperate, but do not try to be too prom- 
inent; mingle and rub elbows with successful men and get their 
ideas. Belax whenever it is possible and be ready at all times to 
listen to reason and profit by the experience of others. Make your 
dealings with men open and fair, be honest with yourself and you will 
be honest with others. Betain old friendships when you make new 
ones, remembering that most of the successes of life are attained by 
assistance from others and that by yourself and your own strength 
little can be accomplished." 

On June 3, 1903, Mayor Buckingham married Bessie Kussell 

Budeau. Two sons have been born of this marriage, both of whom 

are now living. 
( 



HENRY HARRISON BRIDGMAN. 

BRIDGMAN, HENRY HARRISON, of Norfolk, Litchfield 
County, Connecticut, has been a publisher and prominent in 
politics, though now retired, but he is even better known for 
bis interest in philanthropy, education, religion and all things that 
make for the uplift of his fellow men. Though his work as a loyal 
and zealous Republican, who as state representative, presidential elector 
and as a delegate to the national conventions is well known, he com- 
mands the esteem of his community on higher grounds, for he is 
doing much for the happiness, culture and education of the people 
not only in his own town but throughout the county and has pro- 
moted organized charitable work to a great and fruitful degree. 

Montreal, Canada, was Mr. Bridgman's birthplace and the date 
of his birth was October 3, 1841. His father was Thomas Bridgman, 
an author and antiquary, and his mother was Sally Maria Bridgman, 
a woman whose strong character, keen mind and pure spirit exerted 
lasting influences for good on her son's life and principles. Through 
her Mr. Bridgman traces his ancestry to Francis Cooke, a passenger 
on the Mayflower in 1620. 

On the paternal side Mr. Bridgman is decended from James 
Bridgman, in turn a descendant of Sir Orlando Bridgman of England, 
who came from England to Hartford in 1640 and in 1654 became 
one of the first settlers of Northampton, Massachusetts. 

Most of Mr. Bridgman's youth was spent in Northampton and 
his education was acquired in the public schools of that town. At the 
age of seventeen he became a clerk in a local book store. When he 
reached the age of twenty he went to New York City and became 
identified with the firm of Ivison, Blakeman and Company, publishers 
of school books. Afterwards he became a member of the firm, remain- 
ing in that connection until 1891, when the company was succeeded 
by the American Book Company to which Mr. Bridgman transferred 
his interest and with which he is still identified. 

Many public honors and responsibilities have been given to Mr. 

545 



546 



HENET HARBISON BRIDGMAN. 



Bridgman. Prom 1898 to 1900 he was state representative from 
Norfolk. In 1899 Gov. Lounsbury appointed him a member of the 
State Board of Charities, of which he was president for seven years. 
He declined reappointment by Gov. Woodruff in 1907. In 1909 he 
was a delegate to the National Republican Convention in Philadel- 
phia which nominated McKinley and Eoosevelt. In 1900 he was also 
Republican president elector and president of the State Electoral 
College. He is at present (1908) presidential elector of Connecticut 
for Taft and Sherman. 

In philanthropic institutions Mr. Bridgman is equally prominent. 
He was one of the organizers of the New York Charity Organization 
Society and was a member of its Central Council. He is vice-pres- 
ident of the National Eed Cross Society representing Litchfield 
County. He has been a delegate to the National Prison Congress 
and to the National Civic Federation from Connecticut. 

Mr. Bridgman is a Congregationalist in creed and is one of the 
chief supporters of the church of that denomination in Norfolk. He 
is corporate member of the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions, and he is president of the Board of Trustees of the 
Hartford Theological Seminary. He is also a director of the Hart- 
ford Insane Retreat. He is active in all local affairs for the public 
good, in the beautifying of the splendid old town of Norfolk, and in 
the advancement of art and music and learning. 

The clubs and social organizations of which Mr. Bridgman is a 
member are the Union League, the Aldine and Grolier Clubs of New 
York and the New England Society of New York, in which he was 
a director for several years. 

On June 1st, 1893, Mr. Bridgman married Alice Bradford 
Eldridge, daughter of the late Rev. Joseph Eldridge, D.D., and of 
Sarah Battell Eldridge of Norfolk, the latter a lineal descendant of 
Governor William Bradford of Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bridgman have two children, Eldridge Le Baron and Isabel Battell. 

The family estates are at Norfolk where Mr. Bridgman makes his 
home during the greater part of the year. 

Though retired from active business Mr. Bridgman has an office 
at 15 William Street, New York, where he manages the private 
affairs and the estates of the family. 



WILLIAM H. GARDE. 

GABDE, the late WILLIAM H., widely known throughout the 
East among business and profesional men as proprietor of 
the Hotel Garde of New Haven, and later of the Hotel Garde 
of Hartford, was born in Cheshire, Connecticut, March 13, 1850. 
He was the son of M. J. and Katherine Garde. 

William H. Garde was educated in the Cheshire Academy and 
at the age of seventeen years he went to Meriden, Connecticut, there 
to embark in his life-long career as a restaurant and hotel keeper. 
Prom 1867 to 1886 he remained in Meriden, during which period he 
was interested in a number of small hotels. Then he went to 
Southington, Connecticut, as proprietor of the Bradley House and 
remained there until 1890. The following year he spent in Fort 
Plain, New York, as proprietor of the Hotel Grant, but the climate 
of this locality was too harsh for his uncertain health and he returned 
to Connecticut, taking up his residence in New Haven. 

For two years he traveled to regain his health, but in 1893 he 
returned to his old chosen profession when he became proprietor 
of the Westmoreland House in New Haven, only to leave it a year 
later when he built the Hotel Garde, which he opened June 1st, 1894. 
It was a modest hostelry with only twenty-seven rooms, but in the 
ten years that followed the constantly increasing demands of a popular 
business caused him to build a number of additions until the house 
was the largest in New Haven and the largest in the state. In 
October, 1903, Mr. Garde, whose ill health constantly restricted his 
business activities, sold out the business to E. H. Meyer of New 
York, who still continues as proprietor of the house, which he holds 
under a lease from Mr. Garde. Besides this property, Mr. Garde 
owned the Commercial House in New Haven and a considerable 
amount of valuable real estate in that city. 

After resting a year and a half, Mr. Garde began to build the 
Hotel Garde in Hartford. Interested with him in this enterprise 
were his wife, Mrs. Ada H. Garde, and his two sons. William E. 

547 



548 



WILLIAM H. GARDE. 



and Walter S. Garde, who assumed the active duties of the establish- 
ment owned under the name of the Roslyn Investment Company, 
William H. Garde being president, and his elder son, Walter S., vice- 
president. The house was opened May 23d, 1906, and from the first 
enjoyed a large and thriving high-class business. 

For more than thirty years previous to his death on January 28th, 
1907, Mr. Garde had been an invalid, and during the last years of 
his life his eyes failed him somewhat. This impaired vision led to 
a fall which he sustained in the new Hotel Garde building in Hart- 
ford on December 2d, 1905, the effects of which undoubtedly were 
the cause of his last illness. At the time of his fall he was confined 
to his bed for eight weeks, and was forced to spend the remaining 
winter months in southern health resorts in an endeavor to recuperate 
from his injuries. His last illness lasted for ten weeks previous to 
his death. 

Through all the years of his illness, during which he submitted 
to operation after operation. Mr. Garde was known as a man of quiet, 
uncomplaining temperament, a keen and close observer of men, a 
famous and brilliant story teller, and a conservative and trustworthy 
business man. Few men in this state have known more people from 
all parts of the earth and did Mr. Garde and he was popular with 
and esteemed by them all. The measure of real heroism displayed by 
a man to whom this high praise can be justly paid is entirely beyond 
appreciation by the ordinary man and woman possessed of rugged 
health, and who frequently chafe and complain at having to endure 
even for a brief period illness and afflictions which are trivial com- 
pared to those which Mr. Garde sustained for half a life time with 
a fortitude and cheerfulness only possible to great characters. 

Mr. Garde was a member of Myrtle Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
of Meriden, and of Crosswell Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, of New Haven. In 1875 William H. Garde was united in 
marriage to Miss Ada H. Chapin, daughter of George F. and Mary 
L. Chapin. They had two sons: William E. Garde, born December 
17th, 1885, died in Hartford, June 25th, 1908; and Walter S. Garde, 
born July 30th, 1876. A daughter, Mollie, died when three years old. 

He is survived by his widow and son, Walter S., a sister, Mrs. 
G. M. Egan, wife of ex-Chief -of -Police Egan of Waterbury, and a 
brother, Joseph A. Garde, manager of the Kalbfleiscb. Chemical 
Company of Naugatuck. 



ROBERT ORVILLE EATON. 

EATON, KOBERT ORVILLE, collector of internal revenue, 
agriculturist, former member of Legislature and a strong 
Republican and Mason, is a resident of Montowese, New 
Haven County, Connecticut. He was born in North Haven on Feb- 
ruary 20th, 1857. He is a direct descendant of Theophilus Eaton, 
who came from England and was one of the founders of New Haven 
and governor of the New Haven Colony for twenty consecutive years. 
Since 1639 the Eaton family have been leaders in public affairs in 
and near New Haven and have succeeded to possession of the original 
family homestead built by Governor Eaton. Mr. Eaton's parents 
were the late Jesse Orville and Mary Ann Bradley Eaton. His father 
was a farmer who held the offices of assessor, member of board of 
relief and selectman. Of his mother Mr. Eaton gratefully says that 
" she covered every phase of life and conduct — moral, spiritual and 
intellectual — with her good and strong influence." 

On his father's farm young Robert Eaton found plenty of hard, 
healthy work to do in his boyhood days, but this did not prevent his 
acquiring a good, practical education. He attended the schools in 
North Haven and the Hillhouse High School in New Haven. He 
then took a course at French's Collegiate Academy in New Haven. 
After his graduation from the academy, Mr. Eaton became asso- 
ciated with his brother in the management of the farm which is still 
known as the Eaton Brothers' Farm and is still under their capable 
supervision. Haymaking and market gardening have been their 
specialties and their farm has been prosperous along these lines as 
well as in a general agricultural way year in and year out, regardless 
of weather conditions, so often adverse. 

Ever since he attained his majority, Robert 0. Eaton has been a 
loyal and zealous Republican, counting no effort too great to be 
made for his party and cause. As a result his valuable services have 
won frequent official recognition in both local and state politics. He 
was a member of many party councils and a frequent debater, cam- 

649 



550 



EOBKBT ORYILLB BATON. 



paigner and organizer in his early political experiences. He has 
been chairman of the town Republican committee for many years. 
In 1891 he was assistant dairy commissioner and he was reappointed 
to this office in 1896. His zeal in prosecuting violators of the dairy 
and milk laws was untiring and fruitful of great benefit to the com- 
munity. In 1895 Mr. Eaton was elected state representative from 
the twelfth district. For many years he has been a prominent member 
of the Republican State Central Committee. At the time of the Yale 
bi-centennial, Mr. Eaton was chosen to represent North Haven, as 
that town had the honor of having been the town of a former presi- 
dent of the university. In March, 1908, Mr. Eaton received his 
present important official appointment, collector of internal revenue. 

Mr. Eaton is a leading Granger and has written papers and 
delivered addresses before many Grange gatherings. He was a 
Grange master for several terms. He is a member of Adelphia 
Lodge, Masonic, of the Union League Club of New Haven, of the 
Young Men's Republican Club of New Haven, of the Farmers Club, 
of the Union League, and of the Hartford Club. In creed he is a 
Congregationalist. For recreation he enjoys baseball, football, auto- 
mobiling and driving. 

On May 19th, 1881, Mr. Eaton married Catherine Almira 
Grannis of East Haven, who died about three years ago. Of the 
three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Eaton, two daughters are now 
living. 

As a guide to others Robert 0. Eaton says : " Whatever task or 
work is assigned to you, do it faithfully and well." This most assur- 
edly has been the secret of his own success as a farmer, a public man, 
and an "all 'round citizen." 



ISAAC EMERSON PALMER. 

PALMER, ISAAC EMERSON, who, as president of The I. E. 
Palmer Company, Middletown, Connecticut, is at the head of 
the largest hammock industry in the country, a company 
which also does a very considerable business in netting and open mesh 
fabrics of various kinds. He was born in the town of Montville, 
Connecticut, February 27th, 1836. He traces his ancestry to Walter 
Palmer, the emigrant ancestor of the family, who came to America 
in 1629, settled in Salem, Massachusetts, and was afterwards a 
founder of Charlestown, Massachusetts. In 1633 he located in 
Stonington, Connecticut. Deacon Gershom Palmer, son of Walter 
Palmer, was a soldier in the Colonial Wars. Gideon Palmer, in the 
next generation, father of Isaac Emerson Palmer, was an extensive 
land owner in Montville and the inventor of a method of extracting 
oil from cotton seed and of an oil press, after which the present 
baling press is modeled. The former of these patents, issued in 1830 
and signed by Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson, is now in 
Mr. Palmer's possession. 

Mr. Palmer received a common school education and a practical 
knowledge of machinery and the manufacturing business under the 
instruction of his father, with whom he was associated, and later 
attended the Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield. He soon 
availed himself of the opportunity to go to Texas with his brother 
Elisha, to establish the first cotton manufacturing industry in that 
state, where he acquired his first knowledge of the workings of the 
steam engine of the mill, made patterns of a working model of the 
cylinder and assisted in moulding and casting it, brought the castings 
home completed and put it in operation, before he was eighteen years 
of age. He has now in his possession the engine and lathe with which 
it was built. He was next called upon to move a cotton mill from 
Houston to Galveston, for which he received a considerable salary, 
with all expenses paid. He next contracted for building machinery 
for the Willimantic Linen Company, under guardianship, which was 

551 



652 ISAAC E. PALMEE. 

the real beginning of his independent business career. Next he 
purchased the machinery of a woolen mill, which he converted to 
cotton carding and spinning machinery. During a visit to St. Louis, 
in 1858 and 1859, he invented and took out his first patent (at 
twenty-three years of age) for the well-known Palmer Self Adjusting 
Stop Pulley, under the fourteen year term, which was later, owing 
to its unusual merits, extended to the full term of twenty-one years. 
It is in general use today, not having been superseded. This pulley, 
being specially adapted to suspending mosquito canopies, led to his 
manufacturing and selling of articles of this description, which has 
been carried on without interruption to this day. Mr. Palmer also 
built up a considerable industry in the manufacture of cordage, which 
was later transferred to the Ossawan Mills Company of Norwich, 
Connecticut. 

Next in line came the manufacture of mosquito netting and com- 
plete canopies, on which many patents have been obtained, both on 
the looms and the weaving. Window screen cloth was next taken up. 
Then a complete dying and finishing establishment was added to the 
business, a number of patents being obtained on the machinery and 
various finishing processes. Crinoline dress linings were next added 
to the manufactures. In 1883 the weaving of cotton hammocks was 
added to the line, which practically revolutionized the hammock in- 
dustry. Many patents were secured upon their construction, weaving 
and designs. At the present time the plant is ahead of all others in 
the country, as regards both output and facilities. The establishment 
of a modern plant for spinning cotton yarns was next accomplished. 
At the present time the business occupies two plants, requiring a 
floor space of over 200,000 square feet and employing approximately 
four to five hundred persons. The production is protected by over 
350 patents of Mr. Emerson's own inventions, covering articles, 
machines, processes and designs, with many other inventions in plate. 

On May 16th, 1876, Isaac Emerson Palmer was married to Miss 
Matilda Townsend, a native of Bovina, Mississippi, daughter of Samuel 
and Caroline (Johnson) Townsend of that place, and a granddaughter 
of Hon. William G. Johnson of Uncasville, Connecticut. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Palmer have been born three children, Townsend (vice- 
president of the company) Nathalie Townsend and Isaac Emerson, 
Jr., deceased. 



THEODORE HALL MCKENZIE. 

MCKENZIE, THEODORE HALL, civil engineer, consulting 
engineer on hydraulic and sanitary works and a leading 
resident of Southington, Hartford County, Connecticut, is 
of Scottish ancestry and belongs to the MacKenzies of Dyke, Murray- 
shire, Scotland, from which town his father came when he settled 
in America as a young man. His name was William McKenzie and 
his occupation was contracting for public works. He built many 
large and expensive heavy masonry constructions and held some 
minor public offices, including those of selectman and membership on 
the school committee. The mother was Temperance Hall, a godly 
woman of great strength of character and a zealous temperance 
advocate as her name implies. The family lived in Yalesville, 
Wallingford, and it was there that Theodore was born March 29th, 
1847. 

There were as few idle hours in Theodore McKenzie's boyhood as 
there have been in his mature life. When not in school he was either 
at work with the engineers on the public works under his father's 
charge or else at home intently reading all kinds of scientific works 
or such inspiring and helpful poets as Scott, Byron, Whittier, Long- 
fellow, Pope, and Bryant. He studied at a private school in Walling- 
ford, at the High School in Meriden, and at the Connecticut Literary 
Institute in Suffield where he took the scientific, course and studied 
surveying. 

His first practical experience at engineering began as soon as 
he left school, when he spent two years in the employ of E. M. Reed, 
the superintendent, and Wm. Cooper, the chief engineer of the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. He continued his studies 
in surveying and also took private lessons of professors in the 
Sheffield Scientific School at Yale. The next step in his career as an 
engineer was two years' experience as assistant engineer with the 
New Haven and Northampton Railroad, followed by two years' work at 
Middletown as division engineer for the Connecticut Valley Railroad. 

553 



554 



THEODORE HALL MCKENZIE. 



He spent the following year as locating engineer on the Massa- 
chusetts Central K-ailroad. After that he was engaged in locating and 
building the Providence and Springfield Railroad, first as chief assist- 
ant and later as chief engineer. After the completion of this under- 
taking he acted as city engineer of Meriden for three years and as 
street commissioner of Meriden for one year. While city engineer 
of Meriden he planned the sewer system of that city. For the ten 
subsequent years Mr. McKenzie was secretary of the Peck, Stow and 
Wilcox Company at Southing-ton and during that time had charge 
of the building and insurance and other branches of the business. 
During this period also he planned and built the waterworks of 
Southington and Plainville and planned the sewerage disposal plant 
of Meriden. — an important step in the advancement of engineering 
in this State as it was the first disposal plant built in Connecticut. 

Since leaving the Peck, Stow and Wilcox Company Mr. 
McKenzie has been engaged as chief or consulting engineer on four- 
teen waterworks and twelve sewer systems. His recent undertakings 
are the construction of the waterworks at Brewster and Millerton, 
New York, and sewerage disposal works at Princeton, New Jersey, 
Gloversville, New York, and Sharon, Connecticut: also water power 
transmission plants on the Shetucket River and at Berlin, Connecticut, 
at Groton Falls, New York, and on the Ashokan Reservoir site 
in the Catskills. His offices are in Southington and in the State 
Capitol at Hartford as he is a member of the State Board of 
Engineers. He is also a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and of the State Board of Health. Other organizations to 
which he belongs are the Connecticut Society of Civil Engineers, 
the New England Waterworks Association, the Order of Masons, the 
Baptist Church, and the Bepublican party in politics. He is a director 
of the Fairfield County Home and secretary and treasurer of the 
Southington Water Company. 

Mr. McKenzie's family consists of a wife, Mary E. Neal, daughter 
of Roswell A. Neal of Southington, whom he married in 1871, ;md 
four children. One son, Samuel H., is superintendent and manager 
of the Southington Water Company and another, William A., a 
graduate of Worcester Institute of Technology, is resident engineer on 
Carnegie Lake, Princeton, and is also chief engineer of the Princeton 
Sewage Disposal Works. One of Mr. McKenzie's daughters is a 



THEODORE HALL MCKENZIE. 555 

graduate of Emerson College and the other of Laselle Seminary of 
Auburndale, Massachusetts. 

For recreation from business Mr. McKenzie has both an nut- 
door and an indoor hobby for he regards horses and music as the 
best relaxation from the cares of life. He believes in temperate 
habits and hard work and advises the seeker after success to abstain 
entirely from tobacco in any form and from liquor and drugs, " and 
also to learn some business, trade or profession thoroughly." 



ELISHA JONES STEELE. 

STEELE, ELISHA JONES, manufacturer, Civil War veteran, 
former state representative, and leading business man of 
Torrington, is treasurer of the Coe Brass Company in that 
city. He was born in Torrington on June 29th, 1843. He is a 
descendant of George Steele, who came from Sussex, England, and 
was admitted a freeman at the General Court of Massachusetts in 
May, 1632. Mr. Steele's grandfather was Norman Steele, a pros- 
perous manufacturer of Derby, Connecticut. Mr. Steele's father, 
William Spencer Steele, was a manufacturer of brass buttons, super- 
intending one of the largest industries of Torrington. Mr. Steele's 
mother was Caroline Amelia Jones Steele, a woman of admirable 
character and uplifting influence. 

At the early age of eight, Elisha J. Steele worked in his father's 
factory and soon after that he hired out on a farm. His schooling 
was confined to that afforded by the common school in Torrington 
and ended when he was fifteen. He was given to studious habits and 
read the Bible, the works of Shakespeare and Dickens, American 
history, and such newspapers as the New York Tribune, the New York 
Independent, and the Hartford Courant with great profit. Henry 
Drummond was another author who was helpful in fitting him for his 
life work. 

Though but a lad of seventeen years when the Civil War broke 
out, Elisha Steele was one of the first enrolled of the eleven men 
who enlisted at the first war gathering held in his town. He served 
in the war as a member of Company I, First Connecticut Volunteers. 
Heavy Artillery, from May 23d, 1861, to August 12th, 1865. He 
took part in many severe engagements and served through the Penin- 
sular campaign, including the siege of Yorktown. He participated in 
the engagements before Kichmond and assisted in the defense of 
Washington. 

After his honorable discharge from the Union army in 1865, 
Mr. Steele returned to Torrington and entered the employ of the 

558 



ELISHA JONES STEELE. 



557 



Turner & Seymour Manufacturing Company, with whom he remained 
until 1875, a period of ten years. He next entered the Coe Brass 
Company, being engaged as superintendent of the press department. 
Four years after he was promoted to the position of superintendent 
of the wire and rod department, and in 1889 he was given still further 
responsibility as director of the brazed and seamless tube department. 
Later he succeeded James A. Doughty as secretary, and later Mr. 
E. T. Coe as treasurer of the Coe Brass Company, his present import- 
ant position in the industrial world. His thirty-five years' connection 
with the brass industry has been a most creditable one, involving 
constant advancement and continued success. He has taken out two 
patents on his inventions for making brass tubes. 

Mr. Steele was a member of the Torrington Board of Education 
for fourteen years and chairman of that board for ten years. He is 
a member of the State Board of Education for the Blind, vice-presi- 
dent of the Connecticut Prison Reform Association, a director in 
the Torrington Water Company and in the Torrington Printing 
Company. 

The same zeal that made Mr. Steele fight for the Union in his 
early manhood has made him work for all patriotic causes throughout 
his mature life. He is a prominent member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic and is past commander of Steele Post No. 34, named in 
honor of his brother, Lambert W. Steele, who gave his life for the 
Union at Petersburg, Va. In 1867 Mr. Steele was one of a com- 
mittee of three to erect a monument in Torrington in memory of 
Civil War heroes. In 1891 he was an aide on the staff of General 
Russell A. Alger, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He was a member of the commission to erect an eques- 
trian statue at Gettysburg in memory of Major-General John Sedg- 
wick. He is always a leading spirit in Decoration Day celebrations. 

A loyal Republican, Mr. Steele has been actively identified with 
the affairs of his party. In 1887 and 1888 he represented Torrington 
in the State Legislature and was chairman of the committee on 
appropriations. For ten years he was chairman of the R< publican 
Town Committee. 

A devout Congregationalist, Mr. Steele is a member of the Society 
Committee of his church and a life member of the American Home 
Missionary Society. He was Sunday School superintendent for ten 



558 



ELISHA JONES STEELE. 



years and choir leader for a number of years. He was one of the 
organizers of the Torrington Young Men's Christian Association, is 
chairman of its finance committee and one of its most ardent and 
effective workers. He has been president of the association since 1895 
and has been a director since its organization. In 1895 he was a 
delegate to the National Y. M. C. A. Convention at Cleveland. 

Mr. Steele is a member of the Sons of the American Eevolution. 
the Society of the Army of the Potomac, the Army and Navy Club 
of Connecticut, of which he was vice-president, the local lodge of 
Knights of Honor, of which he was a charter member and of which 
he has been treasurer since its organization, the Torrington Club and 
the Hardware Club of New York. 

In 1890 Mr. Steele was one of a legislative committee to the 
centennial celebration of the settling up of the Western Reserve in 
Ohio. In January, 1899, he was appointed Quartermaster-General of 
Connecticut by Governor Cooke, but the demands of business forced 
him to decline the honor. 

On January 20th, 1865, Mr. Steele married Sophia Hannah 
Skiff. Pour children were born of this marriage, Abbie A., who died ; 
William S., who was first lieutenant in Company D, Third Regiment 
Connecticut Infantry, in the Spanish War, and died from typhoid 
fever contracted in that service ; two daughters are now living, Jennie 
A. Steele Hall and Annie A. Steele Tuttle. 

The foundation stones of a successful career are believed by 
Mr. Steele to be " Loyalty to our country, the flag, and clean politics, 
and that righteousness which exalteth a nation." He advocates out- 
door exercise and is himself devoted to baseball and sea bathing. He 
makes his home at Torrington, where his busy and honorable life 
lias wrought well for the good of many. 



WILLIAM GIBSON FIELD. 

FIELD, WILLIAM GIBSON, A.M., LL.B., lawyer, writer and 
public speaker, of Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, was 
born in Easton, Pa., on October 25th, 1841. He is descended 
from early colonial settlers, who came from Yorkshire, England, and 
springs from the same stock as did Cyrus W. Field of Atlantic cable 
fame. Mr. Field's parents were Dr. C. C. Field and Susannah Free- 
man Field. His father was a graduate of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and was one of a long line of eminent physicians and surgeons. 
The mother was a daughter of a magistrate of Freemansburg, Pa., 
for whom that town was named. 

In early boyhood, Mr. Field was studious in his habits and his 
career in school and college was marked with many honors, particu- 
larly along oratorical lines. He graduated from the Easton High 
School in 1858 and became the first president of the High School 
Alumni Association. Four years later he was graduated at Lafayette 
College with the degree of A.B. While at Lafayette he was a member 
of the Washington Literary Society and made many important ora- 
tions, besides being a frequent contributor to the " Monthly." After 
leaving Lafayette, he entered Harvard University, taking the senior 
year with the class of 1863 and receiving the degree of A.B. with Jolm 
Fiske, the historian, and Charles S. Fairfield, a member of President 
Cleveland's first cabinet. While at Harvard he wrote many articles for 
the Harvard Magazine. He next entered Harvard Law School, where 
he received his LL.B. degree in July, 1865. He also attended the 
lectures of many eminent men and held many prominent offices. He 
was secretary of the Law School Parliament and president of the 
Parker Club. Later he received the degree of A.M. from Harvard 
and from Lafayette. 

Mr. Field then entered the law offices of the late Ex-Gov. Eedder 

and of the late Chief Justice Henry Green, of the Pennsylvania 

Supreme Court. He was admitted to the Bar and practiced law in 

Pennsylvania for a number of years. In 1867 he was elected secretary 

81 559 



560 WILLIAM GIBSON FIELD 

of the Farmers and Mechanics Institute of Northampton County, Pa., 
and served five terms. While in Easton he spent most of his time 
outside of the law in editing the Easton Daily Dispatch, which he 
founded in 1874. He also accepted many invitations to deliver public 
addresses, a good number of which were printed in current periodicals. 
He addressed educational and religious bodies from time to time and 
was a popular speaker on historical and dedicatorial occasions. His 
remarks were always scholarly, timely, and eloquent. He made a 
number of political speeches while in Pennsylvania, most of which 
were published. He also continued to be a loyal contributor to the 
Lafayette Monthly and it was in one of his articles to that paper 
he proposed forming a National College Men's Union for literary and 
other friendly contests. The proposition aroused the interest of college 
men throughout the land, and Mr. Field continued to agitate the 
subject in the New York press. As a result, a national convention was 
held in Hartford, which initiated the intercollegiate contests with 
which all are now familiar. Other honors given to Mr. Field during 
his residence in Easton were his appointments as State Commissioner 
for California in Pennsylvania, lay reader in the Episcopal Church 
in South Easton, vestryman of Trinity Church, Easton, Sunday-school 
superintendent, and Y. M. C. A. director and member of the . City 
Board of Control. 

In 1887 Mr. Pield removed to Brooklyn, New York, and in 
October of that year he married Miss Edna M. Potter of Suffield, Con- 
necticut, a descendant of Gov. William Bradford, famous as a May- 
flower passenger and for his part in establishing Thanksgiving Day. 
Mrs. Field's great-great-grandfather, Captain Ephraim Pease, was a 
prominent citizen of Enfield, and a participant in the French and 
Indian War. He built the colonial residence which is now the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Field, and once entertained Gen. Washington within its 
walls. After his marriage Mr. Field spent about ten years in Brooklyn 
and practiced law in that city and in New York. In 1897 Mr. Field 
was admitted to the practice of law in all the courts of Connecticut 
and he still continues his successful legal practice. 



INDEX TO VOLUMES I, II, III, IV, AND V. 

MEN OF MARK. 



Name 
Adams, John C, Rev. 
Adler, Max 
Allen, Isaac A., Jr. 
Ailing, John W. 
Allyn, William I. 
Alsop, Joseph W. 
Alvord, Charles 
Anderson, Joseph, Rev. 
Atwater, Francis 
Atwater, Wilbur 0. 
Atwood, Eugene 
Atwood, Henry C. 
Atwood, James A. 
Atwood, John W. 
Atwood, Lewis J. 
Atwood, Walter S. 
Atwood, William E. 
Averill, Herman 0. 

Back, Harry E. 
Bacon, Benjamin W. 
Bailey, Henry L. 
Banks, Elmore S. 
Barbour, Joseph L. 
Baldwin, Simeon E. 
Barnes, Carlyle F. 
Barnes, Norman A. 
Barnum, Charles W. 
Bartlett, Joseph L. 
Bassett, Royal M. 
Bassett, Theodore S. 
Beach, Charles M. 
Beach, George W. 
Beardslee, Clark S. 
Beardsley, Morris B. 
Beers, Henry A. 



Volume 


Page 


2 


192 


1 


242 


5 


72 


1 


274 


3 


352 


5 


344 


5 


501 


2 


150 


2 


288 


1 


316 


3 


378 


5 


414 


3 


9 


3 


11 


2 


147 


5 


348 


5 


477 


5 


72 


5 


371 


2 


77 


3 


332 


1 


263 


2 


297 


1 


90 


5 


96 


4 


402 


5 


495 


2 


249 


1 


432 


1 


357 


5 


297 


4 


176 


3 


65 


3 


261 


1 


120 



Name 
Belding, Alvah N. 
Benedict, Francis G. 
Bennett, Edward B. 
Bennett, William L. 
Bigelow, Edward F. 
Bigelow, Frank L. 
Billings, Charles E. 
Bingham, Theodore A. 
Birdseye, Isaac W. 
Bishop, Dexter L. 
Bishop, Henry A. 
Bishop, William D. 
Birge, John 

Blakesley, Augustus M. 
Blakeslee, Dennis A. 
Bliss, Benjamin 
Boardman, William B. 
Boardman, W. F. J. 
Bodenwein, Theodore 
Bourne, Edward G. 
Bradbury, John H. 
Bradley, Amon 
Bradley, Edward E. 
Bradley, Mark S., M.D. 
Brandegee, Frank B. 
Bradstreet, Thomas D. 
Brainerd, Cyprian S., Jr. 5 
Brainerd, Lyman B. 3 

Brainerd, Frank 5 

Brastow, Lewis O. 1 

Brenton, Cranston, Rev. 3 
Brewster, Rt. Rev. Chaun- 

cey B. 4 

Brewster, James H. 3 

Bridgman, Henry H. 5 

3 



Volume 
1 
1 

1 

2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
4 
5 
4 
4 
2 
3 
5 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 

4 
3 
3 
5 
1 

9 



Page 
254 
140 
194 
249 

18 
454 
434 

75 

31 
470 

14 

9 

236 

53 

22 
262 
151 
155 

34 
154 
174 
203 
160 
249 

54 
295 
209 

15 
395 
217 
173 

389 
222 
545 
143 



(561) 



562 



INDEX 



Name 
Brinsmade, Daniel S. 
Brinsmade, John C. 
Brinsmade, William G. 
Bristol, Benjamin H. 
Bristol, Isaac B. 
Bristol, William H. 
Brixey, William R. 
Brooker, Charles F. 
Brooks, Isaac W. 
Brown, Arthur M. 
Brown, Edward T. 
Brown, James F. 
Browne, John D. 
Bryan, Burton G. 
Bryant, Samuel J. 
Bryant, Thos. W. 
Buck, John R. 
Buckingham, Charles B. 
Buckingham, Edward T. 
Bulkeley, Morgan G. 
Bunee, Jonathan B. 
Burnham, Edwin G. 
Burnham, William E. 
Burpee, Lucien F. 
Burr, Willie 0. 
Burrall, Edward M. 
Butler, William 

Camp, Caleb J. 
Camp, David N. 
Camp, Walter 
Canfield, Charles S. 
Carlson, Gustaf B. 
Chase, George L. 
Case, William S. 
Catlin, Lyman S. 
Chaffee, Charles E. 
Chamberlain, Abiram 
Chandler, Charles E. 
Chandler, Randolph H. 
Chapin, Charles F. 
Chapman, Maro S. 
Chapman, William H. 
Chapman, Silas, Jr. 
Chase, Henry S. 



lume 


Page 


4 


28 


3 


176 


4 


118 


3 


178 


4 


37 


o 


347 


5 


212 


2 


59 


3 


13 


3 


358 


4 


400 


o 


234 


2 


358 


1 


257 


3 


171 


5 


186 


1 


237 


3 


384 


5 


543 


1 


46 


2 


OS 


4 


43 


5 


205 


3 


336 


1 


265 


4 


360 


2 


196 


3 


103 


1 


409 


1 


428 


5 


100 


5 


561 


2 


52 


2 


28 


5 


145 


o 


151 


1 


148 


3 


376 


4 


232 


1 


357 


3 


31 


1 


442 


5 


464 


3 


17 



Name 
Chase, Irving H. 
Cheney, Louis R. 
Chichester, Henry E. 
Chipman, Edward C. 
Chittenden, Russell H. 
Chittenden, Samuel H. 
Clark, Charles E. 
Clark, Charles H. 
Clark, Charles H. 
Clark, George M. 
Clark, Henry H. 
Clark, George M. 
Clark, Levi Nelson 
Clark, William B. 
Clark, William J. 
Clark, Theodosius 
Clowes, Geo. H. 
Cleveland, Livingston W 
Coburn, Jesse M. 
Coffin, Arthur D. 
Coffin, O. Vincent 
Coffin, Herbert R. 
Coffin, Herbert R., Jr 
Coit, Robert 
Coil, William B. 
Collins, Atwood 
Collins, William A. 
Condell, Aquila H. 
Conn, Herbert W. 
Converse, Alfred W. 
Cook, Albert S. 
Cooke, Lorrin A. 
Corbin, George W. 
Corbin, Lewis A. 
Corbin, Philip 
Crandall, Charles H. 
Crilly, John A. 
Crofut, Sidney W. 
Cross, Wilbur L. 
Crothers, Thomas D., M.D 
Cummings, Homer S 
Curtis, George M. 
Curtis, George R. 
Curtis, Howard J. 
Curtis, Lewis F. 



Volume 


Page 


4 


55 


1 


240 


3 


67 


4 


31S 


1 


116 


2 


223 


4 


318 


4 


76 


1 


230 


4 


34 


4 


72 


5 


381 


2 


197 


1 


211 


4 


71a 


4 


68 


5 


505 


7 . 5 


433 


3 


118 


5 


226 


1 


161 


5 


218 


5 


222 


4 


61 


4 


65 


2 


371 


3 


69 


5 


265 


1 


145 


2 


299 


2 


109 


3 


324 


5 


83 


3 


296 


2 


91 


3 


196 


5 


286 


4 


81 


2 


84 


.D. S 


118 


1 


386 


4 


98 


4 


94 


2 


43 


4 


102 



INDEX 



563 



Name 
Curtiss, Edward L. 
Curtiss, William P. 
Cutler, Ralph W. 

Davidson, Charles S. 
Davis, Charles H. 
Day, Edmund 
Deming, Clarence 
Des Jardins, Benjamin M. 
Dewell, James D. 
Diekerman, Sidney F 
Dickinson, Arthur M 
Dinsmore, Charles A., Rev 
Disbrow, William E. 
Doolittle, Thomas B. 
Dormitzer, Herbert S. 
DuBois, Augustus J. 
Dunbar, Edward B. 
Dunham, Sylvester C. 
Dunn, Daniel P. 

Eaton, Levi W. 
Eaton, Robert O. 
Edwards, Charles L. 
Edwards, George C. 
Eggleston, Arthur F. 
Ellis, William F. 
Elkins, William L. 
Elmer, William T. 
Elmore, Samuel E. 
Elton, James S. 
Emerson, James M. 
Emery, Albert H. 
English, Henry F. 
Ensign, Ralph H. 
Etheridge, Frank W. 
Everitt, Edwin B. 

Fairchild, Henry E. 
Fairfield, George A. 
Farnam, Henry W. 
Farist, Joel 
Farrell, Franklin 
Fay, George A. 
Fay, Franklin S. 



Volume 


Page 


2 


184 


1 


456 


1 


184 


1 


323 


2 


203 


4 


86 


2 


86 


. 5 


242 


1 


360 


4 


182 


1 


334 


. 1 


376 


4 


50 


3 


386 


5 


519 


2 


175 


2 


251 


3 


35 


4 


385 


4 


108 


5 


549 


1 


378 


4 


24 


5 


26 


3 


354 


3 


27 


2 


21 


2 


123 


1 


450 


1 


488 


1 


351 


1 


380 


2 


125 


3 


347 


3 


251 


4 


114 


5 


37 


1 


294 


4 


364 


3 


316 


4 


218 


5 


484 



Name 
Ferguson, Henry 
Ferris, John H. 
Fessenden, Samuel 
Field, William G. 
Fisher, Irving 
FitzGerald, David E. 
Flagg, Charles N. 
Fletcher, Benjamin 
Forbes, Lawrence S. 
Ford, George H. 
Fox, Simeon J. 
French, Carlos 
Frisbie, Edward L. 
Fuessenich, Frederick 
Fuller, Edward E. 

Gager, Edwin B. 
Garde, William H. 
Gates, Charles A. 
Gay, Henry 
Geer, Curtis M. 
Genthe, Kaxl W. 
Getman, Frederick H. 
Gilbert, Adolph W. 
Gildersleeve, F. 
Gildersleeve, Oliver 
Gillett, Arthur L. 
Glover, Charles 
Godard, George S. 
Godfrey, Charles C, M.D. 5 
Gold, Theodore S. 
Goodell, Thomas D. 
Goodenough, Rev. A: 

H. 
Goodrich, Arthur L. 
Goodrich, Charles C. 
Goodrich, Caspar H. 
Goodrich, Elizur S. 
Goodwin, Rev. James 
Gorham, Frank 
Graham, Charles E. 
Graves, Edwin D. 
Green, David I. 
Greene, Gardiner 
Greene, Jacob L. 



Volume 


Page 


1 


132 


3 


309 


3 


190 


5 


559 


1 


298 


5 


508 


1 


366 


5 


129 


3 


199 


2 


266 


4 


341 


4 


259 


5 


253 


5 


33 


5 


445 


2 


35 


5 


547 


5 


418 


3 


88 


3 


45 


1 


134 


3 


39 


3 


312 


4 


374 


2 


403 


1 


490 


4 


336 


2 


49 


'. 5 


437 


2 


373 


2 


130 


UT 

4 


170 


1 


448 


5 


325 


2 


380 


3 


43 


4 


393 


3 


47 


3 


85 


3 


253 


3 


232 


5 


340 


1 


458 



564 



INDEX 



Name 
Greist, John M. 
Grippin, William A. 
Groesbeck, William J. 
Guilfoile, Francis P. 
Gunn, George M. 

Hadley, Arthur T. 
Hale, John H. 
Hall, Frederic B. 
Hall, Gardiner, Jr. 
Hall, Seth J. 
Hall, William H. 
Hallock, Edwin 
Hallock, Frank K. 
Hallock, Winthrop B. 
Hamilton, Thomas 
Hamersley, W. 
Hammer, Alfred E. 
Hammer, Thorwald F. 
Hammond, A. Park 
Hammond, George A. 
Handel, Philip J. 
Harlow, William Burt 
Harstrom, Carl A. 
Hart, Artemas E. 
Hart, Gerald W. 
Hart, Samuel 
Hart, William H. 
Hatch, Edward B. 
Hayes, Abner P. 
Havens, Owen R. 
Hawkins, Alexander St. 
Hawley, Sidney E. 
Heminway, Buell 
Henderson, John T. 
Hendryx, Andrew B. 
Henney, William F. 
Henry, Edward S. 
Higgins, Edwin W. 
Hill, Ebenezer J. 
Hobbs, Willis F. 
Holcomb, Marcus H. 
Holcombe, John M. 
Holden, Benedict M, 
Hollister, David F. 



Volume 


Page 


5 


400 


1 


201 


3 


87 


5 


137 


4 


213 


1 


105 


1 


402 


1 


87 


5 


303 


o 


275 


5 


309 


4 


198 


5 


47 


5 


50 


4 


381 


1 


97 


1 


470 


5 


527 


1 


246 


5 


359 


3 


92 


3 


220 


3 


292 


o 


207 


5 


235 


1 


426 


1 


397 


5 


337 


5 


451 


4 


58 


5 


422 


5 


198 


2 


311 


5 


535 


2 


261 


1 


235 


1 


64 


1 


77 


1 


70 


3 


187 


1 


363 


1 


291 


5 


231 





121 



Volume 
2 
3 



Name 
Holmes, Ludwig, Rev. 
Holmes, Walter W. 
Holzer, Philip L. 
Hooker, Thomas 
Hopkins, Edward W. 
Hopson, William F. 
Hotehkiss, Henry L. 
Howard, Charles P. 
Howard, James L. 
Howe, Howard G., M.D. 
Howland, John G. 
Hoyt, George H. 
Hubbard, Clement S. 
Hubbard, Elijah K., Jr. 
Hubbard, Elmer S. 
Hubbard, Frederick A. 
Hubbard, John T. 
Hubbard, Leverett M. 2 

Hull, Hadlai A. 5 

Hull, Leander L. 3 

Hungerford, Frank L. 3 

Huntington, Robert W., Jr. 2 
Hyde, William W. 5 

Ingalls, Phineas H., M.D. 5 

Jackson, John D. 1 

Jacobs, Arthur I. 5 
Jacobus, Melanethon W. 3 

Jarvis, Charles M. 2 

Jenkins, Edward H. 3 

Jewell, Lyman B. 4 

Jewell, Marshall 4 

Johnson, Charles F. 1 

Johnson, M. M., M.D. 5 

Johnson, William D. 5 

Judd, Albert D. 2 

Judd, William H. 3 

Judson, Stiles 2 

Keeler, Edwin O. 1 

Keeney, George E. 2 

Keeney, Mayro 3 

Kellogg, Philo M. 3 

Kelsey, Henry H., Rev. 3 



Page 
321 
328 
269 
276 
313 
315 
170 
300 
318 
152 

83 
389 
391 

81 
387 

40 
105 
324 
455 

55 
372 
367 

43 



373 
283 
307 

95 
139 
138 
134 
130 
466 

79 
337 
216 

79 

267 
318 
75 
105 
205 



INDEX 



565 



Name Volume Page 

Kendrick, Greene 1 

Kerr, Charles 5 

Kimball, Arthur R. 1 

Kingsbury, Frederick J. 1 
Kingsbury, Frederick J., 

Jr. 4 

Knight, George H., M.D. 5 
Kuhns, Oscar 1 



Ladd, George T. 2 

Lake, Everett J. 1 

Lamb, George B. 4 

Lang, Henry R. 1 

Larrabee, Henry 4 

Latham, Monroe F. 3 

Lathrop, William M. 1 

Lawrence, Sebastian D. 3 
Leavenworth, Walter J. 1 

Leeds, Charles H. 1 

Lewis, Charlton M. 2 

Lewis, John N. 3 

Lewis, Robert P. 5 

Lewis, Walter S. 5 

Light, John H. 3 

Lilley, George L. 1 

Lincoln, Melvin E. 4 

Linn, Edgar C. 5 

Linsley, Rev. George T. 4 

Lipsette, Lew A. 2 

Lockwood, Edward K. 1 

Lockwood, George F. 3 

Loewe, Dietrich E. 5 

Long, William J., Rev. 3 

Lounsbury, Charles H. 1 

Lounsbury, George E. 1 

Lounsbury, Phineas C. 1 

Lounsbury, Thomas R. 1 
Love, William DeLoss, 

Rev. 2 
Luther, Flavel 8., Jr., 

Rev. 1 

Maefarland, Charles S., 

Rev. 3 

Macfarlane, William T. 3 

Manning, Edward J. 5 



392 
104 
311 
181 

142 

57 

320 

340 
355 
332 
307 

47 
243 
394 
257 
342 
475 
330 
360 
108 

65 
320 

74 
376 
531 
397 
343 
198 
380 
481 

21 
261 
173 
177 
422 

332 

125 



391 
326 
138 



Name 
Manning, Francis M. 
Mansfield, Burton 
Marks, Marcus D. 
Marlin, Mahlon H. 
Marsh, Edward W. 
Marsh, Francis W. 
Mather, Frederick G. 
Matthies, George E. 
Maxwell, Francis T. 
Maxwell, William 
McKenzie, Theodore H. 
McLane, William W. 
McLean, Geo. Payne 
McNeil, Archibald 
Mead, William E. 
Means, Rev. Stewart 
Mellen, Charles S. 
Merriam, Alexander R. 
Merwin, Orange 
Merwin, Samuel E. 
Miel, Ernest deF., Rev. 
Miller, David H. 
Miller, Edward 
Miller, Watson J. 
Mills, Lyman A. 
Mitchell, Asahel W. 
Mitchell, Charles E. 
Mitchell, Edwin K. 
Montgomery, John R. 
Morgan, Daniel N. 
Morgan, James T. 
Morgan, William D. 
Morris, John E. 
Morris, Marshall E. 
Muzzy, Adrian J. 
Mygatt, Henry S. 

Nash, Lloyd 
Neal, Linus B. 
Nettleton, Charles H. 
Nettleton, Wilfred H. 
Newton, Henry G. 
Nichols, James 
Noble, Charles H. 
Noyes, Charles D. 
Noyes, Henry B. 



Volume Page 
3 134 



1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
1 
3 
5 
3 
4 

3 
4 
3 
6 
2 
2 
2 
5 
3 



205 
214 
421 
116 
223 
122 

91 
484 
248 
553 
120 
152 
340 
263 
112 
271 
117 
281 
278 
384 
147 
283 
439 
193 

42 
479 
446 
441 
127 
410 
188 

38 
174 
245 
111 

288 
158 
148 
276 
240 
63 
354 
488 
256 



566 



INDEX 



Name 
Osborne, Wilbur F. 
Osgood, Hugh H. 



Volume Page 

4 275 

5 312 



Page, Charles 
Paigej Allan W. 
Paine, John A. 
Palmer, Charles Ray, D.D 
Palmer, Elisha L. 
Palmer, Frank L. 
Palmer, Isaac E. 
Palmer, Robert 
Park, Angus 
Parker, Francis H. 
Parker, Rienzi B. 
Parrott, Henry R. 
Paton, Lewis B. 
Patten, Freeman F. 
Pattison, Alexander T. 
Peck, Henry H. 
Peck, Miles L. 
Peck, Tracy 
Penfield, Samuel L. 
Pendleton, Moses A. 
Perkins, Henry A. 
Phelan, John J. 
Phelps, Charles 
Phelps, David E. 
Phelps, William L. 
Phillips, Albert W., M.D. 
Phillips, Andrew W. 
Phillips, Watson L., Rev. 
Pickett, Charles W. 
Pierce, Noble E. 
Pierson, Andrew Nels 
Pirsson, Louis V. 
Piatt, James P. 
Plumb, Rollin J. 
Plume, David S. 
Pond, Edgar L. 
Pope, Albert L. 
Porter, Frank C. 
Porter, George L. 
Post, Ezra E. 
Potter, Rockwell H 
Prentice, Samuel O. 



Rev. 2 



350 
352 

259 
160 
143 
376 
551 
334 
365 
272 
372 
154 
168 
2S2 
166 
336 
327 
166 
240 
344 
36S 
349 

25 
226 
271 
348 
356 
369 
473 

24 

89 
255 

11 
207 
138 
207 
207 
285 
284 
367 
378 
100 



Name 
Prescott, William H. 
Prior, Charles E. 

Quintard, Frederick H. 

Raymond, Bradford P. 
Read, Charles B. 
Read, David F. 
Read, David M. 
Read, Frederick W. 
Reed, Joel H. 
Reed, Stephen E. 
Rice, Charles D. 
Rice, Frederick B. 
Rice, Frank J. 
Rice, William N. 
Richards, Charles B. 
Richards, Eugene L. 
Riggs, Robert B. 
Robbins, Silas W. 
Roberts, Harvey L. 
Roberts, Henry 
Robertson, Abraham H. 
Robinson, Frank E. 
Robinson, Silas A. 
Rockwell, Albert F. 
Rockwell, Charles L. 
Rockwell, George 
Rockwell, George L. 
Rogers, Cephas B. 
Root, Charles G. 
Root, Judson H. 
Ropkins, Edgar L. 
Roraback, Alberto T. 
Roraback, John H. 
Rowland, Herbert S. 
Ruger, Thomas H. Genl. 
Rugg, Frederick A. 
Russell, Thomas H.. M.D. 
Russell, William H. 

Sage, John H. 
Savage, George E. 
Sclmeller, George O. 
Srliofield, Edwin L. 



Volume Page 

2 169 

3 60 

5 182 



1 


137 


3 


271 


3 


267 


3 


263 


3 


126 


2 


31 


1 


330 


5 


69 


4 


188 


5 


377 


3 


235 


1 


309 


1 


282 


3 


99 


5 


293 


3 


238 


1 


24 


1 


215 


3 


100 


2 


23 


3 


249 


4 


323 


5 


562 


3 


73 


2 


179 


3 


141 


1 


411 


5 


333 


o 


15 


5 


539 


4 


55 


2 


424 


o 


137 


2 


424 


2 


410 


2 


326 


4 


130 


4 


244 


2 


242 







INDEX 




567 


Name 


Volume 


Page 


Name 


Volume 


Page 


Schwab, John C. 


2 


214 


Swan, James 


1 


417 


Searls, Charles E. 


2 


225 


Swartz, Christian 


4 


327 


Sears, Edwards H. 


4 


239 


Sykes, David A. 


5 


178 


Seeley, William E. 


5 


194 


Sykes, George 


4 


221 


Sessions, Albert L. 


1 


312 


Sykes, George E. 


4 


225 


Sessions, William E. 


1 


302 








Seton, Ernest T. 


2 


144 


Taft, Horace D. 


1 


229 


Seymour, William 0. 


3 


228 


Taintor, James U. 


1 


405 


Sharpe, William C. 


2 


291 


Talcott, Horace G. 


5 


352 


Shelton, Gould A., M.D. 


4 


310 


Talcott, John B. 


o 


102 


Shepard, Andrew N. 


5 


18 


Taylor, John M. 


1 


462 


Shoemaker, Henry F. 


3 


294 


Terry, James 


4 


252 


Shumway, Milton A. 


2 


39 


Thayer, John M. 


2 


18 


Simpson, Samuel 


3 


304 


Thomas, Edwin S. 


5 


441 


Skiddy, William W. 


1 


332 


Tibbits, Charles H. 


5 


406 


Skilton, DeWitt C. 


1 


347 


Tierney, Dennis H. 


5 


459 


Skinner, Elliott P. 


3 


149 


Tinker, George F. 


2 


129 


Slope r, Andrew J. 


2 


113 


Todd, Percy R. 


2 


217 


Smith, Friend W. 


2 


211 


Torrance, David 


1 


80 


Smith, Herbert Knox 


1 


219 


Tourtellotte, Jerome 


2 


232 


Smith, James D. 


2 


133 


Towne, Frederick T. 


2 


386 


Smith, James H. 


4 


369 


Townsend, William K. 


2 


9 


Smith, Wellington B. 


5 


512 


Traut, George W. 


5 


272 


Somers, George E. 


4 


210 


Traut, Justus A. 


2 


156 


Spencer, Alfred, Jr. 


1 


186 


Troup, Alexander 


5 


429 


Spencer, Charles L. 


4 


216 


Treadway, Charles S. 


2 


218 


Spencer, William B. 


3 


158 


Treadway, Charles T. 


5 


93 


Sperry, Ellie N. 


1 


482 


Trubee, David 


4 


248 


Sperry, Lewis 


3 


131 


Turner, Luther G. 


5 


170 


Sperry, Nehemiah D. 


1 


58 


Twiss, Julius 


2 


229 


Stannard, Robert R. 


4 


240 


Twitchell, Joseph H., Rev. 2 


277 


Staples, James 


5 


115 


Tyler, Augustus C. 


2 


209 


Staub, Nicholas 


5 


125 


Tyler, Morris F. 


1 


225 


Steele, Elisha J. 


5 


556 


Tyler, William R. 


5 


396 


Steele, Thomas S. 


4 


195 








Stevens, George B. 
Stevens, Harold W. 


1 


287 


Ullman, Isaac M. 


2 


392 


2 


121 


Upson, Charles M. 


2 


392 


Stevenson, William H. 


4 


235 


Upson, Evelyn M. 


2 


160 


Stiles, Frank L. 


5 


523 


Upson, Lyman A. 


3 


340 


Stillman, Benjamin R. 


2 


257 


Veeder, Curtiss H. 


2 


384 


Stoeckel, Carl 


4 


206 








Stoeckel, Gustave J. 


4 


202 


Wagner, Simeon H. 


3 


394 


Strong, David 


3 


109 


Waldo, George C. 


1 


384 


Sumner, Frank C. 


5 


257 


Wallace, Frank A. 


1 


227 


Strong, Noble B. 


3 


269 


Waller, Thomas M. 


1 


164 



568 

Name 
Walsh, James F. 
Wanzer, Homer L. 
Ward, William S. 
Warner, Hobart A. 
Warner, Lueian D. 
Warren, Herbert C. 
Warren, Tracy B. 
WatrouBj George D. 
Watrous, William H. 
Weeks, Frank B. 
Welcli, Pierce N. 
Wei ton, Nelson J. 
Weston, Thomas A. 
Whaples, Meigs H. 
Wheeler, Arthur C. 
Wheeler, George W. 
Wheeler, Nathaniel 
Wheeler, Ralph 
Wheeler, Richard A. 
Whitcomb, Walter O. 
White, Henry C. 
White, Herbert H. 
White, John H. 
Whitney, Eli 
Whiton, David E. 
Whiton, Lucien E. 
Whitney, Amos 
Whittemore, John H. 





INDEX 






lume 


Page 


Name Volume 


Page 


1 


38 


Wickam, Horace J. 


2 


7L 


a 


305 


Wilcox, Frank L. 


1 


190 


4 


344 


Wilcox, George H. 


4 


284 


3 


165 


Wilcox, Horace C. 


4 


280 


4 


302 


Wile, William C. 


3 


57 


2 


162 


Willcox, Marcellus B. 


2 


119 


4 


302 


Willcox, Washington F. 


3 


342 


1 


196 


Williams, Elias 


3 


114 


o 


199 


Williams, James B. 


5 


239 


5 


9 


Williams, William H. 


2 


397 


1 


251 


Wilmot, Frank A. 


5 


167 


3 


364 


Winchester, Calen T. 


1 


142 


4 


288 


Woodruff, George C. 


4 


314 


2 


65 


Woodruff, George M. 


3 


362 


3 


167 


Woodruff, James G. 


4 


145 


2 


25 


Woodruff, James P. 


4 


306 


5 


319 


Woodruff, Merritt N. 


3 


398 


2 


33 


Woodruff, Rollin S. 


1 


30 


o 


182 


Woodruff, William T. 


o 


98 


1 


413 


Woodward, Henry 


2 


351 


1 


278 


Woodward, P. Henry 


2 


81 


1 


467 


Woolsey, Theodore S. 


2 


279 


3 


210 


Wooster, Albert M. 


5 


156 


1 


371 


Wooster, Wm. Henry H. 


3 


276 


3 


183 


Wooster, Letsome T. 


5 


261 


3 


185 


Wren, Peter W. 


4 


298 


o 


303 


Workman, George D. 


5 


163 


2 


57 


Wright, Henry P. 


1 


110